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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Niels Christian Stenklev
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Niels Christian Stenklev wrote the following 4 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Hearing loss before and after cisplatin-based chemotherapy in testicular cancer survivors: a longitudinal study. 2018

Haugnes, Hege S / Stenklev, Niels Christian / Brydøy, Marianne / Dahl, Olav / Wilsgaard, Tom / Laukli, Einar / Fosså, Sophie D. ·a Department of Oncology , University Hospital of North Norway , Tromsø , Norway. · b Institute of Clinical Medicine , UIT- The Arctic University , Tromsø , Norway. · c Department of Ear, Nose and Throat , University Hospital of North Norway , Tromsø , Norway. · d Department of Oncology , Haukeland University Hospital , Bergen , Norway. · e Section of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Medicine , University of Bergen , Bergen , Norway. · f Institute of Community Medicine , UIT- The Arctic University , Tromsø , Norway. · g Division of Cancer Medicine and Radiotherapy , Oslo University Hospital , Oslo , Norway. · h Institute of Clinical Medicine , University of Oslo , Oslo , Norway. ·Acta Oncol · Pubmed #29384420.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hearing loss is a well-known long-term effect after cisplatin-based chemotherapy (CBCT) in testicular cancer survivors (TCS), but longitudinal data are sparse. We evaluate hearing loss and the impact of age in TCS treated with CBCT in this longitudinal study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty-six TCS treated with CBCT 1980-1994 with audiograms (0.25-8 kHz) pre-chemotherapy (PRE) and at a follow-up survey (SURV) after median 10 years were included (cases). Audiograms at SURV from 46 age-matched TCS without CBCT were included as controls. Linear regression was performed to evaluate predictors for change in the hearing threshold level (HTL) from PRE to SURV. Two definitions of a audiogram-defined hearing loss was applied if: (1) mean HTL for both ears exceeded 20 dB at any frequency 0.25-8 kHz (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) definition) and (2) average HTL for the frequencies 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz exceeded 20 dB (WHO-M4 definition). Self-reported hearing impairment (SURV) was assessed by a questionnaire. RESULTS: Age and cisplatin dose was significantly associated with a greater change in HTL for the frequencies 2-8 kHz. For the 8 kHz frequency, each 100 mg increase in cumulative cisplatin dose was associated with a deterioration of 3.6 dB (95% CI 1.8-5.3, p < .001). The prevalence of hearing loss (ASHA) among cases was 33% PRE, 70% at SURV and 65% among controls at SURV (cases vs. controls, p = .66). According to M4, the prevalence of hearing loss among cases was 6.5% PRE, 13% at SURV and 2.2% among controls at SURV (cases vs. controls, p = .049). Twenty-nine percent of cases, and 33% of controls (p = .70) reported hearing impairment at SURV. CONCLUSION: Cisplatin is associated with a hearing loss particularly at higher frequencies. Age appear to be an important factor for hearing loss regardless of treatment. The ASHA definition overestimates the hearing problem.

2 Article Tinnitus, Anxiety, Depression and Substance Abuse in Rock Musicians a Norwegian Survey. 2017

Stormer, Carl Christian Lein / Sorlie, Tore / Stenklev, Niels Christian. ·UiT Norges Arctic University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tromso, Norway. ·Int Tinnitus J · Pubmed #28723602.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Rock musicians are known to have an increased prevalence of hearing loss and tinnitus. The aims of the present study were to examine the distribution of anxiety and depression symptoms among rock musicians with or without tinnitus and how these mental health indicators and internal locus of control influenced upon their tinnitus symptom concerns and the degree to which the tinnitus affected their lives. DESIGN: The study was a questionnairebased cross-sectional survey of subjects selected from a cohort of rock musicians. We recruited 111 active musicians from the Oslo region, and a control group of 40 non-musicians from the student population at the University of Tromso. RESULTS: Among the rock musicians 19.8% reported permanent tinnitus vs. 0% among the controls. Musicians more often reported anxiety symptoms than controls (35.1% vs. 17.5%), however this prevalence was not different in musicians with and without tinnitus. Tinnitus-affected musicians reported depressive symptoms, significantly more than controls (13.6% vs. 5%). Rock musicians consumed more alcohol than controls, but alcohol consumption was unrelated to severity of tinnitus. Drug abuse was not more prevalent in rock musicians than in controls. Duration of tinnitus, internal locus of control, sleep disturbance and anxiety were significant predictors of how affected and how concerned musicians were about their tinnitus. CONCLUSION: Rock musicians are at risk for the development of chronic tinnitus, and they have an increased prevalence of anxiety. There is an association between chronic tinnitus and depressive symptoms in rock musicians, but our results are ambiguous. Although rock musicians have a chronic exposure to noise, noise-induced hearing loss is not the sole causative agent for the development of tinnitus.

