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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Franco Trabalzini
Based on 12 articles published since 2010
(Why 12 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, F. Trabalzini wrote the following 12 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease. 2015

Lopez-Escamez, Jose A / Carey, John / Chung, Won-Ho / Goebel, Joel A / Magnusson, Måns / Mandalà, Marco / Newman-Toker, David E / Strupp, Michael / Suzuki, Mamoru / Trabalzini, Franco / Bisdorff, Alexandre / Anonymous1830827 / Anonymous1840827 / Anonymous1850827 / Anonymous1860827 / Anonymous1870827. ·Otology and Neurotology Group CTS495, Department of Genomic Medicine, Centre for Genomics and Oncology Research - Pfizer/Universidad de Granada/Junta de Andalucía (GENyO), PTS, Granada, Spain Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital de Poniente, El Ejido, Almeria, Spain. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univerisity School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden. · Otology and Skull Base Department, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italy. · Department of Neurology, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Neurology and German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany. · Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Neurology, Centre Hospitalier Emile Mayrisch, Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg. ·J Vestib Res · Pubmed #25882471.

ABSTRACT: This paper presents diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease jointly formulated by the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society, The Japan Society for Equilibrium Research, the European Academy of Otology and Neurotology (EAONO), the Equilibrium Committee of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) and the Korean Balance Society. The classification includes two categories: definite Menière's disease and probable Menière's disease. The diagnosis of definite Menière's disease is based on clinical criteria and requires the observation of an episodic vertigo syndrome associated with low- to medium-frequency sensorineural hearing loss and fluctuating aural symptoms (hearing, tinnitus and/or fullness) in the affected ear. Duration of vertigo episodes is limited to a period between 20 minutes and 12 hours. Probable Menière's disease is a broader concept defined by episodic vestibular symptoms (vertigo or dizziness) associated with fluctuating aural symptoms occurring in a period from 20 minutes to 24 hours.

2 Review European Position Statement on Diagnosis, and Treatment of Meniere's Disease. 2018

Magnan, Jacques / Özgirgin, O Nuri / Trabalzini, Franco / Lacour, Michel / Escamez, Antonio Lopez / Magnusson, Mans / Güneri, Enis Alpin / Guyot, Jean Philippe / Nuti, Daniele / Mandalà, Marco. ·Past Head of ORL and Head and Neck Surgery Hopital Nord, Aix Marseille University, Marseille, France. · Department of Otolaryngology, Bayındır Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. · Department of Otolaryngology, Ospedale Pediatrico Meyer, Firenze, Italy. · Aix-Marseille Université, Fédération de recherche 3C: Cerveau, Comportement, Cognition de Marseille St Charles, Marseille, France. · Otology and Neurotology Group CTS495, Granada, Spain. · Universita degli Studi di Siena, Siena, Italy. · Department of Otolaryngology, Dokuz Eylul University School of Medicine, İzmir, Turkey. · Department of Neurosciences, Hopitaux Universitaires Geneve, Geneve, Switzerland. ·J Int Adv Otol · Pubmed #30256205.

ABSTRACT: Meniere Disease keeps challenges in its diagnosis and treatment since was defined by Prosper Meniere at the beginning of 19th Century. Several classifications and definition were made until now and speculations still exist on its etiology. As the etiology remains speculative the treatment models remain in discussion also. The European Academy of Otology and Neurotology Vertigo Guidelines Study Group intended to work on the diagnosis and treatment of Meniere's disease and created the European Positional Statement Document also by resuming the consensus studies on it. The new techniques on diagnosis are emphasized as well as the treatment models for each stage of the disease are clarified by disregarding the dilemmas on its treatment. The conservative, noninvasive and invasive therapeutic models are highlighted.

3 Review [Diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease according to the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society]. 2017

Lopez-Escamez, J A / Carey, J / Chung, W-H / Goebel, J A / Magnusson, M / Mandalà, M / Newman-Toker, D E / Strupp, M / Suzuki, M / Trabalzini, F / Bisdorff, A. ·Otology and Neurotology Group CTS495, Department of Genomic Medicine - Centre for Genomics and Oncology Research, Pfizer/Universidad de Granada/Junta de Andalucía (GENyO), PTS Avda de la Ilustracion 114, 18016, Granada, Spanien. antonio.lopezescamez@genyo.es. · Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital de Poniente, El Ejido, Spanien. antonio.lopezescamez@genyo.es. · Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Südkorea. · Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Lund, Lund, Schweden. · Otology and Skull Base Department, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italien. · Department of Neurology, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Neurology and German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, Ludwig-Maximilians University, München, Deutschland. · Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Neurology, Centre Hospitalier Emile Mayrisch, Esch an der Alzette, Luxemburg. ·HNO · Pubmed #28770282.

