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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Vanesa Pérez Guillen
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, V. Perez-Guillen wrote the following 3 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Valencia's Cathedral Church Bell Acoustics Impact on the Hearing Abilities of Bell Ringers. 2019

García, Laura / Parra, Lorena / Gomis, Blanca Pastor / Cavallé, Laura / Pérez Guillén, Vanesa / Pérez Garrigues, Herminio / Lloret, Jaime. ·Instituto de Investigación para la Gestión Integrada de zonas Costeras, Universitat Politècnica de València, C/Paranimf 1, Grau de Gandia, 46730 Valencia, Spain. laugarg2@teleco.upv.es. · Instituto de Investigación para la Gestión Integrada de zonas Costeras, Universitat Politècnica de València, C/Paranimf 1, Grau de Gandia, 46730 Valencia, Spain. loparbo@doctor.upv.es. · Sección de Otoneurología del Hospital Universitario La Fe, 46026 Valencia, Spain. bpastorgomis@gmail.com. · Sección de Otoneurología del Hospital Universitario La Fe, 46026 Valencia, Spain. cavallelaura@gmail.com. · Sección de Otoneurología del Hospital Universitario La Fe, 46026 Valencia, Spain. perez_mva@gva.es. · Sección de Otoneurología del Hospital Universitario La Fe, 46026 Valencia, Spain. perez_her@gva.es. · Instituto de Investigación para la Gestión Integrada de zonas Costeras, Universitat Politècnica de València, C/Paranimf 1, Grau de Gandia, 46730 Valencia, Spain. jlloret@dcom.upv.es. ·Int J Environ Res Public Health · Pubmed #31060256.

ABSTRACT: Studies on the effect of occupational noise have been widely performed for occupations such as construction workers, workers of factories or even musicians and workers of nightclubs. However, studies on the acoustics of church bells are very scarce and usually reported in languages other than English. In Spain, although the tradition of bell ringers is progressively getting lost, some bell ringers that continue transmitting the tradition remain. Church bells create sound with a large sound pressure level that can be heard from a great distance. However, despite the characteristics of the sound of church bells, bell ringers do not present symptoms of occupational hearing loss unlike musicians and construction workers. To determine the effects of the sound of the church bells on bell ringers, in this paper, an acoustic study of the church bells and a physiological study of the hearing abilities of bell ringers. Results show sound pressure levels reaching 120 dB inside the bell tower. The resulting hearing loss in bell ringers is small considering the great intensity of the sound produced by the bells. This is likely due to the short amount of time that bell ringers are exposed to the sound even if it reaches high sound pressure levels.

2 Article Extended phenotype and clinical subgroups in unilateral Meniere disease: A cross-sectional study with cluster analysis. 2017

Frejo, L / Martin-Sanz, E / Teggi, R / Trinidad, G / Soto-Varela, A / Santos-Perez, S / Manrique, R / Perez, N / Aran, I / Almeida-Branco, M S / Batuecas-Caletrio, A / Fraile, J / Espinosa-Sanchez, J M / Perez-Guillen, V / Perez-Garrigues, H / Oliva-Dominguez, M / Aleman, O / Benitez, J / Perez, P / Lopez-Escamez, J A / Anonymous7350895. ·Otology & Neurotology Group CTS495, Department of Genomic Medicine- Centro de Genómica e Investigación Oncológica - Pfizer/Universidad de Granada/Junta de Andalucía (GENYO), Granada, Spain. · Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital Universitario de Getafe, Getafe, Spain. · Department of Otolaryngology, San Raffaelle Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Division of Otoneurology, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Badajoz, Badajoz, Spain. · Division of Otoneurology, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Department of Otolaryngology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · Department of Otolaryngology, Complexo Hospitalario de Pontevedra, Pontevedra, Spain. · Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital de Poniente, El Ejido, Almería, Spain. · Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital Universitario Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain. · Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital Miguel Servet, Zaragoza, Spain. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Hospital San Agustin, Linares, Jaen, Spain. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, Spain. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Hospital Costa del Sol, Marbella, Malaga, Spain. · Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, Alicante, Spain. · Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital Universitario de Gran Canaria Dr Negrin, Las Palmas, Spain. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Hospital Universitario de Cabueñes, Gijon, Spain. · Department of Otolaryngology, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Complejo Hospitalario Universidad de Granada (CHUGRA), Granada, Spain. ·Clin Otolaryngol · Pubmed #28166395.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To define clinical subgroups by cluster analysis in patients with unilateral Meniere disease (MD) and to compare them with the clinical subgroups found in bilateral MD. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study with a two-step cluster analysis. SETTINGS: A tertiary referral multicenter study. PARTICIPANTS: Nine hundred and eighty-eight adult patients with unilateral MD. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: best predictors to define clinical subgroups with potential different aetiologies. RESULTS: We established five clusters in unilateral MD. Group 1 is the most frequently found, includes 53% of patients, and it is defined as the sporadic, classic MD without migraine and without autoimmune disorder (AD). Group 2 is found in 8% of patients, and it is defined by hearing loss, which antedates the vertigo episodes by months or years (delayed MD), without migraine or AD in most of cases. Group 3 involves 13% of patients, and it is considered familial MD, while group 4, which includes 15% of patients, is linked to the presence of migraine in all cases. Group 5 is found in 11% of patients and is defined by a comorbid AD. We found significant differences in the distribution of AD in clusters 3, 4 and 5 between patients with uni- and bilateral MD. CONCLUSIONS: Cluster analysis defines clinical subgroups in MD, and it extends the phenotype beyond audiovestibular symptoms. This classification will help to improve the phenotyping in MD and facilitate the selection of patients for randomised clinical trials.

3 Article Response Over Time of Vertigo Spells to Intratympanic Dexamethasone Treatment in Meniere's Disease Patients. 2016

Atrache Al Attrache, Nabil / Krstulovic, Claudio / Pérez Guillen, Vanesa / Morera Pérez, Constantino / Pérez Garrigues, Herminio. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, Spain. nabil_atrache@hotmail.com. ·J Int Adv Otol · Pubmed #27340991.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness and response over time of intratympanic dexamethasone on the symptoms of Meniere's disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a matched cohort study of 24 patients with Meniere's disease who were unresponsive to initial treatment and underwent 3 sessions of weekly intratympanic dexamethasone injections using a concentration of 16 mg/mL and 24 matched controls with the same characteristics with regard to vertigo spells. RESULTS: Compared with control subjects, intratympanic dexamethasone injections resulted in a decrease in the frequency of vertigo spells in the first 6-month period. In the dexamethasone-treated group, a ≥60% decrease in vertigo spells was achieved by 70.8% of patients in the first 6 months. Total remission was achieved by 20.8% of patients in the first 8 months, but after this, the effect tapered. A slight improvement in Tinnitus loudness and no changes in hearing levels were found. The stage of Meniere's disease, years from disease onset, and mean number of vertigo spells per month did not have any effects on the percentage of decrease in vertigo spells. CONCLUSION: Intratympanic dexamethasone temporarily reduces the frequency of vertigo spells during the initial months but does not remove the probability of having further spells in the future. This therapy provides a valuable tool to accomplish a rapid decrease in vertigo spells in subjects with Meniere's disease, and it is considered an alternative to chemical or surgical labyrinthectomy.