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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Gurjit Singh
Based on 14 articles published since 2010
(Why 14 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Gurjit Singh wrote the following 14 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Hearing, Emotion, Amplification, Research, and Training Workshop: Current Understanding of Hearing Loss and Emotion Perception and Priorities for Future Research. 2018

Picou, Erin M / Singh, Gurjit / Goy, Huiwen / Russo, Frank / Hickson, Louise / Oxenham, Andrew J / Buono, Gabrielle H / Ricketts, Todd A / Launer, Stefan. ·1 Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA. · 2 Phonak Canada, Mississauga, ON, Canada. · 3 Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, ON, Canada. · 4 Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada. · 5 School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. · 6 Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, MN, USA. · 7 Sonova AG, Stäfa, Switzerland. ·Trends Hear · Pubmed #30270810.

ABSTRACT: The question of how hearing loss and hearing rehabilitation affect patients' momentary emotional experiences is one that has received little attention but has considerable potential to affect patients' psychosocial function. This article is a product from the Hearing, Emotion, Amplification, Research, and Training workshop, which was convened to develop a consensus document describing research on emotion perception relevant for hearing research. This article outlines conceptual frameworks for the investigation of emotion in hearing research; available subjective, objective, neurophysiologic, and peripheral physiologic data acquisition research methods; the effects of age and hearing loss on emotion perception; potential rehabilitation strategies; priorities for future research; and implications for clinical audiologic rehabilitation. More broadly, this article aims to increase awareness about emotion perception research in audiology and to stimulate additional research on the topic.

2 Review Implications and attitudes of audiologists towards smartphone integration in hearing healthcare. 2018

Kimball, Suzanne H / Singh, Gurjit / John, Andrew B / Jenstad, Lorienne M. ·Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Allied Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, USA. Electronic address: suzanne-kimball@ouhsc.edu. · Phonak, AG, Stäfa, Switzerland; Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada; Toronto Rehabilitation Institute-University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, College of Allied Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, USA. · School of Audiology & Speech Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. ·Hear Res · Pubmed #29945802.

ABSTRACT: In a relatively short period of time, modern societies have been transformed by the ubiquitous uptake of advanced and portable mobile communication, computation, and sensors available on smartphones. Looking forward, it is anticipated that smartphones will have an increasingly important role in health management including the delivery of hearing healthcare and operation of hearing instruments. OBJECTIVE: This paper provides a brief overview of the role of smartphones in audiologic rehabilitation and hearing research and reports on the findings of a survey assessing attitudes of audiologists towards smartphone integration in hearing healthcare. DESIGN: A total of 258 audiologists working in the United States completed the 10-item survey. RESULTS: The key finding from the survey is that practitioners generally expressed a high willingness to integrate smartphone technology in patient care. Counterintuitively, it was observed that clinicians with the least number of years of experience had relatively more negative attitudes toward smartphone integration in hearing healthcare than clinicians with comparatively more years of experience. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that the attitudes of audiologists likely do not represent a barrier regarding smartphone integration in audiologic rehabilitation.

3 Review Hearing and vision screening tools for long-term care residents with dementia: protocol for a scoping review. 2016

McGilton, Katherine S / Höbler, Fiona / Campos, Jennifer / Dupuis, Kate / Labreche, Tammy / Guthrie, Dawn M / Jarry, Jonathan / Singh, Gurjit / Wittich, Walter. ·Department of Research, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute-University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Research, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute-University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Research, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute-University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Department of Audiology, Baycrest Health Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Centre for Sight Enhancement, School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Kinesiology & Physical Education and Health Sciences, Faculty of Science, Wilfrid Laurier University, Ontario, Canada. · School of Optometry, University of Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Research, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute-University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Phonak AG, Stäfa, Switzerland Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · School of Optometry, University of Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada CRIR/Centre de réadaptation MAB-Mackay du CIUSSS du Centre-Ouest-de-l'Île-de-Montréal. Montréal, Quebec, Canada CRIR/Institut Nazareth et Louis-Braille du CISSS de la Montérégie-Centre, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #27466242.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Hearing and vision loss among long-term care (LTC) residents with dementia frequently goes unnoticed and untreated. Despite negative consequences for these residents, there is little information available about their sensory abilities and care assessments and practices seldom take these abilities or accessibility needs into account. Without adequate knowledge regarding such sensory loss, it is difficult for LTC staff to determine the level of an individual's residual basic competence for communication and independent functioning. We will conduct a scoping review to identify the screening measures used in research and clinical contexts that test hearing and vision in adults aged over 65 years with dementia, aiming to: (1) provide an overview of hearing and vision screening in older adults with dementia; and (2) evaluate the sensibility of the screening tools. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This scoping review will be conducted using the framework by Arksey and O'Malley and furthered by methodological enhancements from cited researchers. We will conduct electronic database searches in CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. We will also carry out a 'grey literature' search for studies or materials not formally published, both online and through interview discussions with healthcare professionals and research clinicians working in the field. Our aim is to find new and existing hearing and vision screening measures used in research and by clinical professionals of optometry and audiology. Abstracts will be independently reviewed twice for acceptance by a multidisciplinary team of researchers and research clinicians. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This review will inform health professionals working with this growing population. With the review findings, we aim to develop a toolkit and an algorithmic process to select the most appropriate hearing and vision screening assessments for LTC residents with dementia that will facilitate accurate testing and can inform care planning, thereby improving residents' quality of life.

