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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Pablo J. Sanchez
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Pablo J. Sánchez wrote the following 4 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Editorial Encouraging postnatal cytomegalovirus (CMV) screening: the time is NOW for universal screening! 2017

Ronchi, Andrea / Shimamura, Masako / Malhotra, Prashant S / Sánchez, Pablo J. ·a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health , Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Università degli Studi di Milano , Milan , Italy. · b Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Center for Vaccines and Immunity , The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine , Columbus , OH , USA. · c Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery , Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine , Columbus , OH , USA. · d Divisions of Neonatology and Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Center for Perinatal Research, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital ; Nationwide Children's Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine , Columbus , OH , USA. ·Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther · Pubmed #28277819.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Clinical Trial Blood Viral Load in Symptomatic Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection. 2019

Marsico, Concetta / Aban, Immaculada / Kuo, Huichien / James, Scott H / Sanchez, Pablo J / Ahmed, Amina / Arav-Boger, Ravit / Michaels, Marian G / Ashouri, Negar / Englund, Janet A / Estrada, Benjamin / Jacobs, Richard F / Romero, José R / Sood, Sunil K / Whitworth, Suzanne / Jester, Penelope M / Whitley, Richard J / Kimberlin, David W / Anonymous2311116. ·Neonatology Unit, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Italy. · Department of Biostatistics, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Alabama at Birmingham. · Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Alabama at Birmingham. · Department of Pediatrics, Divisions of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Neonatology, Nationwide Children's Hospital - Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus. · Department of Pediatrics, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. · Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pennsylvania. · Infectious Diseases, CHOC Children's Hospital, Orange, California. · University of Washington/Seattle Children's Hospital. · University of South Alabama, Mobile. · University of Arkansas, Little Rock. · Steven and Alexandra Cohen Children's Medical Center, New Hyde Park, New York. · Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, Texas. ·J Infect Dis · Pubmed #30535363.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Viral loads (VLs) frequently are followed during treatment of symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus disease, but their predictive value is unclear. METHODS: Post hoc analysis of 2 antiviral studies was performed. Seventy-three subjects were treated for 6 weeks and 47 subjects were treated for 6 months. Whole blood VL was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction before and during therapy. RESULTS: Higher baseline VL was associated with central nervous system involvement (3.82 log, range 1-5.65 vs 3.32 log, range 1-5.36; P = .001), thrombocytopenia (3.68 log, range 1-5.65 vs 3.43 log, range 1-5.36; P = .03), and transaminitis at presentation (3.73 log, range 1-5.60 vs 3.39 log, range 1-5.65; P = .009), but with overlap in the amount of virus detected between groups. In subjects treated for 6 months, lower VL at presentation correlated with better hearing outcomes at 12 months, but VL breakpoints predictive of hearing loss were not identified. Sustained viral suppression during 6 months of therapy correlated with better hearing outcomes at 6, 12, and 24 months (P = .01, P = .0007, P = .04), but a majority without viral suppression still had improved hearing. CONCLUSIONS: In infants with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus disease, higher whole blood VL before initiation of antiviral therapy has no clinically meaningful predictive value for long-term outcomes.

3 Article Newborn Dried Blood Spot Polymerase Chain Reaction to Identify Infants with Congenital Cytomegalovirus-Associated Sensorineural Hearing Loss. 2017

Ross, Shannon A / Ahmed, Amina / Palmer, April L / Michaels, Marian G / Sánchez, Pablo J / Stewart, Audra / Bernstein, David I / Feja, Kristina / Fowler, Karen B / Boppana, Suresh B / Anonymous5950897. ·Department of Pediatrics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL; Department of Microbiology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL. · Department of Pediatrics, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC. · Department of Pediatrics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS. · Department of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh and the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA. · Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University and Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH. · Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX. · Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH. · Saint Peter's University Hospital, New Brunswick, NJ. · Department of Pediatrics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL; Department of Epidemiology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL. ·J Pediatr · Pubmed #28237380.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the utility of dried blood spot (DBS) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in identifying infants with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection-associated sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). STUDY DESIGN: Newborns at 7 US hospitals between March 2007 and March 2012 were screened for CMV by saliva rapid culture and/or PCR. Infected infants were monitored for SNHL during the first 4 years of life to determine sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios of DBS PCR for identifying CMV-associated SNHL. RESULTS: DBS at birth was positive in 11 of 26 children (42%) with SNHL at age 4 years and in 72 of 270 children (27%) with normal hearing (P = .11). The sensitivity (42.3%; 95% CI, 23.4%-63.1%) and specificity (73.3%; 95% CI, 67.6%-78.5%) was low for DBS PCR in identifying children with SNHL at age 4 years. The positive and negative likelihood ratios of DBS PCR positivity to detect CMV-associated SNHL at age 4 years were 1.6 (95% CI, 0.97-2.6) and 0.8 (95% CI, 0.6-1.1), respectively. There was no difference in DBS viral loads between children with SNHL and those without SNHL. CONCLUSIONS: DBS PCR for CMV has low sensitivity and specificity for identifying infants with CMV-associated hearing loss. These findings, together with previous reports, demonstrate that DBS PCR does not identify either the majority of CMV-infected newborns or those with CMV-associated SNHL early in life.

4 Article Valganciclovir for symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus disease. 2015

Kimberlin, David W / Jester, Penelope M / Sánchez, Pablo J / Ahmed, Amina / Arav-Boger, Ravit / Michaels, Marian G / Ashouri, Negar / Englund, Janet A / Estrada, Benjamin / Jacobs, Richard F / Romero, José R / Sood, Sunil K / Whitworth, M Suzanne / Abzug, Mark J / Caserta, Mary T / Fowler, Sandra / Lujan-Zilbermann, Jorge / Storch, Gregory A / DeBiasi, Roberta L / Han, Jin-Young / Palmer, April / Weiner, Leonard B / Bocchini, Joseph A / Dennehy, Penelope H / Finn, Adam / Griffiths, Paul D / Luck, Suzanne / Gutierrez, Kathleen / Halasa, Natasha / Homans, James / Shane, Andi L / Sharland, Michael / Simonsen, Kari / Vanchiere, John A / Woods, Charles R / Sabo, Diane L / Aban, Inmaculada / Kuo, Huichien / James, Scott H / Prichard, Mark N / Griffin, Jill / Giles, Dusty / Acosta, Edward P / Whitley, Richard J / Anonymous4730822. ·The authors' affiliations are listed in the Appendix. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #25738669.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The treatment of symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease with intravenous ganciclovir for 6 weeks has been shown to improve audiologic outcomes at 6 months, but the benefits wane over time. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of valganciclovir therapy in neonates with symptomatic congenital CMV disease, comparing 6 months of therapy with 6 weeks of therapy. The primary end point was the change in hearing in the better ear ("best-ear" hearing) from baseline to 6 months. Secondary end points included the change in hearing from baseline to follow-up at 12 and 24 months and neurodevelopmental outcomes, with each end point adjusted for central nervous system involvement at baseline. RESULTS: A total of 96 neonates underwent randomization, of whom 86 had follow-up data at 6 months that could be evaluated. Best-ear hearing at 6 months was similar in the 6-month group and the 6-week group (2 and 3 participants, respectively, had improvement; 36 and 37 had no change; and 5 and 3 had worsening; P=0.41). Total-ear hearing (hearing in one or both ears that could be evaluated) was more likely to be improved or to remain normal at 12 months in the 6-month group than in the 6-week group (73% vs. 57%, P=0.01). The benefit in total-ear hearing was maintained at 24 months (77% vs. 64%, P=0.04). At 24 months, the 6-month group, as compared with the 6-week group, had better neurodevelopmental scores on the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, third edition, on the language-composite component (P=0.004) and on the receptive-communication scale (P=0.003). Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia occurred in 19% of the participants during the first 6 weeks. During the next 4.5 months of the study, grade 3 or 4 neutropenia occurred in 21% of the participants in the 6-month group and in 27% of those in the 6-week group (P=0.64). CONCLUSIONS: Treating symptomatic congenital CMV disease with valganciclovir for 6 months, as compared with 6 weeks, did not improve hearing in the short term but appeared to improve hearing and developmental outcomes modestly in the longer term. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00466817.).