3 Article Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in rock musicians. 2017

Høydal, Erik Harry / Lein Størmer, Carl Christian / Laukli, Einar / Stenklev, Niels Christian. ·a Faculty of Medicine , Norwegian University of Science and Technology , Trondheim , Norway. · b Institute of Clinical Medicine, UiT the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway. · c Ear, Nose and Throat Department , University Hospital of Tromsø , Tromsø , Norway. · d Ear, Nose and Throat Department , Institute of Clinical Medicine, UiT the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway , and. · e Department of Neurosurgery , Eye and ENT Diseases, University Hospital of Tromsø , Tromsø , Norway. ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #28471285.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Our focus in this study was the assessment of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) in a large group of rock musicians. A further objective was to analyse tinnitus among rock musicians as related to TEOAEs. DESIGN: The study was a cross-sectional survey of rock musicians selected at random. A control group was included at random for comparison. STUDY SAMPLE: We recruited 111 musicians and a control group of 40 non-musicians. Testing was conducted by using clinical examination, pure tone audiometry, TEOAEs and a questionnaire. RESULTS: TEOAE SNR in the half-octave frequency band centred on 4 kHz was significantly lower bilaterally in musicians than controls. This effect was strongly predicted by age and pure-tone hearing threshold levels in the 3-6 kHz range. Bilateral hearing thresholds were significantly higher at 6 kHz in musicians. Twenty percent of the musicians had permanent tinnitus. There was no association between the TEOAE parameters and permanent tinnitus. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest an incipient hearing loss at 6 kHz in rock musicians. Loss of TEOAE SNR in the 4 kHz half-octave frequency band was observed, but it was related to higher mean 3-6 kHz hearing thresholds and age. A large proportion of rock musicians have permanent tinnitus.

4 Article Hearing loss and tinnitus in rock musicians: A Norwegian survey. 2015

Størmer, Carl Christian Lein / Laukli, Einar / Høydal, Erik Harry / Stenklev, Niels Christian. ·Department of Ear, Nose and Throat, Institute of Clinical Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Tromsø, Norway. ·Noise Health · Pubmed #26572701.

ABSTRACT: Our focus in this study was to assess hearing thresholds and the prevalence and characteristics of tinnitus in a large group of rock musicians based in Norway. A further objective was to assess related factors such as exposure, instrument category, and the preventive effect of hearing protection. The study was a cross-sectional survey of rock musicians selected at random from a defined cohort of musicians. A random control group was included for comparison. We recruited 111 active musicians from the Oslo region, and a control group of 40 nonmusicians from the student population at the University of TromsØ. The subjects were investigated using clinical examination, pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, and a questionnaire. We observed a hearing loss in 37.8% of the rock musicians. Significantly poorer hearing thresholds were seen at most pure-tone frequencies in musicians than controls, with the most pronounced threshold shift at 6 kHz. The use of hearing protection, in particular custom-fitted earplugs, has a preventive effect but a minority of rock musicians apply them consistently. The degree of musical performance exposure was inversely related to the degree of hearing loss in our sample. Bass and guitar players had higher hearing thresholds than vocalists. We observed a 20% prevalence of chronic tinnitus but none of the affected musicians had severe tinnitus symptomatology. There was no statistical association between permanent tinnitus and hearing loss in our sample. We observed an increased prevalence of hearing loss and tinnitus in our sample of Norwegian rock musicians but the causal relationship between musical exposure and hearing loss or tinnitus is ambiguous. We recommend the use of hearing protection in rock musicians.