4 Article Correlates of Hearing Aid Use in UK Adults: Self-Reported Hearing Difficulties, Social Participation, Living Situation, Health, and Demographics. 2019

Sawyer, Chelsea S / Armitage, Christopher J / Munro, Kevin J / Singh, Gurjit / Dawes, Piers D. ·Manchester Centre for Audiology and Deafness, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. · Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, United Kingdom. ·Ear Hear · Pubmed #30664127.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Hearing impairment is ranked fifth globally for years lived with disability, yet hearing aid use is low among individuals with a hearing impairment. Identifying correlates of hearing aid use would be helpful in developing interventions to promote use. To date, however, no studies have investigated a wide range of variables, this has limited intervention development. The aim of the present study was to identify correlates of hearing aid use in adults in the United Kingdom with a hearing impairment. To address limitations in previous studies, we used a cross-sectional analysis to model a wide range of potential correlates simultaneously to provide better evidence to aid intervention development. DESIGN: The research was conducted using the UK Biobank Resource. A cross-sectional analysis of hearing aid use was conducted on 18,730 participants aged 40 to 69 years old with poor hearing, based on performance on the Digit Triplet test. RESULTS: Nine percent of adults with poor hearing in the cross-sectional sample reported using a hearing aid. The strongest correlate of hearing aid use was self-reported hearing difficulties (odds ratio [OR] = 110.69 [95% confidence interval {CI} = 65.12 to 188.16]). Individuals who were older were more likely to use a hearing aid: for each additional year of age, individuals were 5% more likely to use a hearing aid (95% CI = 1.04 to 1.06). People with tinnitus (OR = 1.43 [95% CI = 1.26 to 1.63]) and people with a chronic illness (OR = 1.97 [95% CI = 1.71 to 2.28]) were more likely to use a hearing aid. Those who reported an ethnic minority background (OR = 0.53 [95% CI = 0.39 to 0.72]) and those who lived alone (OR = 0.80 [95% CI = 0.68 to 0.94]) were less likely to use a hearing aid. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions to promote hearing aid use need to focus on addressing reasons for the perception of hearing difficulties and how to promote hearing aid use. Interventions to promote hearing aid use may need to target demographic groups that are particularly unlikely to use hearing aids, including younger adults, those who live alone and those from ethnic minority backgrounds.

5 Article A Laboratory Evaluation of Contextual Factors Affecting Ratings of Speech in Noise: Implications for Ecological Momentary Assessment. 2019

Jenstad, Lorienne M / Gillen, Lise / Singh, Gurjit / DeLongis, Anita / Pang, Flora. ·School of Audiology & Speech Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ·Ear Hear · Pubmed #30557223.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: As hearing aid outcome measures move from retrospective to momentary assessments, it is important to understand how contextual factors influence subjective ratings. Under laboratory-controlled conditions, we examined whether subjective ratings changed as a function of acoustics, response timing, and task variables. DESIGN: Eighteen adults (age 21 to 85 years; M = 51.4) with sensorineural hearing loss were fitted with hearing aids. Sentences in noise were presented at 3 overall levels (50, 65, and 80 dB SPL) and 3 signal to noise ratios (0, +5, and +10 dB signal to noise ratio [SNR]). Listeners rated three sound quality dimensions (intelligibility, noisiness, and loudness) under four experimental conditions that manipulated timing and task focus. RESULTS: The quality ratings changed as the acoustics changed: intelligibility ratings increased with input level (p < 0.05); noisiness ratings increased at poorer SNRs (p < 0.05); and loudness ratings increased as input level increased (p < 0.05). Timing of rating was significant at the highest presentation level (80 dB SPL): Participants gave higher noise ratings while listening to the signal than afterward (p < 0.05). Presence of a secondary task had no significant effect on ratings (p > 0.1). CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this laboratory study provide evidence to support the conclusion that group-mean listener ratings of loudness, noisiness, and intelligibility change in predictable ways as level and SNR of the speech in noise stimulus are altered. They also provide weak evidence to support the conclusion that timing of the ratings (during or immediately after sound exposure) can affect noisiness ratings under certain conditions, but no evidence to support the conclusion that timing affects other quality ratings. There is also no evidence to support the conclusion that quality ratings are influenced by the presence of, or focus on, a secondary nonauditory task of the type used here.

