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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Joseph Sanfilippo
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Joseph Sanfilippo wrote the following 2 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Impact of Consistency in Daily Device Use on Speech Perception Abilities in Children with Cochlear Implants: Datalogging Evidence. 2018

Easwar, Vijayalakshmi / Sanfilippo, Joseph / Papsin, Blake / Gordon, Karen. ·Archie's Cochlear Implant Laboratory, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Collaborative Program in Neuroscience, The University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Otolaryngology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Otolaryngology, The University of Toronto, Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. ·J Am Acad Audiol · Pubmed #30278868.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cochlear implants (CIs) give children with severe to profound hearing loss access to sound. There appears to be a dose effect of sound exposure on speech perception abilities as shown by the positive influence of early implantation and CI experience. The consistency in device use per day could also affect sound dose, potentially affecting perceptual abilities in children with CIs. PURPOSE: The objectives of the present study were to identify the impact of consistency in device use on: (1) speech perception abilities and (2) asymmetry in speech perception abilities between bilateral CIs. RESEARCH DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. STUDY SAMPLE: To achieve the first objective, data from 65 children (age range at speech test: 1.91-18.05 yrs) with one (unilaterally implanted or bimodal) or two CIs (sequentially or simultaneously implanted) were included. A subset of data from 40 children with bilateral CIs was included to achieve the second objective. Of the 40 children with two CIs, 15 received their CIs sequentially. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Device use information was extracted from datalogs stored in personal speech processors using custom software. Speech perception scores per CI collected in quiet were also evaluated. Multiple regression was used to assess the impact of daily CI use, while controlling for factors previously identified to affect speech perception: age at speech test, length of pre-CI (acoustic) hearing experience, length of CI hearing experience, and order of CI for the first objective, and CI category (simultaneous/sequential implantation), interimplant delay, and length of CI experience for the second objective. RESULTS: On average, children wore their CIs for 11.59 ± 2.86 hours/day and, with one CI, exhibited 65.07 ± 22.64% accuracy on speech perception tests. Higher monaural speech perception scores were associated with longer everyday CI use and CI experience (p < 0.05). Among children with bilateral CIs, those with simultaneously implanted CIs and similar bilateral hearing experience demonstrated a small but significant right ear advantage with higher speech perception scores when using the right rather than left CI (mean difference = 4.55 ± 9.83%). The asymmetry in speech perception between CIs was larger and more variable in children who received their CIs sequentially (mean difference CI1-CI2 = 27.48 ± 24.87%). These asymmetries decreased with longer/consistent everyday use of the newer CI (p < 0.05). Yet, despite consistent everyday device use of the second CI (>12 hours/day), only a small proportion of children implanted sequentially (one out of seven children) achieved symmetrical function similar to children with simultaneously received bilateral CIs. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent everyday CI use contributes to higher speech perception scores. Although consistent CI use can help reduce the asymmetry in speech perception abilities of children with sequentially implanted CIs subsequent to interimplant delay, residual asymmetry often persists.

2 Article Factors Affecting Daily Cochlear Implant Use in Children: Datalogging Evidence. 2016

Easwar, Vijayalakshmi / Sanfilippo, Joseph / Papsin, Blake / Gordon, Karen. ·Archie's Cochlear Implant Laboratory, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Collaborative Program in Neuroscience, The University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Otolaryngology, The University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Otolaryngology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada. ·J Am Acad Audiol · Pubmed #27885978.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Children with profound hearing loss can gain access to sound through cochlear implants (CIs), but these devices must be worn consistently to promote auditory development. Although subjective parent reports have identified several factors limiting long-term CI use in children, it is also important to understand the day-to-day issues which may preclude consistent device use. In the present study, objective measures gathered through datalogging software were used to quantify the following in children: (1) number of hours of CI use per day, (2) practical concerns including repeated disconnections between the external transmission coil and the internal device (termed "coil-offs"), and (3) listening environments experienced during daily use. PURPOSE: This study aimed to (1) objectively measure daily CI use and factors influencing consistent device use in children using one or two CIs and (2) evaluate the intensity levels and types of listening environments children are exposed to during daily CI use. RESEARCH DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. STUDY SAMPLE: Measures of daily CI use were obtained from 146 pediatric users of Cochlear Nucleus 6 speech processors. The sample included 5 unilateral, 40 bimodal, and 101 bilateral CI users (77 simultaneously and 24 sequentially implanted). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Daily CI use, duration, and frequency of coil-offs per day, and the time spent in multiple intensity ranges and environment types were extracted from the datalog saved during clinic appointments. Multiple regression analyses were completed to predict daily CI use based on child-related demographic variables, and to evaluate the effects of age on coil-offs and environment acoustics. RESULTS: Children used their CIs for 9.86 ± 3.43 hr on average on a daily basis, with use exceeding 9 hr per day in ∼64% of the children. Daily CI use reduced significantly with increasing durations of coil-off (p = 0.027) and increased significantly with longer CI experience (p < 0.001) and pre-CI acoustic experience (p < 0.001), when controlled for the child's age. Total time in sound (sum of CI and pre-CI experience) was positively correlated with CI use (r = 0.72, p < 0.001). Longer durations of coil-off were associated with higher frequency of coil-offs (p < 0.001). The frequency of coil-offs ranged from 0.99 to 594.10 times per day and decreased significantly with age (p < 0.001). Daily CI use and frequency of coil-offs did not vary significantly across known etiologies. Listening environments of all children typically ranged between 50 and 70 dBA. Children of all ages were exposed to speech in noisy environments. Environment classified as "music" was identified more often in younger children. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of children use their CIs consistently, even during the first year of implantation. The frequency of coil-offs is a practical challenge in infants and young children, and demonstrates the need for improved coil retention methods for pediatric use. Longer hearing experience and shorter coil-off time facilitates consistent CI use. Children are listening to speech in noisy environments most often, thereby indicating a need for better access to binaural cues, signal processing, and stimulation strategies to aid listening. Study findings could be useful in parent counseling of young and/or new CI users.