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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Marcos Tatagiba
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, M. Tatagiba wrote the following 5 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Prophylactic nimodipine treatment and improvement in hearing outcome after vestibular schwannoma surgery: a combined analysis of a randomized, multicenter, Phase III trial and its pilot study. 2017

Scheller, Christian / Wienke, Andreas / Tatagiba, Marcos / Gharabaghi, Alireza / Ramina, Kristofer F / Ganslandt, Oliver / Bischoff, Barbara / Zenk, Johannes / Engelhorn, Tobias / Matthies, Cordula / Westermaier, Thomas / Antoniadis, Gregor / Pedro, Maria Teresa / Rohde, Veit / von Eckardstein, Kajetan / Kretschmer, Thomas / Kornhuber, Malte / Steighardt, Jörg / Richter, Michael / Barker, Fred G / Strauss, Christian. ·Departments of 1 Neurosurgery and. · Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Leipzig. · Institute of Medical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Informatics, and. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tübingen. · Departments of 5 Neurosurgery. · Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, and. · Neuroradiology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen. · Department of Neurosurgery, Würzburg University Hospital, Würzburg. · Department of Neurosurgery, Bezirkskrankenhaus Günzburg, University of Ulm, Günzburg. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of Göttingen; and. · Department of Neurosurgery, Evangelisches Krankenhaus, University of Oldenburg, Germany ; and. · Neurology. · Coordination Centre for Clinical Trials, University of Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale). · Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. ·J Neurosurg · Pubmed #28298021.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE In clinical routines, neuroprotective strategies in neurosurgical interventions are still missing. A pilot study (n = 30) and an analogously performed Phase III trial (n = 112) pointed to a beneficial effect of prophylactic nimodipine and hydroxyethyl starch (HES) in vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery. Considering the small sample size, the data from both studies were pooled. METHODS The patients in both investigator-initiated studies were assigned to 2 groups. The treatment group (n = 70) received parenteral nimodipine (1-2 mg/hour) and HES (hematocrit 30%-35%) from the day before surgery until the 7th postoperative day. The control group (n = 72) was not treated prophylactically. Facial and cochlear nerve functions were documented preoperatively, during the inpatient care, and 1 year after surgery. RESULTS Pooled raw data were analyzed retrospectively. Intent-to-treat analysis revealed a significantly lower risk for hearing loss (Class D) 12 months after surgery in the treatment group compared with the control group (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.22-0.97; p = 0.04). After exclusion of patients with preoperative Class D hearing, this effect was more pronounced (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.17-0.83; p = 0.016). Logistic regression analysis adjusted for tumor size showed a 4 times lower risk for hearing loss in the treatment group compared with the control group (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.09-0.63; p = 0.003). Facial nerve function was not significantly improved with treatment. Apart from dose-dependent hypotension (p < 0.001), the study medication was well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS Prophylactic nimodipine is safe and may be recommended in VS surgery to preserve hearing. Prophylactic neuroprotective treatment in surgeries in which nerves are at risk seems to be a novel and promising concept. Clinical trial registration no.: DRKS 00000328 ( https://drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/drks_web/ ).

2 Clinical Trial Stability of hearing preservation and regeneration capacity of the cochlear nerve following vestibular schwannoma surgery via a retrosigmoid approach. 2016

Scheller, Christian / Wienke, Andreas / Tatagiba, Marcos / Gharabaghi, Alireza / Ramina, Kristofer F / Ganslandt, Oliver / Bischoff, Barbara / Matthies, Cordula / Westermaier, Thomas / Antoniadis, Gregor / Pedro, Maria Teresa / Rohde, Veit / von Eckardstein, Kajetan / Kretschmer, Thomas / Zenk, Johannes / Strauss, Christian. ·Department of Neurosurgery, University of Halle-Wittenberg. · Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine (TRM), University of Leipzig. · Institute of Medical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Informatics, University of Halle-Wittenberg. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tübingen. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. · Department of Neurosurgery, Würzburg University Hospital. · Department of Neurosurgery, Bezirkskrankenhaus Günzburg, University of Ulm. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of Göttingen; and. · Department of Neurosurgery, Evangelisches Krankenhaus, University of Oldenburg, Germany. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. ·J Neurosurg · Pubmed #26824379.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE The purpose of this research was to examine the stability of long-term hearing preservation and the regeneration capacity of the cochlear nerve following vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery in a prospective study. METHODS A total of 112 patients were recruited for a randomized multicenter trial between January 2010 and April 2012 to investigate the efficacy of prophylactic nimodipine treatment versus no prophylactic nimodipine treatment in VS surgery. For the present investigation, both groups were pooled to compare hearing abilities in the early postoperative course and 1 year after the surgery. Hearing was examined using pure-tone audiometry with speech discrimination, which was performed preoperatively, in the early postoperative course, and 12 months after surgery and was subsequently classified by an independent otorhinolaryngologist using the Gardner-Robertson classification system. RESULTS Hearing abilities at 2 time points were compared by evaluation in the early postoperative course and 1 year after surgery in 102 patients. The chi-square test showed a very strong association between the 2 measurements in all 102 patients (p < 0.001) and in the subgroup of 66 patients with a preserved cochlear nerve (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS There is no significant change in cochlear nerve function between the early postoperative course and 1 year after VS surgery. The result of hearing performance, as evaluated by early postoperative audiometry after VS surgery, seems to be a reliable prognosticator for future hearing ability. Clinical trial registration nos.: 2009-012088-32 ( clinicaltrialsregister.eu ) and DRKS 00000328 ("AkNiPro," drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/drks_web/ ).