6 Article The Emotional Communication in Hearing Questionnaire (EMO-CHeQ): Development and Evaluation. 2019

Singh, Gurjit / Liskovoi, Lisa / Launer, Stefan / Russo, Frank. ·Phonak AG, Stäfa, Switzerland. · Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Canada. · School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. ·Ear Hear · Pubmed #29894380.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this research were to develop and evaluate a self-report questionnaire (the Emotional Communication in Hearing Questionnaire or EMO-CHeQ) designed to assess experiences of hearing and handicap when listening to signals that contain vocal emotion information. DESIGN: Study 1 involved internet-based administration of a 42-item version of the EMO-CHeQ to 586 adult participants (243 with self-reported normal hearing [NH], 193 with self-reported hearing impairment but no reported use of hearing aids [HI], and 150 with self-reported hearing impairment and use of hearing aids [HA]). To better understand the factor structure of the EMO-CHeQ and eliminate redundant items, an exploratory factor analysis was conducted. Study 2 involved laboratory-based administration of a 16-item version of the EMO-CHeQ to 32 adult participants (12 normal hearing/near normal hearing (NH/nNH), 10 HI, and 10 HA). In addition, participants completed an emotion-identification task under audio and audiovisual conditions. RESULTS: In study 1, the exploratory factor analysis yielded an interpretable solution with four factors emerging that explained a total of 66.3% of the variance in performance the EMO-CHeQ. Item deletion resulted in construction of the 16-item EMO-CHeQ. In study 1, both the HI and HA group reported greater vocal emotion communication handicap on the EMO-CHeQ than on the NH group, but differences in handicap were not observed between the HI and HA group. In study 2, the same pattern of reported handicap was observed in individuals with audiometrically verified hearing as was found in study 1. On the emotion-identification task, no group differences in performance were observed in the audiovisual condition, but group differences were observed in the audio alone condition. Although the HI and HA group exhibited similar emotion-identification performance, both groups performed worse than the NH/nNH group, thus suggesting the presence of behavioral deficits that parallel self-reported vocal emotion communication handicap. The EMO-CHeQ was significantly and strongly (r = -0.64) correlated with performance on the emotion-identification task for listeners with hearing impairment. CONCLUSIONS: The results from both studies suggest that the EMO-CHeQ appears to be a reliable and ecologically valid measure to rapidly assess experiences of hearing and handicap when listening to signals that contain vocal emotion information.

7 Article Hearing Aids Benefit Recognition of Words in Emotional Speech but Not Emotion Identification. 2018

Goy, Huiwen / Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen / Singh, Gurjit / Russo, Frank A. ·1 Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 2 University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 3 Phonak AG, Stäfa, Switzerland. · 4 Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 5 Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·Trends Hear · Pubmed #30249171.

ABSTRACT: Vocal emotion perception is an important part of speech communication and social interaction. Although older adults with normal audiograms are known to be less accurate at identifying vocal emotion compared to younger adults, little is known about how older adults with hearing loss perceive vocal emotion or whether hearing aids improve the perception of emotional speech. In the main experiment, older hearing aid users were presented with sentences spoken in seven emotion conditions, with and without their own hearing aids. Listeners reported the words that they heard as well as the emotion portrayed in each sentence. The use of hearing aids improved word-recognition accuracy in quiet from 38.1% (unaided) to 65.1% (aided) but did not significantly change emotion-identification accuracy (36.0% unaided, 41.8% aided). In a follow-up experiment, normal-hearing young listeners were tested on the same stimuli. Normal-hearing younger listeners and older listeners with hearing loss showed similar patterns in how emotion affected word-recognition performance but different patterns in how emotion affected emotion-identification performance. In contrast to the present findings, previous studies did not find age-related differences between younger and older normal-hearing listeners in how emotion affected emotion-identification performance. These findings suggest that there are changes to emotion identification caused by hearing loss that are beyond those that can be attributed to normal aging, and that hearing aids do not compensate for these changes.

8 Article TV listening and hearing aids. 2018

Strelcyk, Olaf / Singh, Gurjit. ·Sonova U.S. Corporate Services, Warrenville, Illinois, United States of America. · Phonak Canada Ltd, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Toronto Rehabilitation Institute - University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #29958299.

ABSTRACT: TV listening plays a large role in the lives of hearing-impaired (HI) individuals. Yet, few studies have examined TV listening in this group. In this paper, we report the findings of an online survey on TV listening conducted among HI individuals with and without hearing aids (HAs) in the United States in 2015. The research investigated if and in what form TV listening experiences of unaided and aided HI individuals might differ with regard to their viewing habits, difficulties they experience, and compensation strategies they employ. 515 HI people of ages 50+ years participated, 260 of whom owned HAs. HA users reported that they watched TV or video on average for 6 hours 10 min per day, 57 minutes longer than the duration reported by non-HA owners. Furthermore, HA users indicated fewer difficulties when watching TV than non-HA owners, suggesting that HA usage alleviated difficulties with TV listening. Nevertheless, the most frequent problems were still encountered by more than 39% of the HA users. Difficulties increased with greater self-reported unaided hearing disability, and female participants indicated more problems than male participants. Finally, those with carpeted floors reported fewer difficulties than those without carpets. The most frequently used compensation strategies were changing TV or HA volumes and using closed captioning. Only few HA users used audio streaming accessories. Given the exploratory nature of this study, further research is needed to inform interventions and improve the TV listening experiences of HI viewers.

9 Article Time of Day and Hearing Aid Adoption. 2018

Singh, Gurjit / Launer, Stefan. ·1 Phonak Canada, Mississauga, Canada. · 2 Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · 3 Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada. · 4 Toronto Rehabilitation Institute-University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. · 5 Sonova Holding AG, Stðfa, Switzerland. · 6 School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. ·Trends Hear · Pubmed #29708064.

ABSTRACT: To date, there is little understanding of how contextual factors may influence the decisions individuals make regarding the adoption of options for hearing rehabilitation. This explorative retrospective study investigated whether hearing aid adoption and return rates are associated with the time of the day at which an appointment takes place. The study sample consisted of 24,842 patients experiencing their first audiology appointment. It was observed that hearing aid adoption was significantly associated with appointment times whereby lower hearing aid adoption rates were observed at noon and 4 p.m. It was also observed that hearing aid return rates were significantly associated with appointment times whereby lower return rates were observed at noon and 4 p.m. In light of the methodology employed in the study, it is not possible to unequivocally determine why time of day is associated with hearing aid adoption and return rates. Several possible explanations for the patterns of associations are discussed. In light of previous research observing that hunger lowers risk tolerance and glucose consumption increases risk tolerance, the results are consistent with an interpretation based on risk-aversion resulting from hunger. To establish causality between hunger and decision-making in audiology, additional research employing experimental methodologies are necessary.

10 Article Effects of Hearing Loss on Dual-Task Performance in an Audiovisual Virtual Reality Simulation of Listening While Walking. 2016

