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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Richard M. Rosenfeld
Based on 8 articles published since 2009
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Richard M. Rosenfeld wrote the following 8 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Clinical practice guideline: tinnitus executive summary. 2014

Tunkel, David E / Bauer, Carol A / Sun, Gordon H / Rosenfeld, Richard M / Chandrasekhar, Sujana S / Cunningham, Eugene R / Archer, Sanford M / Blakley, Brian W / Carter, John M / Granieri, Evelyn C / Henry, James A / Hollingsworth, Deena / Khan, Fawad A / Mitchell, Scott / Monfared, Ashkan / Newman, Craig W / Omole, Folashade S / Phillips, C Douglas / Robinson, Shannon K / Taw, Malcolm B / Tyler, Richard S / Waguespack, Richard / Whamond, Elizabeth J. ·Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA dtunkel@jhmi.edu. · Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois, USA. · Partnership for Health Analytic Research, LLC, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA. · New York Otology, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Research and Quality Improvement, American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, Alexandria, Virginia, USA. · Divisions of Rhinology & Sinus Surgery and Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. · Department of Otolaryngology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. · Division of Geriatric Medicine and Aging, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA. · National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA. · ENT Specialists of Northern Virginia, Falls Church, Virginia, USA. · Ochsner Health System, Kenner, Louisiana, USA. · Mitchell & Cavallo, P.C., Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Otology and Neurotology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. · Department of Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Morehouse School of Medicine, East Point, Georgia, USA. · Department of Head and Neck Imaging, Weill Cornell Medical Center, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. · Department of Medicine, UCLA Center for East-West Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. · Consumers United for Evidence-based Healthcare, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #25274374.

ABSTRACT: The American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Tinnitus. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 13 recommendations developed address the evaluation of patients with tinnitus, including selection and timing of diagnostic testing and specialty referral to identify potential underlying treatable pathology. It will then focus on the evaluation and treatment of patients with persistent primary tinnitus, with recommendations to guide the evaluation and measurement of the impact of tinnitus and to determine the most appropriate interventions to improve symptoms and quality of life for tinnitus sufferers.

