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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Spoorthi Thammaiah
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Spoorthi Thammaiah wrote the following 4 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline A good practice guide for translating and adapting hearing-related questionnaires for different languages and cultures. 2018

Hall, Deborah A / Zaragoza Domingo, Silvia / Hamdache, Leila Z / Manchaiah, Vinaya / Thammaiah, Spoorthi / Evans, Chris / Wong, Lena L N / Anonymous12051111. ·a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre , Nottingham , UK. · b Otology and Hearing group Division of Clinical Neuroscience , School of Medicine, University of Nottingham , Nottingham , UK. · c Neuropsychological Research Organization , Barcelona , Spain. · d The Carlton Academy , Nottingham , UK. · e Department of Speech and Hearing , Lamar State University , Beaumont , TX , USA. · f Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research , Linköping University , Linköping , Sweden. · g Department of Speech and Hearing School of Allied Health Sciences , Manipal University , Manipal , India. · h Department of Audiology , All India Institute of Speech and Hearing , Mysore , India. · i Department of Psychology, University of Roehampton , London , UK , and. · j Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Faculty of Education , The University of Hong Kong, Prince Philip Dental Hospital , Hong Kong, China. ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #29161914.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To raise awareness and propose a good practice guide for translating and adapting any hearing-related questionnaire to be used for comparisons across populations divided by language or culture, and to encourage investigators to publish detailed steps. DESIGN: From a synthesis of existing guidelines, we propose important considerations for getting started, followed by six early steps: (1) Preparation, (2, 3) Translation steps, (4) Committee Review, (5) Field testing and (6) Reviewing and finalising the translation. STUDY SAMPLE: Not applicable. RESULTS: Across these six steps, 22 different items are specified for creating a questionnaire that promotes equivalence to the original by accounting for any cultural differences. Published examples illustrate how these steps have been implemented and reported, with shared experiences from the authors, members of the International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology and TINnitus research NETwork. CONCLUSIONS: A checklist of the preferred reporting items is included to help researchers and clinicians make informed choices about conducting or omitting any items. We also recommend using the checklist to document these decisions in any resulting report or publication. Following this step-by-step guide would promote quality assurance in multinational trials and outcome evaluations but, to confirm functional equivalence, large-scale evaluation of psychometric properties should follow.

2 Article Assessment of the psychometric properties of the AQoL-4D questionnaire in Kannada language for use with adults with hearing loss. 2019

Thammaiah, Spoorthi / Manchaiah, Vinaya / Krishna, Rajalakshmi / Zekveld, Adriana A / Kramer, Sophia E. ·a Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences , Lamar University , Beaumont , TX , USA. · b Speech and Hearing , Audiology India , Mysore , India. · c Department of Speech and Hearing, School of Allied Health Sciences , Manipal University , Manipal , India. · d All India Institute of Speech and Hearing , University of Mysore , Mysore , India. · e Section Ear and Hearing, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery , Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center , Amsterdam , the Netherlands. ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #31008659.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to validate the translated (Kannada language) version of the Assessment of Quality of Life-4 Dimensions (AQoL-4D) questionnaire for use in Kannada speaking adults with hearing loss. DESIGN: The study involved a cross-sectional survey design. The original (English) and the translated versions of the AQoL-4D questionnaire along with two other questionnaires, that is, the Hearing Handicap Questionnaire and the Participation Scale were self-administered by the study participants. The Kannada AQoL-4D was filled in twice by roughly 50% of the study sample in two sessions that were 15 d apart. STUDY SAMPLE: In total, 103 Kannada-English biliterate adults with hearing loss participated in the study. RESULTS: Overall analysis involved testing the factor structure and various psychometric properties including the internal consistency, discriminant validity, convergent validity and possible floor/ceiling effects. The factor analysis indicated a four-factor structure, and the overall results showed acceptable psychometric properties of the scores of the full scale. However, poor internal consistency was obtained for three out of the four subscales extracted from the questionnaire. CONCLUSION: Based on the internal consistency of the subscales, we recommend using either the full scale or only the first subscale in Kannada speaking adults with hearing loss.

3 Article The Participation Scale: psychometric properties of a South Indian translation with hearing-impaired respondents. 2018

Thammaiah, Spoorthi / Manchaiah, Vinaya / Easwar, Vijayalakshmi / Krishna, Rajalakshmi / McPherson, Bradley. ·a Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences , Lamar University , Beaumont , TX , USA. · b Audiology India , Mysore , Karnataka , India. · c Department of Behavioral Science and Learning, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research , Linköping University , Linköping , Sweden. · d Department of Speech and Hearing, School of Allied Health Sciences , Manipal University , Manipal , Karnataka , India. · e National Centre for Audiology Western University , London , ON , Canada. · f All India Institute of Speech and Hearing , University of Mysore , Mysore , Karnataka , India. · g Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Faculty of Education , The University of Hong Kong , Hong Kong , China. ·Disabil Rehabil · Pubmed #28687058.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: The Participation Scale (P-Scale) is a widely used generic self-report measure designed to assess an individual's participation restriction consequent to any disease condition. The present study aimed to evaluate the validity and reliability of a south Indian (Kannada language) version of the P-Scale for use with adults with hearing loss. This study is a part of an ongoing research program on the assessment of outcomes of hearing health rehabilitation with hearing aids involving Indian client groups. METHODS: One hundred and three adults with hearing loss completed the original English and the newly translated-adapted Kannada P-Scale questionnaire. Nearly half of the participants completed repeat testing of the Kannada version 15 days after the initial assessment. Along with the P-Scale, Kannada versions of the Hearing Handicap Questionnaire (HHQ) and the Assessment of Quality of Life - 4 Dimensions Questionnaire (AQoL-4D) were also administered. Based on predefined quality criteria, five different psychometric properties of the P-Scale were evaluated, together with an analysis of the Kannada P-Scale's factor structure. The psychometric properties assessed included internal consistency, test-retest reliability, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and floor-ceiling effects. RESULTS: Principal component analysis indicated a four-factor complex structure, which explained 69.78% of the variance in the Kannada P-Scale. High internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.90) and test-retest reliability (internal consistency coefficient  >0.90) were obtained. Comparisons with the HHQ (ρ = 0.52) and AQoL-4 D (ρ = 0.76) indicated good convergent validity. Discriminant validity among the P-Scale questions was acceptable (inter-item correlation  <0.60). Floor and ceiling effects were not evident in the Kannada P-Scale. CONCLUSIONS: The psychometric characteristics of the Kannada P-scale were found to be sufficient for use with the participant group (literate, Kannada-speaking adults with hearing loss) who were assessed in this study. Further research is required to determine generalizability of the Kannada P-Scale among other Kannada-speaking communities. Implications for Rehabilitation The Kannada version of the Participation Scale (P-Scale) can be validly used with Kannada speaking adults with hearing loss. The Kannada P-Scale can be used for clinical/research purposes to assess outcome (specifically, change in participation restriction) before, during, and after the hearing rehabilitation process. However, education and socioeconomic status may have an effect of the Kannada P-Scale results and these factors need to be further investigated prior to wider clinical use.

4 Article Psychometric properties of the hearing handicap questionnaire: a Kannada (South-Indian) translation. 2017

Thammaiah, Spoorthi / Manchaiah, Vinaya / Easwar, Vijayalakshmi / Krishna, Rajalakshmi / McPherson, Bradley. ·a Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences , Lamar University , Beaumont , TX , USA. · b Audiology India , Mysore , Karnataka , India. · c Department of Behavioral Science and Learning, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University , Linköping , Sweden. · d Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders , Western University , Ontario , Canada. · e All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, University of Mysore , Mysore , India , and. · f Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences , The University of Hong Kong , Hong Kong , China. ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #27809619.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To assess the psychometric properties of the Hearing Handicap Questionnaire (HHQ) in Kannada (a South-Indian language) among adults with hearing loss. DESIGN: The study involved a cross-sectional survey design. Participants provided demographic details and completed the Kannada and English (original) version of the HHQ questionnaire. To evaluate test-retest reliability, ∼50% of the participants completed the Kannada version for the second time after 15 days. STUDY SAMPLE: The sample comprised 103 adults with hearing loss recruited from local audiology clinics. RESULTS: Exploratory factor analysis indicated a one-factor structure, which explained 71% of the variance in Kannada-HHQ scores. The internal consistency measured with Cronbach's alpha was 0.96. The test-retest reliability correlations of the Kannada version with the English and with the same Kannada version re-administered after 15 days were 0.96 and 0.91, respectively. Convergent validity of the scale was confirmed by significant correlations with the Participation Scale and the Assessment of Quality of Life scales. Discriminant validity was found to be low as all the Kannada-HHQ questions were highly correlated with each other (r> 0.60). No floor and ceiling effects were identified. CONCLUSIONS: The psychometric properties of the Kannada-HHQ scale are considered to be adequate for clinical or research use.