Lau, Sin Tung / Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen / Li, Karen Z H / Singh, Gurjit / Campos, Jennifer L. ·Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON, Canada. · Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Centre de Recherche en Développement Humain, Montreal, QC, Canada. · Department of Psychology, Concordia University, Montreal, QC, Canada. · Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Phonak Canada Ltd., Mississauga, ON, Canada. ·J Am Acad Audiol · Pubmed #27406663.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Most activities of daily living require the dynamic integration of sights, sounds, and movements as people navigate complex environments. Nevertheless, little is known about the effects of hearing loss (HL) or hearing aid (HA) use on listening during multitasking challenges. PURPOSE: The objective of the current study was to investigate the effect of age-related hearing loss (ARHL) on word recognition accuracy in a dual-task experiment. Virtual reality (VR) technologies in a specialized laboratory (Challenging Environment Assessment Laboratory) were used to produce a controlled and safe simulated environment for listening while walking. RESEARCH DESIGN: In a simulation of a downtown street intersection, participants completed two single-task conditions, listening-only (standing stationary) and walking-only (walking on a treadmill to cross the simulated intersection with no speech presented), and a dual-task condition (listening while walking). For the listening task, they were required to recognize words spoken by a target talker when there was a competing talker. For some blocks of trials, the target talker was always located at 0° azimuth (100% probability condition); for other blocks, the target talker was more likely (60% of trials) to be located at the center (0° azimuth) and less likely (40% of trials) to be located at the left (270° azimuth). STUDY SAMPLE: The participants were eight older adults with bilateral HL (mean age = 73.3 yr, standard deviation [SD] = 8.4; three males) who wore their own HAs during testing and eight controls with normal hearing (NH) thresholds (mean age = 69.9 yr, SD = 5.4; two males). No participant had clinically significant visual, cognitive, or mobility impairments. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Word recognition accuracy and kinematic parameters (head and trunk angles, step width and length, stride time, cadence) were analyzed using mixed factorial analysis of variances with group as a between-subjects factor. Task condition (single versus dual) and probability (100% versus 60%) were within-subject factors. In analyses of the 60% listening condition, spatial expectation (likely versus unlikely) was a within-subject factor. Differences between groups in age and baseline measures of hearing, mobility, and cognition were tested using t tests. RESULTS: The NH group had significantly better word recognition accuracy than the HL group. Both groups performed better when the probability was higher and the target location more likely. For word recognition, dual-task costs for the HL group did not depend on condition, whereas the NH group demonstrated a surprising dual-task benefit in conditions with lower probability or spatial expectation. For the kinematic parameters, both groups demonstrated a more upright and less variable head position and more variable trunk position during dual-task conditions compared to the walking-only condition, suggesting that safe walking was prioritized. The HL group demonstrated more overall stride time variability than the NH group. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides new knowledge about the effects of ARHL, HA use, and aging on word recognition when individuals also perform a mobility-related task that is typically experienced in everyday life. This research may help inform the development of more effective function-based approaches to assessment and intervention for people who are hard-of-hearing.

11 Article Social Support Predicts Hearing Aid Satisfaction. 2015

Singh, Gurjit / Lau, Sin-Tung / Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen. ·1Phonak Canada Ltd, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada; 2Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 3Department of Research, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; and 4Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. ·Ear Hear · Pubmed #26035144.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The goals of the current research were to determine: (1) whether there is a relationship between perceived social support and hearing aid satisfaction, and (2) how well perceived social support predicts hearing aid satisfaction relative to other correlates previously identified in the literature. DESIGN: In study 1, 173 adult ((Equation is included in full-text article.)age = 68.9 years; SD = 13.4) users of hearing aids completed a survey assessing attitudes toward health, hearing, and hearing aids, as well as a questionnaire assessing Big-Five personality factors (Openness to Experience, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism) either using paper and pencil or the Internet. In a follow-up study designed to replicate and extend the results from study 1, 161 adult ((Equation is included in full-text article.)age = 32.8 years; SD = 13.3) users of hearing aids completed a similar survey on the Internet. In study 2, participants also completed a measure of hearing aid benefit and reported the style of their hearing aid. RESULTS: In studies 1 and 2, perceived social support was significantly correlated with hearing aid satisfaction (respectively, r = 0.34, r = 0.51, ps < 0.001). The results of a regression analysis revealed that in study 1, 22% of the variance in hearing aid satisfaction scores was predicted by perceived social support, satisfaction with one's hearing health care provider, duration of daily hearing aid use, and openness. In study 2, 43% of the variance in hearing aid satisfaction was predicted by perceived social support, hearing aid benefit, neuroticism, and hearing aid style. Overall, perceived social support was the best predictor of hearing aid satisfaction in both studies. After controlling for response style (i.e., acquiescence or the tendency to respond positively), the correlation between perceived social support and hearing aid satisfaction remained the same in study 1 (r = 0.34, p < 0.001) and was lower in study 2 (r = 0.39, p < 0.001), although the change in correlation was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: The results from study 1 provide evidence to suggest that perceived social support is a significant predictor of satisfaction with hearing aids, a finding that was replicated in a different sample of participants investigated in study 2. A significant relationship between perceived social support and hearing aid satisfaction was observed in both studies, even though the composition of the two samples differed in terms of age, relationship status, income, proportion of individuals with unilateral versus bilateral hearing impairment, and lifetime experience with hearing aids. The results from both studies 1 and 2 provide no support for the claim that participant response style accounts for the relationship between hearing aid satisfaction and perceived social support.

12 Article Effects of hearing and vision impairments on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment. 2015

Dupuis, Kate / Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen / Chasteen, Alison L / Marchuk, Veronica / Singh, Gurjit / Smith, Sherri L. ·a Department of Psychology , University of Toronto , Toronto , ON , Canada. ·Neuropsychol Dev Cogn B Aging Neuropsychol Cogn · Pubmed #25325767.

ABSTRACT: Many standardized measures of cognition include items that must be seen or heard. Nevertheless, it is not uncommon to overlook the possible effects of sensory impairment(s) on test scores. In the current study, we investigated whether sensory impairments could affect performance on a widely used screening tool, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Three hundred and one older adults (mean age = 71 years) completed the MoCA and also hearing and vision tests. Half of the participants had normal hearing and vision, 38% impaired hearing, 5% impaired vision, and 7% had dual-sensory impairment. More participants with normal sensory acuity passed the MoCA compared to those with sensory loss, even after modifying scores to adjust for sensory factors. The results suggest that cognitive abilities may be underestimated if sensory problems are not considered and that people with sensory loss are at greater risk of cognitive decline.

13 Article Age affects responses on the Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ) by adults with minimal audiometric loss. 2012

Banh, Jessica / Singh, Gurjit / Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen. ·Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. ·J Am Acad Audiol · Pubmed #22353676.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Age-related declines in auditory and cognitive processing may contribute to the difficulties with listening in noise that are often reported by older adults. Such difficulties are reported even by those who have relatively good audiograms that could be considered "normal" for their age (ISO 7029-2000 [ISO, 2000]). The Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ; Gatehouse and Noble, 2004) is a questionnaire developed to measure a listener's self-reported ability to hear in a variety of everyday situations, such as those that are challenging for older adults, and it can provide insights into the possible contributions of auditory and cognitive factors to their listening difficulties. The SSQ has been shown to be a sensitive and reliable questionnaire to detect benefits associated with the use of different hearing technologies and potentially other forms of intervention. Establishing how age-matched listeners with audiograms "normal" for their age rate the items on the SSQ could enable an extension of its use in audiological assessment and in setting rehabilitative goals. PURPOSE: The main purpose of this study was to investigate how younger and older adults who passed audiometric screening and who had thresholds considered to be "normal" for their age responded on the SSQ. It was also of interest to compare these results to those reported previously for older listeners with hearing loss in an attempt to tease out the relative effects of age and hearing loss. STUDY SAMPLE: The SSQ was administered to 48 younger (mean age = 19 yr; SD = 1.0) and 48 older (mean age = 70 yr, SD = 4.1) adults with clinically normal audiometric thresholds below 4 kHz. The younger adults were recruited through an introductory psychology course, and the older adults were volunteers from the local community. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Both age groups completed the SSQ. The differences between the groups were analyzed. Correlations were used to compare the pattern of results across items for the two age groups in the present study and to assess the relationship between SSQ scores and objective measures of hearing. Comparisons were also made to published results for older adults with hearing loss. RESULTS: The pattern of reported difficulty across items was similar for both age groups, but younger adults had significantly higher scores than older adults on 42 of the 46 items. On average, younger adults scored 8.8 (SD = 0.6) out of 10 and older adults scored 7.7 (SD = 1.2) out of 10. By comparison, scores of 5.5 (SD = 1.9) have been reported for older adults (mean age = 71 yr, SD = 8.1) with moderate hearing loss (Gatehouse and Noble, 2004). CONCLUSIONS: By establishing the best scores that could reasonably be expected from younger and older adults with "normal" hearing thresholds, these results provide clinicians with information that should assist them in setting realistic targets for interventions for adults of different ages.

14 Article Older adults’ performance on the speech, spatial, and qualities of hearing scale (SSQ): Test-retest reliability and a comparison of interview and self-administration methods. 2010

Singh, Gurjit / Kathleen Pichora-Fuller, M. ·Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Mississauga, Canada; and Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Canada. gurjit@psych.utoronto.ca ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #20874047.

ABSTRACT: The purposes of the study were to examine the test-retest properties of the speech, spatial, and qualities of hearing scale (SSQ) and to determine if the method of test administration affected these properties. Four groups of 40 older adult participants completed the SSQ twice at an interval of about a half year, using either the same or different administration methods at the two test times. The SSQ was administered using an interview method and/or it was self-administered and then returned by mail. Although the method of test administration did not systematically affect scores on the SSQ, the highest test-retest correlation (r = 0.83) was observed using the interview method at both test times, making it the best choice for the purpose of demonstrating the effectiveness of interventions. The other three combinations of dual-administration in this study also provided reliable results and may be preferable because the self-administration method is less time-consuming and labour-intensive.