ABSTRACT: This paper presents diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease jointly formulated by the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society, The Japan Society for Equilibrium Research, the European Academy of Otology and Neurotology (EAONO), the Equilibrium Committee of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) and the Korean Balance Society. The classification includes two categories: definite Menière's disease and probable Menière's disease. The diagnosis of definite Menière's disease is based on clinical criteria and requires the observation of an episodic vertigo syndrome associated with low- to medium-frequency sensorineural hearing loss and fluctuating aural symptoms (hearing, tinnitus and/or fullness) in the affected ear. Duration of vertigo episodes is limited to a period between 20 min and 12 h. Probable Menière's disease is a broader concept defined by episodic vestibular symptoms (vertigo or dizziness) associated with fluctuating aural symptoms occurring in a period from 20 min to 24 h.

4 Review Hearing preservation surgery: cochleostomy or round window approach? A systematic review. 2013

Havenith, Sarah / Lammers, Marc J W / Tange, Rinze A / Trabalzini, Franco / della Volpe, Antonio / van der Heijden, Geert J M G / Grolman, Wilko. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands. ent-research@umcutrecht.nl ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #23640087.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: An increasing number of patients with low-frequency residual hearing are fitted with a cochlear implant. The challenge is to optimize cochlear implant device properties and develop atraumatic surgical techniques to preserve residual hearing. In view of the ongoing debate about the optimal procedure for opening the cochlea during cochlear implantation, we reviewed the evidence on the round window and the cochleostomy insertion techniques and compared their effects on postoperative residual hearing. DESIGN: Systematic review. METHODS: Electronic databases were systematically searched for relevant studies published up to January 2012. All studies reporting on residual hearing and hearing preservation surgery were included. RESULTS: Sixteen studies, with a total of 170 patients, were included. There were no studies directly comparing both surgical insertion techniques. The methodologic quality of the studies was poor and might be subjected to a high risk of bias. Because there were no studies directly comparing the 2 techniques and controlling for possible influencing factors, differences between studies might also be influenced by intersurgeon variance in many facets regarding cochlear implantation surgery. The available data show a postoperative low-frequency hearing loss ranging from 10 to 30 dB at 125, 250, and 500 Hz, regardless of surgical technique. The number of patients with a postoperative complete hearing preservation ranged from 0% to 40% for the cochleostomy group and from 13% to 59% in the round window group. CONCLUSION: The available data do not show that there is a benefit of one surgical approach over the other regarding the preservation of residual hearing. To provide solid evidence, a double-blind randomized trial is needed, which compares the clinical outcomes, notably the degree of hearing preservation, of both surgical approaches.

5 Review Primary tumors and tumor-like lesions of the eustachian tube: a systematic review of an emerging entity. 2012

Muzzi, Enrico / Cama, Elona / Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo / Trabalzini, Franco / Arslan, Edoardo. ·Department of Specialist Surgery, ENT Unit, Udine University Hospital, Ple S Maria della Misericordia 15, 33100 Udine, Italy. enr.muz@gmail.com ·Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #22160144.

ABSTRACT: Eustachian tube (ET) primary tumors and tumor-like lesions are rare diseases presenting with common ear, nose and throat symptoms. Pathology can range from developmental anomalies to high malignant neoplasms. Hence this review aimed at suggesting a classification and outline relevant aspects of ET primary tumors and tumor-like lesions, describing clinical findings, diagnostic management and therapeutic approaches. MEDLINE, CINAHL, OVIDSP, HIGHWIRE, and GOOGLE databases were searched from inception to July 2011 for relevant studies. Further papers were identified by examining the reference lists of all included. Sixty-five papers met the inclusion criteria, enclosing 78 cases. Case reports are increasing in the past few years. Benign lesions and tumor-like lesions of ET have been reported. Moreover, melanomas, carcinomas, and sarcomas can affect the ET as a primary site.

6 Article Working Memory Function in Children with Single Side Deafness Using a Bone-Anchored Hearing Implant: A Case-Control Study. 2018

Di Stadio, Arianna / Dipietro, Laura / Toffano, Roberta / Burgio, Francesca / De Lucia, Antonietta / Ippolito, Valentina / Garofalo, Sabina / Ricci, Giampietro / Martines, Francesco / Trabalzini, Franco / Della Volpe, Antonio. ·Neurology and Neuropsychology Unit, IRCCS, San Camillo Hospital, Venice, Italy, ariannadistadio@hotmail.com. · Highland Instruments, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. · Neurology and Neuropsychology Unit, IRCCS, San Camillo Hospital, Venice, Italy. · Cochlear Implant Unit, Children Hospital Santobono-Pausilipon, Naples, Italy. · Otolaryngology Department, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy. · Audiology Department, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy. · Otolaryngology Unit, Meyer Children Hospital, Florence, Italy. ·Audiol Neurootol · Pubmed #30439708.

ABSTRACT: The importance of a good hearing function to preserve memory and cognitive abilities has been shown in the adult population, but studies on the pediatric population are currently lacking. This study aims at evaluating the effects of a bone-anchored hearing implant (BAHI) on speech perception, speech processing, and memory abilities in children with single side deafness (SSD). We enrolled n = 25 children with SSD and assessed them prior to BAHI implantation, and at 1-month and 3-month follow-ups after BAHI implantation using tests of perception in silence and perception in phonemic confusion, dictation in silence and noise, and working memory and short-term memory function in conditions of silence and noise. We also enrolled and evaluated n = 15 children with normal hearing. We found a statistically significant difference in performance between healthy children and children with SSD before BAHI implantation in the scores of all tests. After 3 months from BAHI implantation, the per-formance of children with SSD was comparable to that of healthy subjects as assessed by tests of speech perception, working memory, and short-term memory function in silence condition, while differences persisted in the scores of the dictation test (both in silence and noise conditions) and of the working memory function test in noise condition. Our data suggest that in children with SSD BAHI improves speech perception and memory. Speech rehabilitation may be necessary to further improve speech processing.

7 Article Nucleolus vs Nucleus Count for Identifying Spiral Ganglion in Human Temporal Bone. 2018

Di Stadio, Arianna / Ralli, Massimo / Ishai, Reuven / D'Ascanio, Luca / Trabalzini, Franco / Della Volpe, Antonio / Babighian, Gregorio / Ricci, Giampietro. ·University of Perugia, Permanent Temporal Bone Laboratory, Perugia, Italy. · University La Sapienza, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Rome, Italy. · Toronto General Hospital, Otolaryngology Department, Toronto, Canada. · "Carlo Poma" Civil Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Mantova, Italy. · Meyer Children's Hospital, Otolaryngology unit, Florence, Italy. · Santobono-Posillipon Hospital, Otology and Cochlear Implant Unit, Naples, Italy. · University of Perugia, Otolaryngology Department, Perugia, Italy. ·J Int Adv Otol · Pubmed #30256195.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Spiral ganglion (SG) counting is used in experimental studies conducted on age-, noise-, and drug-induced sensorineural hearing loss, as well as in the assessment of cochlear implant performances. Different methods of counting have been reported, but no definite standardization of such procedure has been published. The aim of our study is to identify the best method to count human spiral ganglions (SGs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: By identification of nuclei or nucleoli as described by Schucknect, seven researchers with different experience levels counted SGs in 123 human temporal bones (TBs). Data on time of post-mortem bone removal post-mortem, methods of specimen's fixation, decalcification, and coloration were collected to test their possible influence on human tissue. Percentage, two-tailed t-test, Spearman's test, and one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Nucleoli were identified in 61% of cases, whereas nuclei were recognized in 100% of cases (p<0.005). Nucleoli presence in all four segments in the same temporal bone (TB) was observed in 69 cases (92%), whereas nuclei were identified in all four segments in 103 cases (83.7%) (p<0.001). The junior investigators requested a double check by the seniors in 25 (20.3%) cases for identifying and counting nucleoli, whereas the senior researchers showed no doubts in their identification and count. The only parameter positively affecting nucleoli identification in tissue preparation was bone removal for <12 h with respect to longer post-mortem time (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: We suggest counting nuclei, rather than nucleoli, for spiral ganglion computation because of easier recognition of nuclei, especially in case of investigator's limited experience.

8 Article Maps created using a new objective procedure (C-NRT) correlate with behavioral, loudness-balanced maps: a study in adult cochlear implant users. 2016

Scorpecci, Alessandro / D'Elia, Alessandra / Malerba, Paolo / Cantore, Italo / Consolino, Patrizia / Trabalzini, Franco / Paludetti, Gaetano / Quaranta, Nicola. ·ENT Department, A. Gemelli University Hospital, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. alessandroscorpecci@yahoo.it. · ENT Department, Section of Otologic and Neurotologic Surgery, University of Bari, Bari, Italy. · Cochlear Italy S.r.l., Bologna, Italy. · ENT Department, San Carlo Hospital, Potenza, Italy. · ENT Department San Luigi Gonzaga, University Hospital, Turin, Italy. · Otology and Skull Base Surgery Department, Policlinico "Le Scotte", University of Siena, Siena, Italy. · ENT Department, A. Gemelli University Hospital, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. ·Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #27241055.

ABSTRACT: In uncooperative patients, electrical compound action potential (ECAP) thresholds are reliable in predicting T-levels, but are not in determining the C-level profile. The present study aims to assess if the C-level profile can be predicted by a new objective procedure (C-NRT) which uses the amplitude growth function (AGF) and is based on the assumption that equal ECAP amplitudes elicit equal loudness percepts. This is a correlational study conducted in five tertiary care referral hospitals with 21 post-lingually deaf adult cochlear implant users. Two maps were created: a behavioral, bitonal balanced (BB) map and an objective map, in which T-levels were the same as in the BB map, and C-levels were obtained with C-NRT. C-NRT consisted of performing the AGF of nine electrodes, and of setting the current level eliciting a 100 μV ECAP amplitude as C-level in the map. AutoNRT was also measured. Main outcome measures were correlation between behavioral C-profile level, objective C-profile level, behavioral T-profile level and objective T-profile (AutoNRT) level; disyllabic word recognition scores in quiet and in noise conditions (SNR = + 10 and 0) with both maps. A strong correlation was found between behavioral and C-NRT-derived C-levels (mean per electrode correlation: R = 0.862, p < 0.001). C-NRT could predict behavioral C-levels with a greater accuracy than AutoNRT. Word recognition was significantly better with BB maps only in the quiet condition (p = 0.002). C-NRT is more accurate than AutoNRT in predicting the C-level profile in adult cochlear implant users. This finding encourages future application in uncooperative patients, especially in very young children.

9 Article Cochlear implantation in children with "CHARGE syndrome": surgical options and outcomes. 2014

Ricci, Giampietro / Trabalzini, Franco / Faralli, Mario / D'Ascanio, Luca / Cristi, Cristina / Molini, Egisto. ·Department of Otolaryngology, University of Perugia, Loc. S. Andrea delle Fratte, 06156, Perugia, Italy, ricci1501@hotmail.com. ·Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #23525650.

ABSTRACT: CHARGE syndrome is a rare, polymalformative disease, representing one of the major causes of associated blindness and deafness. Bilateral, severe-profound, sensorineural hearing loss is common in CHARGE children. Aim of this study is to present our results in children with "CHARGE syndrome" submitted to cochlear implantation (CI). The frequency of anatomic anomalies, possible variations in the surgical technique of CI, and the audiological/rehabilitative benefits attained in our patients are reported. we submitted 5 children affected by CHARGE syndrome with profound, bilateral, sensorineural hearing loss to CI. Otoacoustic emissions, auditory brainstem response, acoustic impedance testing, cranial computed tomography and magnetic resonance were carried out preoperatively in all children. CI was performed using the mastoidotomy-posterior tympanotomy approach in two cases, and the suprameatal approach in three children. Infant toddler-meaningful auditory integration scale was used to evaluate kid's audiological performance before and after CI. Intra-operatory findings and postsurgical complications were evaluated. Among our patients, intraoperative anatomical malformations were cochlear hypoplasia (100 %), ossicles malformations (100 %), semicircular canals aplasia (100 %), oval window atresia (60 %), round window atresia (40 %), widening of the aqueduct of the vestibule (20 %), and aberrant course of the facial nerve (20 %). No intra- or postoperative complication was recorded in relation to implant positioning. After a follow-up ranging from 1 to 4.5 years, only 2/5 patients used oral language as the sole mean of communication, 1 started utilizing oral language as the main mean of communication, while 2 patients did not develop any linguistic ability. In conclusion, CI in patients with CHARGE association is feasible and, despite results variability, it should be carried out in CHARGE children with severe hearing loss as soon as possible. Although the selection of a specific surgical technique does not seem to influence the audiological outcome, the suprameatal access is valuable when important surgical landmarks (i.e. lateral semicircular canal and incus) are absent.

10 Article Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus in vestibular schwannoma and unilateral sensorineural hearing loss. 2013

Mandalà, Marco / Giannuzzi, Annalisa / Astore, Serena / Trabalzini, Franco / Nuti, Daniele. ·Otology and Skull Base Surgery Department, University of Siena, Policlinico "Le Scotte", Viale Bracci 11, 53100 Siena, Italy. marcomand@hotmail.com ·Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #23108420.

ABSTRACT: We evaluated the incidence and characteristics of hyperventilation-induced nystagmus (HVN) in 49 patients with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging evidence of vestibular schwannoma and 53 patients with idiopathic unilateral sensorineural hearing loss and normal radiological findings. The sensitivity and specificity of the hyperventilation test were compared with other audio-vestibular diagnostic tests (bedside examination of eye movements, caloric test, auditory brainstem responses) in the two groups of patients. The hyperventilation test scored the highest diagnostic efficiency (sensitivity 65.3 %; specificity 98.1 %) of the four tests in the differential diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma and idiopathic unilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Small tumors with a normal caloric response or caloric paresis were associated with ipsilateral HVN and larger tumors and severe caloric deficits with contralateral HVN. These results confirm that the hyperventilation test is a useful diagnostic test for predicting vestibular schwannoma in patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

11 Article Non-sutured fixation of the internal receiver-stimulator in cochlear implantation. 2011

Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo / Muzzi, Enrico / Barillari, Maria Rosaria / Trabalzini, Franco. ·Department of Medical and Surgical Specialities, Section of Otolaryngology, University of Padua, School of Medicine, Treviso Regional Hospital, Treviso, Italy. ·Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #21221619.

ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to describe an alternative technique to secure the receiver-stimulator of the cochlear implant to the skull with a tailored flap of periosteum. Other techniques are also reviewed and discussed. 179 consecutive patients were implanted by the same surgeon in a tertiary care setting. Age ranged from 11 months to 74 years. Patients were retrospectively evaluated for device migration. No cases of migration were observed during follow up, ranged 1-99 months with a median of 48 months. The alternative technique proposed is safe and reliable.

12 Article A superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome multicenter study: is there an association between size and symptoms? 2010

Pfammatter, Alain / Darrouzet, Vincent / Gärtner, Marcel / Somers, Thomas / Van Dinther, Joost / Trabalzini, Franco / Ayache, Denis / Linder, Thomas. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Kantonsspital Luzern, Spitalstrasse, Luzern, Switzerland. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #20118818.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this investigation was to determine if there is any association between the size of the canal dehiscences and the symptoms and signs of patients presenting with the superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective multicenter study. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Twenty-seven patients, 14 females and 13 males, aged 25 to 83 years, coming from Switzerland, France, Belgium, or Italy, with dehiscence of the superior semicircular canal diagnosed by high-resolution computed tomographic scans of the temporal bone. INTERVENTIONS: Audiologic tests, a battery of vestibular tests (Tullio phenomenon, Hennebert sign, Valsalva maneuver), vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), and high-resolution computed tomographic scans of the temporal bone. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Association between the symptoms/signs and the size of the superior canal dehiscence. RESULTS: Clinically patients could be divided into three different groups: Superior canal dehiscences (> or =2.5 mm) presented predominantly with cochleovestibular symptoms and/or signs (sensitivity, 91.7%; specificity, 70%), whereas smaller one's showed either cochlear or vestibular dysfunction. Patients with larger dehiscences were significantly more associated with vestibulocochlear symptoms/signs, lower VEMP thresholds, and objective vestibular findings (e.g., Tullio phenomenon) than subjects with smaller bony defects. No significant association between the size of the dehiscence and the audiogram pattern or individual findings could be found. The location of the dehiscence seemed to have no influence on the clinical manifestation and findings. CONCLUSION: Patients with larger superior canal dehiscences show significantly more vestibulocochlear symptoms/signs, lower VEMP thresholds, and objective vestibular findings compared with smaller ones. Smaller dehiscences mainly present with either cochlear or vestibular dysfunction.