2 Guideline Clinical practice guideline: Tympanostomy tubes in children. 2013

Rosenfeld, Richard M / Schwartz, Seth R / Pynnonen, Melissa A / Tunkel, David E / Hussey, Heather M / Fichera, Jeffrey S / Grimes, Alison M / Hackell, Jesse M / Harrison, Melody F / Haskell, Helen / Haynes, David S / Kim, Tae W / Lafreniere, Denis C / LeBlanc, Katie / Mackey, Wendy L / Netterville, James L / Pipan, Mary E / Raol, Nikhila P / Schellhase, Kenneth G. ·Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York 11201, USA. richrosenfeld@msn.com ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #23818543.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Insertion of tympanostomy tubes is the most common ambulatory surgery performed on children in the United States. Tympanostomy tubes are most often inserted because of persistent middle ear fluid, frequent ear infections, or ear infections that persist after antibiotic therapy. Despite the frequency of tympanostomy tube insertion, there are currently no clinical practice guidelines in the United States that address specific indications for surgery. This guideline is intended for any clinician involved in managing children, aged 6 months to 12 years, with tympanostomy tubes or being considered for tympanostomy tubes in any care setting, as an intervention for otitis media of any type. PURPOSE: The primary purpose of this clinical practice guideline is to provide clinicians with evidence-based recommendations on patient selection and surgical indications for and management of tympanostomy tubes in children. The development group broadly discussed indications for tube placement, perioperative management, care of children with indwelling tubes, and outcomes of tympanostomy tube surgery. Given the lack of current published guidance on surgical indications, the group focused on situations in which tube insertion would be optional, recommended, or not recommended. Additional emphasis was placed on opportunities for quality improvement, particularly regarding shared decision making and care of children with existing tubes. ACTION STATEMENTS: The development group made a strong recommendation that clinicians should prescribe topical antibiotic eardrops only, without oral antibiotics, for children with uncomplicated acute tympanostomy tube otorrhea. The panel made recommendations that (1) clinicians should not perform tympanostomy tube insertion in children with a single episode of otitis media with effusion (OME) of less than 3 months' duration; (2) clinicians should obtain an age-appropriate hearing test if OME persists for 3 months or longer (chronic OME) or prior to surgery when a child becomes a candidate for tympanostomy tube insertion; (3) clinicians should offer bilateral tympanostomy tube insertion to children with bilateral OME for 3 months or longer (chronic OME) and documented hearing difficulties; (4) clinicians should reevaluate, at 3- to 6-month intervals, children with chronic OME who did not receive tympanostomy tubes until the effusion is no longer present, significant hearing loss is detected, or structural abnormalities of the tympanic membrane or middle ear are suspected; (5) clinicians should not perform tympanostomy tube insertion in children with recurrent acute otitis media (AOM) who do not have middle ear effusion in either ear at the time of assessment for tube candidacy; (6) clinicians should offer bilateral tympanostomy tube insertion to children with recurrent AOM who have unilateral or bilateral middle ear effusion at the time of assessment for tube candidacy; (7) clinicians should determine if a child with recurrent AOM or with OME of any duration is at increased risk for speech, language, or learning problems from otitis media because of baseline sensory, physical, cognitive, or behavioral factors; (8) in the perioperative period, clinicians should educate caregivers of children with tympanostomy tubes regarding the expected duration of tube function, recommended follow-up schedule, and detection of complications; (9) clinicians should not encourage routine, prophylactic water precautions (use of earplugs, headbands; avoidance of swimming or water sports) for children with tympanostomy tubes. The development group provided the following options: (1) clinicians may perform tympanostomy tube insertion in children with unilateral or bilateral OME for 3 months or longer (chronic OME) and symptoms that are likely attributable to OME including, but not limited to, vestibular problems, poor school performance, behavioral problems, ear discomfort, or reduced quality of life and (2) clinicians may perform tympanostomy tube insertion in at-risk children with unilateral or bilateral OME that is unlikely to resolve quickly as reflected by a type B (flat) tympanogram or persistence of effusion for 3 months or longer (chronic OME).

3 Guideline Clinical practice guideline: sudden hearing loss. 2012

Stachler, Robert J / Chandrasekhar, Sujana S / Archer, Sanford M / Rosenfeld, Richard M / Schwartz, Seth R / Barrs, David M / Brown, Steven R / Fife, Terry D / Ford, Peg / Ganiats, Theodore G / Hollingsworth, Deena B / Lewandowski, Christopher A / Montano, Joseph J / Saunders, James E / Tucci, Debara L / Valente, Michael / Warren, Barbara E / Yaremchuk, Kathleen L / Robertson, Peter J / Anonymous4970719. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 48202, USA. rstachl1@hfhs.org ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #22383545.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Sudden hearing loss (SHL) is a frightening symptom that often prompts an urgent or emergent visit to a physician. This guideline provides evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of patients who present with SHL. The guideline primarily focuses on sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) in adult patients (aged 18 and older). Prompt recognition and management of SSNHL may improve hearing recovery and patient quality of life (QOL). Sudden sensorineural hearing loss affects 5 to 20 per 100,000 population, with about 4000 new cases per year in the United States. This guideline is intended for all clinicians who diagnose or manage adult patients who present with SHL. PURPOSE: The purpose of this guideline is to provide clinicians with evidence-based recommendations in evaluating patients with SHL, with particular emphasis on managing SSNHL. The panel recognized that patients enter the health care system with SHL as a nonspecific, primary complaint. Therefore, the initial recommendations of the guideline deal with efficiently distinguishing SSNHL from other causes of SHL at the time of presentation. By focusing on opportunities for quality improvement, the guideline should improve diagnostic accuracy, facilitate prompt intervention, decrease variations in management, reduce unnecessary tests and imaging procedures, and improve hearing and rehabilitative outcomes for affected patients. RESULTS: The panel made strong recommendations that clinicians should (1) distinguish sensorineural hearing loss from conductive hearing loss in a patient presenting with SHL; (2) educate patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) about the natural history of the condition, the benefits and risks of medical interventions, and the limitations of existing evidence regarding efficacy; and (3) counsel patients with incomplete recovery of hearing about the possible benefits of amplification and hearing-assistive technology and other supportive measures. The panel made recommendations that clinicians should (1) assess patients with presumptive SSNHL for bilateral SHL, recurrent episodes of SHL, or focal neurologic findings; (2) diagnose presumptive ISSNHL if audiometry confirms a 30-dB hearing loss at 3 consecutive frequencies and an underlying condition cannot be identified by history and physical examination; (3) evaluate patients with ISSNHL for retrocochlear pathology by obtaining magnetic resonance imaging, auditory brainstem response, or audiometric follow-up; (4) offer intratympanic steroid perfusion when patients have incomplete recovery from ISSNHL after failure of initial management; and (5) obtain follow-up audiometric evaluation within 6 months of diagnosis for patients with ISSNHL. The panel offered as options that clinicians may offer (1) corticosteroids as initial therapy to patients with ISSNHL and (2) hyperbaric oxygen therapy within 3 months of diagnosis of ISSNHL. The panel made a recommendation against clinicians routinely prescribing antivirals, thrombolytics, vasodilators, vasoactive substances, or antioxidants to patients with ISSNHL. The panel made strong recommendations against clinicians (1) ordering computerized tomography of the head/brain in the initial evaluation of a patient with presumptive SSNHL and (2) obtaining routine laboratory tests in patients with ISSNHL.

4 Review Otitis media. 2016

Schilder, Anne G M / Chonmaitree, Tasnee / Cripps, Allan W / Rosenfeld, Richard M / Casselbrant, Margaretha L / Haggard, Mark P / Venekamp, Roderick P. ·evidENT, Ear Institute, University College London, Royal National Throat Nose and Ear Hospital, 330 Grays Inn Road, WC1X 8DA London, UK. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA. · School of Medicine and Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Otolaryngology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA. · University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. ·Nat Rev Dis Primers · Pubmed #27604644.

ABSTRACT: Otitis media (OM) or middle ear inflammation is a spectrum of diseases, including acute otitis media (AOM), otitis media with effusion (OME; 'glue ear') and chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). OM is among the most common diseases in young children worldwide. Although OM may resolve spontaneously without complications, it can be associated with hearing loss and life-long sequelae. In developing countries, CSOM is a leading cause of hearing loss. OM can be of bacterial or viral origin; during 'colds', viruses can ascend through the Eustachian tube to the middle ear and pave the way for bacterial otopathogens that reside in the nasopharynx. Diagnosis depends on typical signs and symptoms, such as acute ear pain and bulging of the tympanic membrane (eardrum) for AOM and hearing loss for OME; diagnostic modalities include (pneumatic) otoscopy, tympanometry and audiometry. Symptomatic management of ear pain and fever is the mainstay of AOM treatment, reserving antibiotics for children with severe, persistent or recurrent infections. Management of OME largely consists of watchful waiting, with ventilation (tympanostomy) tubes primarily for children with chronic effusions and hearing loss, developmental delays or learning difficulties. The role of hearing aids to alleviate symptoms of hearing loss in the management of OME needs further study. Insertion of ventilation tubes and adenoidectomy are common operations for recurrent AOM to prevent recurrences, but their effectiveness is still debated. Despite reports of a decline in the incidence of OM over the past decade, attributed to the implementation of clinical guidelines that promote accurate diagnosis and judicious use of antibiotics and to pneumococcal conjugate vaccination, OM continues to be a leading cause for medical consultation, antibiotic prescription and surgery in high-income countries.

5 Review A Systematic Review of Eligibility and Outcomes in Tinnitus Trials: Reassessment of Tinnitus Guideline. 2016

Plein, Colleen T / Harounian, Jonathan / Floyd, Elizabeth / Irizarry, Rachel / Ferzli, George / Kidwai, Sarah / Rosenfeld, Richard M. ·Department of Otolaryngology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA colleen.plein@downstate.edu. · Department of Otolaryngology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #26459245.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To analyze existing tinnitus treatment trials with regard to eligibility criteria, outcome measures, study quality, and external validity and to recognize the effect of patient demographics, symptom duration, severity, and otologic comorbidity on research findings to help practitioners apply them to patient encounters. DATA SOURCES: Systematic literature search conducted by an information specialist for development of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation's tinnitus clinical practice guideline. REVIEW METHODS: Articles were assessed for eligibility with the PRISMA protocol (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) and data extracted by 2 independent investigators. Studies were assessed for methodological quality, inclusion and exclusion criteria, patient demographics, and outcome measures. RESULTS: A total of 147 randomized trials met inclusion criteria. Nearly all studies took place in a specialist setting. More than 50% did not explicitly define tinnitus, and 44% used a subjective severity threshold, such as "severely disturbing." Fifty-four percent required symptom duration of at least 6 months for study eligibility, and up to 33% excluded patients with "organic" hearing loss or otologic conditions. Mean age was 52.2 years, and median follow-up was 3 months. Only 20% had a low risk of bias. CONCLUSION: Randomized trials of tinnitus interventions are most applicable to older adults with tinnitus lasting ≥ 6 months who are evaluated in specialty settings. High risk of bias, short follow-up, and outcome reporting raise concerns about the validity of findings and may influence how clinicians apply trial results to individual patients and establish treatment expectations, thus demonstrating the need for further quality research in this field.

6 Review Cochrane corner: interventions to improve hearing aid use in adult auditory rehabilitation. 2014

Burton, Martin J / Adams, Meredith E / Rosenfeld, Richard M. ·Radcliffe Infirmary, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Minnesota Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA richrosenfeld@msn.com. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #25281750.

ABSTRACT: The "Cochrane Corner" is a section in the journal that highlights systematic reviews relevant to otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, with invited commentary to aid clinical decision making. This installment features the Cochrane review "Interventions to Improve Hearing Aid Use in Adult Auditory Rehabilitation," which identified 32 randomized controlled trials and concluded that there is low-quality evidence to support using self-management support and complex interventions (support plus delivery system design) in adult auditory rehabilitation.

7 Review Cochrane Corner: Amplification with Hearing Aids for Patients with Tinnitus and Co-existing Hearing Loss. 2014

Schilder, Anne G M / Burton, Martin J / Eby, Thomas L / Rosenfeld, Richard M. ·Department of Otolaryngology, University College of London, UK, and University Medical Center of Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Oxford and The Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK. · Department of Otolaryngology and Communicative Sciences, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA richrosenfeld@msn.com. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #24748588.

ABSTRACT: The "Cochrane Corner" is a section in the journal that highlights systematic reviews relevant to otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, with invited commentary to aid clinical decision making. This installment features a Cochrane review, "Amplification with Hearing Aids for Patients with Tinnitus and Co-existing Hearing Loss," which identified only 1 randomized controlled trial and concluded that current evidence for use of hearing aids is limited.

8 Article Clinical practice guideline: tinnitus. 2014

Tunkel, David E / Bauer, Carol A / Sun, Gordon H / Rosenfeld, Richard M / Chandrasekhar, Sujana S / Cunningham, Eugene R / Archer, Sanford M / Blakley, Brian W / Carter, John M / Granieri, Evelyn C / Henry, James A / Hollingsworth, Deena / Khan, Fawad A / Mitchell, Scott / Monfared, Ashkan / Newman, Craig W / Omole, Folashade S / Phillips, C Douglas / Robinson, Shannon K / Taw, Malcolm B / Tyler, Richard S / Waguespack, Richard / Whamond, Elizabeth J. ·Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA dtunkel@jhmi.edu. · Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois, USA. · Partnership for Health Analytic Research, LLC, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York at Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA. · New York Otology, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Research and Quality Improvement, American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, Alexandria, Virginia, USA. · Divisions of Rhinology & Sinus Surgery and Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · Department of Otolaryngology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. · Division of Geriatric Medicine and Aging, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA. · National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA. · ENT Specialists of Northern Virginia, Falls Church, Virginia, USA. · Ochsner Health System, Kenner, Louisiana, USA. · Mitchell & Cavallo, P.C., Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Otology and Neurotology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. · Department of Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Morehouse School of Medicine, East Point, Georgia, USA. · Department of Head and Neck Imaging, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. · Department of Medicine, UCLA Center for East-West Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. · Consumers United for Evidence-Based Healthcare, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #25273878.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Tinnitus is the perception of sound without an external source. More than 50 million people in the United States have reported experiencing tinnitus, resulting in an estimated prevalence of 10% to 15% in adults. Despite the high prevalence of tinnitus and its potential significant effect on quality of life, there are no evidence-based, multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines to assist clinicians with management. The focus of this guideline is on tinnitus that is both bothersome and persistent (lasting 6 months or longer), which often negatively affects the patient's quality of life. The target audience for the guideline is any clinician, including nonphysicians, involved in managing patients with tinnitus. The target patient population is limited to adults (18 years and older) with primary tinnitus that is persistent and bothersome. PURPOSE: The purpose of this guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinicians managing patients with tinnitus. This guideline provides clinicians with a logical framework to improve patient care and mitigate the personal and social effects of persistent, bothersome tinnitus. It will discuss the evaluation of patients with tinnitus, including selection and timing of diagnostic testing and specialty referral to identify potential underlying treatable pathology. It will then focus on the evaluation and treatment of patients with persistent primary tinnitus, with recommendations to guide the evaluation and measurement of the effect of tinnitus and to determine the most appropriate interventions to improve symptoms and quality of life for tinnitus sufferers. ACTION STATEMENTS: The development group made a strong recommendation that clinicians distinguish patients with bothersome tinnitus from patients with nonbothersome tinnitus. The development group made a strong recommendation against obtaining imaging studies of the head and neck in patients with tinnitus, specifically to evaluate tinnitus that does not localize to 1 ear, is nonpulsatile, and is not associated with focal neurologic abnormalities or an asymmetric hearing loss. The panel made the following recommendations: Clinicians should (a) perform a targeted history and physical examination at the initial evaluation of a patient with presumed primary tinnitus to identify conditions that if promptly identified and managed may relieve tinnitus; (b) obtain a prompt, comprehensive audiologic examination in patients with tinnitus that is unilateral, persistent (≥ 6 months), or associated with hearing difficulties; (c) distinguish patients with bothersome tinnitus of recent onset from those with persistent symptoms (≥ 6 months) to prioritize intervention and facilitate discussions about natural history and follow-up care; (d) educate patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus about management strategies; (e) recommend a hearing aid evaluation for patients who have persistent, bothersome tinnitus associated with documented hearing loss; and (f) recommend cognitive behavioral therapy to patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus. The panel recommended against (a) antidepressants, anticonvulsants, anxiolytics, or intratympanic medications for the routine treatment of patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus; (b) Ginkgo biloba, melatonin, zinc, or other dietary supplements for treating patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus; and (c) transcranial magnetic stimulation for the routine treatment of patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus. The development group provided the following options: Clinicians may (a) obtain an initial comprehensive audiologic examination in patients who present with tinnitus (regardless of laterality, duration, or perceived hearing status); and (b) recommend sound therapy to patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus. The development group provided no recommendation regarding the effect of acupuncture in patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus.