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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Livio Presutti
Based on 6 articles published since 2010
(Why 6 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, L. Presutti wrote the following 6 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Surgery of the lateral skull base: a 50-year endeavour. 2019

Zanoletti, E / Mazzoni, A / Martini, A / Abbritti, R V / Albertini, R / Alexandre, E / Baro, V / Bartolini, S / Bernardeschi, D / Bivona, R / Bonali, M / Borghesi, I / Borsetto, D / Bovo, R / Breun, M / Calbucci, F / Carlson, M L / Caruso, A / Cayé-Thomasen, P / Cazzador, D / Champagne, P-O / Colangeli, R / Conte, G / D'Avella, D / Danesi, G / Deantonio, L / Denaro, L / Di Berardino, F / Draghi, R / Ebner, F H / Favaretto, N / Ferri, G / Fioravanti, A / Froelich, S / Giannuzzi, A / Girasoli, L / Grossardt, B R / Guidi, M / Hagen, R / Hanakita, S / Hardy, D G / Iglesias, V C / Jefferies, S / Jia, H / Kalamarides, M / Kanaan, I N / Krengli, M / Landi, A / Lauda, L / Lepera, D / Lieber, S / Lloyd, S L K / Lovato, A / Maccarrone, F / Macfarlane, R / Magnan, J / Magnoni, L / Marchioni, D / Marinelli, J P / Marioni, G / Mastronardi, V / Matthies, C / Moffat, D A / Munari, S / Nardone, M / Pareschi, R / Pavone, C / Piccirillo, E / Piras, G / Presutti, L / Restivo, G / Reznitsky, M / Roca, E / Russo, A / Sanna, M / Sartori, L / Scheich, M / Shehata-Dieler, W / Soloperto, D / Sorrentino, F / Sterkers, O / Taibah, A / Tatagiba, M / Tealdo, G / Vlad, D / Wu, H / Zanetti, D. ·Department of Neuroscience DNS, Otolaryngology Section, Padova University, Padova, Italy. · Department of Neurosurgery, Lariboisière Hospital, University of Paris Diderot, Paris, France. · Gruppo Otologico, Piacenza-Rome, Italy. · Academic Neurosurgery, Department of Neuroscience DNS, University of Padova Medical School, Padova, Italy. · Neurosurgery, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · AP-HP, Groupe Hôspital-Universitaire Pitié-Salpêtrière, Neuro-Sensory Surgical Department and NF2 Rare Disease Centre, Paris, France. · Sorbonne Université, Paris, France. · ENT and Skull-Base Surgery Department, Department of Neurosciences, Ospedale Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy. · Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Department, University Hospital of Modena, Italy. · Neurosurgery, Maria Cecilia Hospital, Cotignola (RA), Italy. · Department of Neurosurgery, Julius Maximilians University Hospital Würzburg, Bavaria, Germany. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · The Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery and Audiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Neuroscience DNS, Section of Human Anatomy, Padova University, Padova, Italy. · Department of Neuroradiology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, Italy. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Maggiore della Carità, Novara, Italy. · Department of Translational Medicine, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy. · Unit of Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milano, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, Italy. · Department of Neurosurgery, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, Germany. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Head and Neck Surgery, "Julius-Maximilians" University Hospital of Würzburg, Bavaria, Germany. · Department of Neurosurgery, Cambridge University Hospital, Cambridge, UK. · Oncology Department, Cambridge University Hospital, Cambridge, UK. · Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Shanghai Ninh People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiatong University School of Medicine, China. · Department of Neurosciences, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Alfaisal University, College of Medicine, Riyadh, KSA. · ENT & Skull-Base Department, Ospedale Nuovo di Legnano, Legnano (MI), Italy. · Department of Neuro-Otology and Skull-Base Surgery Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK. · Department of Neuroscience DNS, Audiology Unit, Padova University, Treviso, Italy. · University Aix-Marseille, France. · Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Department, University Hospital of Verona, Italy. · Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Neuro-otology and Skull Base Surgery, Cambridge University Hospital, Cambridge, UK. · ENT Department, Treviglio (BG), Italy. ·Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital · Pubmed #31130732.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Article A mild phenotype of sensorineural hearing loss and palmoplantar keratoderma caused by a novel GJB2 dominant mutation. 2017