3 Article Surgery of the lateral skull base: a 50-year endeavour. 2019

Zanoletti, E / Mazzoni, A / Martini, A / Abbritti, R V / Albertini, R / Alexandre, E / Baro, V / Bartolini, S / Bernardeschi, D / Bivona, R / Bonali, M / Borghesi, I / Borsetto, D / Bovo, R / Breun, M / Calbucci, F / Carlson, M L / Caruso, A / Cayé-Thomasen, P / Cazzador, D / Champagne, P-O / Colangeli, R / Conte, G / D'Avella, D / Danesi, G / Deantonio, L / Denaro, L / Di Berardino, F / Draghi, R / Ebner, F H / Favaretto, N / Ferri, G / Fioravanti, A / Froelich, S / Giannuzzi, A / Girasoli, L / Grossardt, B R / Guidi, M / Hagen, R / Hanakita, S / Hardy, D G / Iglesias, V C / Jefferies, S / Jia, H / Kalamarides, M / Kanaan, I N / Krengli, M / Landi, A / Lauda, L / Lepera, D / Lieber, S / Lloyd, S L K / Lovato, A / Maccarrone, F / Macfarlane, R / Magnan, J / Magnoni, L / Marchioni, D / Marinelli, J P / Marioni, G / Mastronardi, V / Matthies, C / Moffat, D A / Munari, S / Nardone, M / Pareschi, R / Pavone, C / Piccirillo, E / Piras, G / Presutti, L / Restivo, G / Reznitsky, M / Roca, E / Russo, A / Sanna, M / Sartori, L / Scheich, M / Shehata-Dieler, W / Soloperto, D / Sorrentino, F / Sterkers, O / Taibah, A / Tatagiba, M / Tealdo, G / Vlad, D / Wu, H / Zanetti, D. ·Department of Neuroscience DNS, Otolaryngology Section, Padova University, Padova, Italy. · Department of Neurosurgery, Lariboisière Hospital, University of Paris Diderot, Paris, France. · Gruppo Otologico, Piacenza-Rome, Italy. · Academic Neurosurgery, Department of Neuroscience DNS, University of Padova Medical School, Padova, Italy. · Neurosurgery, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · AP-HP, Groupe Hôspital-Universitaire Pitié-Salpêtrière, Neuro-Sensory Surgical Department and NF2 Rare Disease Centre, Paris, France. · Sorbonne Université, Paris, France. · ENT and Skull-Base Surgery Department, Department of Neurosciences, Ospedale Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy. · Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Department, University Hospital of Modena, Italy. · Neurosurgery, Maria Cecilia Hospital, Cotignola (RA), Italy. · Department of Neurosurgery, Julius Maximilians University Hospital Würzburg, Bavaria, Germany. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · The Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery and Audiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Neuroscience DNS, Section of Human Anatomy, Padova University, Padova, Italy. · Department of Neuroradiology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, Italy. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Maggiore della Carità, Novara, Italy. · Department of Translational Medicine, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy. · Unit of Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milano, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, Italy. · Department of Neurosurgery, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, Germany. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Head and Neck Surgery, "Julius-Maximilians" University Hospital of Würzburg, Bavaria, Germany. · Department of Neurosurgery, Cambridge University Hospital, Cambridge, UK. · Oncology Department, Cambridge University Hospital, Cambridge, UK. · Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Shanghai Ninh People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiatong University School of Medicine, China. · Department of Neurosciences, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Alfaisal University, College of Medicine, Riyadh, KSA. · ENT & Skull-Base Department, Ospedale Nuovo di Legnano, Legnano (MI), Italy. · Department of Neuro-Otology and Skull-Base Surgery Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK. · Department of Neuroscience DNS, Audiology Unit, Padova University, Treviso, Italy. · University Aix-Marseille, France. · Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Department, University Hospital of Verona, Italy. · Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Neuro-otology and Skull Base Surgery, Cambridge University Hospital, Cambridge, UK. · ENT Department, Treviglio (BG), Italy. ·Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital · Pubmed #31130732.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Article Posterior fossa meningioma with invasion of the internal acoustic canal. 2018

Peraio, S / Ebner, F H / Tatagiba, M. ·Neurochirurgie Uniklinik Tübingen, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany. simoneperaio@virgilio.it. · Department of Neurosurgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome, Italy. simoneperaio@virgilio.it. · Neurochirurgie Uniklinik Tübingen, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany. ·Acta Neurochir (Wien) · Pubmed #30058027.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To evaluate the significance for outcome of meningioma invasion into the internal auditory canal (IAC) in posterior fossa meningiomas. METHODS: From April 2005 to September 2015, 174 posterior fossa meningiomas have been surgically treated in our Institution. Careful analysis of preoperative MRI depicted in 63 cases (36%) meningioma invasion into the IAC. A retrospective analysis was done of clinical and radiological presentation, surgical findings, outcome, and relevant prognostic factors in order to stratify the risk of complication and evaluate the surgical outcome. RESULTS: Gross total resection was achieved in 67% of patients. There was no mortality. CSF leak occurred in 5%. Postoperative moderately severe (HB 4) and severe dysfunction (HB 5) of the facial nerve was observed in 5% of patients. In 17 patients (27%), IAC was opened. Deterioration of facial function occurred in 24% of patients, hearing loss in 12%, and CSF leak in 6%. In 46 patients (73%), IAC was not opened. Deterioration of facial function occurred in 43% of patients, hearing loss in 13%, and CSF leak in 4%. Opening the IAC, a GTR was achieved in 82% while, without opening, in 61% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Meningiomas of the posterior fossa may in one-third of the cases invade the IAC. Opening of the IAC in these cases was a crucial step for increasing the GTR. Despite the minimal increased risk of transient CSF leak, IAC opening was not associated with an increased risk of facial palsy or hearing loss in comparison to non-opening the IAC.

5 Article The role of the trigeminocardiac reflex in postoperative hearing function in non-vestibular schwannoma cerebellopontine angle tumors. 2011

Acioly, Marcus André / Carvalho, Carlos Henrique / Koerbel, Andrei / Heckl, Stefan / Tatagiba, Marcos / Gharabaghi, Alireza. ·Department of Neurosurgery, Eberhard Karls University Hospital, Hoppe-Seyler Strasse 3, D-72076 Tübingen, Germany. ·J Clin Neurosci · Pubmed #21163655.

ABSTRACT: The trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR) is a common event during skull base surgery that can lead to intraoperative arterial hypotension and bradycardia. Arterial hypotension associated with TCR can be a negative prognostic factor for postoperative auditory function and ipsilateral tinnitus in patients undergoing surgery for vestibular schwannoma (VS). In this study, the contribution of TCR to postoperative auditory function in non-VS cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumor surgery was investigated. From a consecutive series of 102 patients with CPA tumors, we studied the occurrence of TCR and its influence on postoperative auditory function in patients with non-VS tumors. Pre- and postoperative auditory function, pre- and intraoperative mean arterial blood pressure, as well as preoperative medication, tumor size, and occurrence of TCR were evaluated. Of the 35 patients evaluated, four developed intraoperative TCR, of whom one was preoperatively deaf. Preoperative functional hearing was detected in 30/35 patients (85.7%): preoperative deafness was documented in one patient in the TCR group and in four patients in the non-TCR group. Of the 30 patients with preoperative functional hearing, 1/3 (33.3%) patients in the TCR group and 23/27 (85.2%) patients in the non-TCR group had functional hearing postoperatively. When patients with large tumors and functional, hearing were considered, only 33.3% of patients in the TCR group and 77.8% of patients in the non-TCR group remained within the same hearing classes following surgical treatment (p=0.1573). TCR may be a negative prognostic factor for postoperative auditory function in patients with large, non-VS CPA tumors.