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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by William J. Parkes
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, William Parkes wrote the following 3 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Preliminary experience using a cochlear implant with a novel linear pedestal design. 2017

Parkes, William J / Gnanasegaram, Joshua J / Cushing, Sharon L / James, Adrian L / Gordon, Karen A / Papsin, Blake C. ·Archie's Cochlear Implant Laboratory, Department of Otolaryngology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: wjparkes@gmail.com. · Archie's Cochlear Implant Laboratory, Department of Otolaryngology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; The Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Archie's Cochlear Implant Laboratory, Department of Otolaryngology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Archie's Cochlear Implant Laboratory, Department of Otolaryngology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; The Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #28109496.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety and efficiency of cochlear implantation using a novel device with a linear silastic pedestal (2 mm wide, 2 mm deep, 10 mm long) on the flat undersurface. METHODS: Operative times required to drill a linear groove (LG) for the new linear pedestal design were prospectively accrued for 46 implantations in 30 children (median age 3). Intra-operative safety was assessed during each case. Instances of dural exposure in the base of the LG were noted. Length of stay was also recorded as a secondary measure of efficiency. RESULTS: Across all surgeons, the mean time needed to create the LG was 1.9 ± 1.5 min (±SD) with a median time of 1.5 min (95% Cl: 1-2 min). The range in time was 1-10 min. No intraoperative complications occurred. Intended device positioning was confirmed with on-table post-operative x-rays in all cases. 43% of patients were discharged on the day of surgery. CONCLUSIONS: The novel linear pedestal design allows for deliberate device placement while adding little additional operative time and complexity, an improvement on our current standard of care.

2 Article Transmastoid access in branchio-oto-renal syndrome: A reappraisal of computed tomography imaging. 2018

Parkes, William J / Cushing, Sharon L / Blaser, Susan I / Papsin, Blake C. ·Division of Otolaryngology, Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE, USA; Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Electronic address: william.parkes@nemours.org. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Neuroradiology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #30262375.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate for temporal bone abnormalities that might affect transmastoid surgery such as cochlear implantation in cases of branchio-oto-renal syndrome (BOR). STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review. METHODS: Qualitative assessment of temporal bone computed tomography imaging was performed by a neuroradiologist for 30 individuals with BOR (60 ears) and 20 controls with normal hearing (20 ears). Transmastoid access was assessed categorically across 4 features: tip development, cortex pneumatization, tegmen height, and facial recess pneumatization. The appearance of 4 standard landmarks (Koerner's septum, antrum, prominence of the horizontal semicircular canal, incudal short process) was also dichotomized as normal or abnormal. Data were compared using Fisher's exact testing. RESULTS: Mastoid height differed between the groups with tip underdevelopment noted in 72% of BOR ears vs. 40% of controls (p = 0.02), and a low tegmen was seen in 68% of BOR ears and 25% of controls (p < 0.01). Significant differences in pneumatization were also found for the mastoid cortex (28% non-pneumatized in BOR vs. 5% in controls; p = 0.03) and the facial recess (27% non-pneumatized in BOR vs. 0% in controls; p = 0.01). Standard landmarks were easily identified in all of the control mastoids. In the BOR group, Koerner's septum was abnormally located or absent in 45%, and the antrum was severely hypoplastic or absent in 50%. Similarly, the prominence of the horizontal semicircular canal and the short process of the incus were dysplastic in 73% (44/60) and 62% (37/60), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Mastoid abnormalities are common in BOR syndrome. Restricted transmastoid access and abnormal or absent mastoid landmarks should be anticipated in those patients with BOR who become cochlear implant candidates. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4.

3 Article Natural History of Tympanic Membrane Retraction in Children with Cleft Palate. 2018

Parkes, William / Vilchez-Madrigal, Luis / Cushing, Sharon / Papsin, Blake / James, Adrian. ·Clinic of Otolaryngology, Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE, USA. · Clinic of Otolaryngology, National Children's Hospital, San Jose, Costa Rica. · Clinic of Otolaryngology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·J Int Adv Otol · Pubmed #30100539.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The natural history of tympanic membrane retraction is unpredictable. To obtain prognostic information for guiding surveillance and treatment, a cohort of children with retraction from cleft palate were prospectively followed for over 5 years. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective observational study at a tertiary academic institution. Children with pars tensa retraction were selected from a cohort of 143 children with cleft palate. Thirty-seven ears were assessed with otoendoscopic image capture and audiometry at a median age of 9 years and reassessed at a median follow-up interval of 6.4 years. The severity of tympanic membrane retraction in the serial images of each ear was compared by four pediatric otolaryngologists blinded to the dates of the images. RESULTS: Initially, 19/37 retractions (51%) demonstrated contact with the incus and/or promontory. Follow-up images were rated as stable (n=16) or better (n=12) for 28/37 retractions (76%). Of the nine retractions that became more extensive, two developed cholesteatoma (5% of the total). No ossicular erosion developed in ears without cholesteatoma. Conductive hearing loss (4-tone average air-bone gap >25 decibels hearing level) was initially present in five ears, worsened in one, and normalized without intervention in others. No ears with initial normal hearing developed hearing loss. CONCLUSION: Most tympanic membrane retractions remained stable or improved over time in this cohort of children who were at a risk of persistent eustachian tube dysfunction. Clinically significant progression occurred infrequently, justifying the conservative approach taken to manage these retractions. Such data are necessary to weigh the potential benefit of preventive intervention over observation.