Stanghellini, I / Genovese, E / Palma, S / Falcinelli, C / Presutti, L / Percesepe, A. ·Medical Genetics Unit, Department of Mother & Child, University Hospital of Modena, Modena, Italy. · Audiology Service, Otolaryngology Department, University Hospital of Modena, Modena, Italy. · Community Healthcare Services, Otolaryngology Department, Modena, Italy. ·Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital · Pubmed #28872160.

ABSTRACT: Dominant GJB2 mutations are known to cause a syndromic form of sensorineural hearing loss associated with palmo-plantar skin manifestations. We present the genotype/phenotype correlations of a new GJB2 mutation identified in three generations of an Italian family (proband, mother and grandfather) whose members are affected by sensorineural hearing impairment associated with adult-onset palmoplantar keratoderma. In all affected members we identified a new heterozygous GJB2 mutation (c.66G > T, p.Lys22Asn) whose segregation, population frequency and in silico prediction analysis have suggested a pathogenic role. The p.Lys22Asn GJB2 mutation causes a dominant form of hearing loss associated with variable expression of palmoplantar keratoderma, representing a model of full penetrance, with an age-dependent effect on the phenotype.

3 Article Endoscopic approach for cochlear implantation in advanced otosclerosis: A case report. 2016

Marchioni, Daniele / Soloperto, Davide / Bianconi, Luca / Guarnaccia, Maria C / Genovese, Elisabetta / Presutti, Livio. ·Otolaryngology Department, University Hospital of Verona, Piazzale Aristide Stefani 1, 37126 Verona, Italy. · Otolaryngology Department, University Hospital of Verona, Piazzale Aristide Stefani 1, 37126 Verona, Italy. Electronic address: Bianconi.luca1@gmail.com. · Otolaryngology Department, University Hospital of Modena, Via del Pozzo 71, 41100 Modena, Italy. ·Auris Nasus Larynx · Pubmed #27106776.

ABSTRACT: HYPOTHESIS: Ossification of the cochlea was once considered to be a contraindication for cochlear implantation. Advances in cochlear implant technology and coding strategies have led to developments in different surgical procedures to manage cochlear ossification. The endoscopic technique allows a direct approach to the round window and the cochlea, especially in remodeled labyrinth, allowing a better vision of scala tympani. BACKGROUND: Tertiary referral ENT center. METHODS: Between January 2011 and February 2015 three patients with far advanced otosclerosis with partial obliteration of the cochlea were selected and underwent endoscopic-assisted cochlear implantation. RESULTS: In far advanced otosclerosis, endoscopy allowed a magnification of the anatomy of the round window, permitting the surrounding anatomical structures forming the anatomy of the niche to be identified, and avoiding a blind dissection. No postoperative complications were noted, in particular, no surgical site infection, no vertigo, and no facial nerve injuries. Implant activation was routinely performed 1 month after surgery. All monitoring till date has indicated that the external auditory ducts are well ventilated and there are no signs of extrusion. CONCLUSIONS: Ossification may occur as a consequence of the pathology of meningitis, chronic otitis media, severe otosclerosis, autoimmune inner ear diseases, temporal bone traumas, and other diseases. Advances in cochlear implant technology and coding strategies have led to developments in different surgical procedures to manage cochlear ossification. Supported by a number of years of experience in the field of otoendoscopic surgery, we propose a technique for cochlear implantation under unfavorable conditions using endoscopic-assisted surgery, especially in advanced otosclerosis. This technique permits us to extend the indication for cochlear implantation, and in our opinion will reduce the morbidity associated with this surgical procedure.

4 Article Stapes malformations: the contribute of the endoscopy for diagnosis and surgery. 2016

Marchioni, Daniele / Soloperto, Davide / Villari, Domenico / Tatti, Maria Fatima / Colleselli, Elena / Genovese, Elisabetta / Presutti, Livio. ·Otolaryngology Department, University Hospital of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Otolaryngology Department, University Hospital of Verona, Verona, Italy. davidesolop@tiscali.it. · Otolaryngology Department, University Hospital of Modena, Modena, Italy. ·Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #26253427.

ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to investigate the contribute of the endoscopic exclusive transcanalar approach for the management of stapes malformations. A retrospective chart review was made at our tertiary referral centers. 17 patients with stapes malformations underwent surgery with endoscopic exclusive transcanal approach. A complete audiological and radiological assessment before and after surgery was performed. 12/17 (70 %) underwent a surgical endoscopic correction, In case of fixed platina underwent five endoscopic stapedotomy and one endoscopic stapedectomy were performed. In case of mobile platina five endoscopic ossiculoplasties with partial ossiculoplasty replacement prosthesis were performed, 3 with autologous remodeling incus and 2 with malleus head remodeling. In 1 case, only an endoscopic stapes mobilization was made. In 5/17 (30 %), due to difficult anatomical findings an endoscopic explorative tympanotomy was finally performed. The mean preoperative air conduction (AC), bone conduction (BC) and air-bone gap (ABG) were, respectively, 60.7, 26.3 and 34.4 dB. The mean postoperative AC, BC and ABG were, respectively, 33.8, 26.5 and 7.3 dB, with a mean improvement of the ABG of 27.1 dB. Discharge from hospital was on the first post-surgery day. No relevant postoperative complications were noted. The median follow-up was 3.6 years (range 1-6). The endoscopic approach results very adequate for the diagnosis and treatment of stapes malformations, checking variations of the ossicles conformation and functioning and performing safe surgery, under direct control of middle ear structures.

5 Article Endoscopic assisted cochlear implants in ear malformations. 2015

Marchioni, Daniele / Soloperto, Davide / Guarnaccia, Maria C / Genovese, Elisabetta / Alicandri-Ciufelli, Matteo / Presutti, Livio. ·Otolaryngology Department, University Hospital of Modena, Via del Pozzo 71, 41100, Modena, Italy. ·Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #25085636.

ABSTRACT: The aim of present study is to describe the use of the endoscopic assisted cochlear implant approach in cases with severely malformed temporal bones and with anomalous anatomy of the inner ear and tympanic cavity. Eight patients with malformed middle and inner ear and bilateral profound hearing loss were operated using an endoscopic assisted cochlear implant procedure at our tertiary university referral center between January and September 2013. Five patients received a cochlear implant using a suprameatal endoscopic assisted approach. A chart review of clinical data and videos from the operations was performed. All procedures were re-analyzed and codified. In all patients, discharge from hospital was on the third day post-surgery. No immediate or late postoperative complications were noted. The current mean follow-up is 6 months, with range between 4 and 12 months. This approach proved to be successful in cochlear implant placement. It guaranteed a very good control on the facial nerve, even in cases with difficult anatomical conditions, mainly thanks to the endoscopic procedure. It also permitted an appropriate anatomical orientation of the abnormal middle ear with a direct safe cochleostomy, when the round window position would have been difficult to treat using a traditional approach.

6 Minor The transcanal transpromontorial corridor to treat cochlear schwannomas. 2015

Alicandri-Ciufelli, Matteo / Marchioni, Daniele / Presutti, Livio. ·Otolaryngology Department University Hospital of Modena Modena, Italy matteo.alicandri@hotmail.it Neurosurgery Department New Civil Hospital Sant'Agostino-Estense, Baggiovara Modena, Italy Otolaryngology Department University Hospital of Modena Modena, Italy Otolaryngology Department University Hospital of Modena Modena, Italy. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #25025537.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --