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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Sheila T. F. Moodie
Based on 10 articles published since 2010
(Why 10 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Sheila Moodie wrote the following 10 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Parent-to-parent support for parents with children who are deaf or hard of hearing: a conceptual framework. 2014

Henderson, Rebecca J / Johnson, Andrew / Moodie, Sheila. · ·Am J Audiol · Pubmed #25281845.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Parent-to-parent support for parents with children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) is identified as an important component of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) programs for children with hearing loss. PURPOSE: The specific aim of this review was to identify the constructs and components of parent-to-parent support for parents of children who are D/HH. RESEARCH DESIGN: An extensive scoping literature review identified 39 peer-reviewed articles published from 2000 to 2014. Studies were selected and reviewed based on standardized procedures. RESULTS: Data were identified, extracted, and organized into libraries of thematic and descriptive content. A conceptual framework of parent-to-parent support for parents of children who are D/HH was developed and presented in a comprehensive, bidirectional informational graphic. The constructs and components of the conceptual framework are (a) well-being: parent, family, and child; (b) knowledge: advocacy, system navigation, and education; and (c) empowerment: confidence and competence. CONCLUSION: The findings from this scoping review led to the development of a structured conceptual framework of parent-to-parent support for parents of children who are D/HH. The conceptual framework provides an important opportunity to explore and clearly define the vital contribution of parents in EHDI programs.

2 Article Fit-to-Targets for the Desired Sensation Level Version 5.0a Hearing Aid Prescription Method for Children. 2017

Moodie, Sheila T F / Anonymous290914 / Scollie, Susan D / Bagatto, Marlene P / Keene, Kelley. ·National Centre for Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. · ListenUP! Canada, Peterborough, Ontario. ·Am J Audiol · Pubmed #28744549.

ABSTRACT: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure the range of fit to Desired Sensation Level version 5.0 (DSL v5.0) targets in pediatric practice environments. Results will be used in the future to develop clinical-aided speech intelligibility index typical performance data. Method: Clinical partners collected data from 161 final hearing aid settings for children aged ≤ 10 years. Measured data were obtained by performing 2-cm3 coupler-simulated real-ear measurements using the DSL v5.0 implementation on the Audioscan VF-1 (Etymonic Design Inc., Dorchester, ON, Canada) for soft, average, and loud speech inputs and maximum hearing aid output levels. Results: Fittings were within ± 5-dB root-mean-square (RMS) error of target for 77%, 80%, and 82% of fittings for the soft, medium, and loud speech test levels, respectively. Aided maximum power output measures were within ± 5-dB RMS error in 72% of cases. Degree of hearing loss, test frequency, and frequency by test level were significant factors in deviation from target. The range of aided speech intelligibility index values exhibited a strong correlation with the hearing levels of the children tested. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that typical hearing aid fittings for children can be achieved within ± 5-dB RMS error of the DSL v5.0 target. Greater target deviations were observed at extreme frequencies and as the severity of hearing loss increased.

3 Article Revised Conceptual Framework of Parent-to-Parent Support for Parents of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: A Modified Delphi Study. 2016

Henderson, Rebecca J / Johnson, Andrew M / Moodie, Sheila T. · ·Am J Audiol · Pubmed #27249168.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A scoping review of the literature was conducted, resulting in the development of a conceptual framework of parent-to-parent support for parents with children who are Deaf or hard of hearing. This is the 2nd stage of a dual-stage scoping review. PURPOSE: This study sought stakeholder opinion and feedback with an aim to achieve consensus on the constructs, components, and design of the initial conceptual framework. RESEARCH DESIGN: A modified electronic Delphi study was completed with 21 handpicked experts from 7 countries who have experience in provision, research, or experience in the area of parent-to-parent support. Participants completed an online questionnaire using an 11-point Likert scale (strongly disagree to strongly agree) and open-ended questions to answer various questions related to the descriptor terms, definitions, constructs, components, and overall design of the framework. RESULTS: Participant responses led to the revision of the original conceptual framework. CONCLUSION: The findings from this dual-stage scoping review and electronic Delphi study provide a conceptual framework that defines the vital contribution of parents in Early Hearing Detection and Intervention programs that will be a useful addition to these programs.

4 Article Using the Real-Ear-to-Coupler Difference within the American Academy of Audiology Pediatric Amplification Guideline: Protocols for Applying and Predicting Earmold RECDs. 2016

Moodie, Sheila / Pietrobon, Jonathan / Rall, Eileen / Lindley, George / Eiten, Leisha / Gordey, Dave / Davidson, Lisa / Moodie, K Shane / Bagatto, Marlene / Haluschak, Meredith Magathan / Folkeard, Paula / Scollie, Susan. ·School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Western University, London, ON, Canada. · National Centre for Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Western University, London, ON, Canada. · Etymonic Design Inc., Dorchester, ON, Canada. · Center for Childhood Communication at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA. · Salus University, Elkins Park, PA. · East Penn Hearing Center, Emmaus, PA. · Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE. · Oticon A/S, Smørum, Denmark. · Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO. · Institute for Reconstructive Sciences in Medicine (iRSM), Edmonton, AB, Canada. ·J Am Acad Audiol · Pubmed #26967366.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Real-ear-to-coupler difference (RECD) measurements are used for the purposes of estimating degree and configuration of hearing loss (in dB SPL ear canal) and predicting hearing aid output from coupler-based measures. Accurate measurements of hearing threshold, derivation of hearing aid fitting targets, and predictions of hearing aid output in the ear canal assume consistent matching of RECD coupling procedure (i.e., foam tip or earmold) with that used during assessment and in verification of the hearing aid fitting. When there is a mismatch between these coupling procedures, errors are introduced. PURPOSE: The goal of this study was to quantify the systematic difference in measured RECD values obtained when using a foam tip versus an earmold with various tube lengths. Assuming that systematic errors exist, the second goal was to investigate the use of a foam tip to earmold correction for the purposes of improving fitting accuracy when mismatched RECD coupling conditions occur (e.g., foam tip at assessment, earmold at verification). STUDY SAMPLE: Eighteen adults and 17 children (age range: 3-127 mo) participated in this study. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Data were obtained using simulated ears of various volumes and earmold tubing lengths and from patients using their own earmolds. Derived RECD values based on simulated ear measurements were compared with RECD values obtained for adult and pediatric ears for foam tip and earmold coupling. RESULTS: Results indicate that differences between foam tip and earmold RECDs are consistent across test ears for adults and children which support the development of a correction between foam tip and earmold couplings for RECDs that can be applied across individuals. CONCLUSIONS: The foam tip to earmold correction values developed in this study can be used to provide improved estimations of earmold RECDs. This may support better accuracy in acoustic transforms related to transforming thresholds and/or hearing aid coupler responses to ear canal sound pressure level for the purposes of fitting behind-the-ear hearing aids.

5 Article Prescribing and Verifying Hearing Aids Applying the American Academy of Audiology Pediatric Amplification Guideline: Protocols and Outcomes from the Ontario Infant Hearing Program. 2016

Bagatto, Marlene / Moodie, Sheila / Brown, Christine / Malandrino, April / Richert, Frances / Clench, Debbie / Scollie, Susan. ·National Centre for Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · National Centre for Audiology and School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Faculty of Health Sciences, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · H.A. Leeper Speech and Hearing Clinic, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Faculty of Health Sciences, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · Humber River Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Centenary Audiology and Hearing, Rouge Valley Health System, Scarborough, Ontario, Canada. ·J Am Acad Audiol · Pubmed #26967361.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Guidelines and protocols for pediatric hearing aid fitting are necessary to meet the goals of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) programs. The American Academy of Audiology published an update to their Pediatric Amplification Guideline in 2013. Ontario's Infant Hearing Program (IHP) offers specific protocols that aim to fulfill recommended guidelines. It has recently been updated to align with the American Academy of Audiology Guideline and other evidence. PURPOSE: A summary of the updates to the Ontario IHP's Amplification Protocol is described. In addition, data illustrating hearing-related outcomes of the program are offered. RESEARCH DESIGN: The updated Ontario protocol is based on evidence, wherever possible. Where research is not yet available, clinical decision support has been described in a systematic way. Outcomes of the Ontario IHP were obtained through a longitudinal clinical observation study. STUDY SAMPLE: One hundred and fifteen children with hearing loss, who wore hearing aids, were included in the outcome analyses (mean = 28.6 mo; range = 1.3-115.3 mo). Hearing losses ranged from mild to profound, unilateral or bilateral sensorineural (pure-tone average = 52.3 dB HL). They were recruited from four IHP clinics within Ontario. Children with complexities in addition to hearing loss were included. INTERVENTION: The children were fitted with hearing aids following Ontario's Amplification Protocol. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSES: During routine clinical appointments, IHP Audiologists administered questionnaires to the parents of their pediatric patients using a systematic outcome measurement protocol (University of Western Ontario Pediatric Audiological Monitoring Protocol). Hearing aid fitting details (e.g., speech intelligibility index) were also gathered to describe the quality of the hearing aid fittings in relation to the functional outcomes. Regression analyses were conducted to characterize scores on the questionnaires and the impact of important variables. Children with complexities were analyzed separately from those who were typically developing. RESULTS: Important updates to Ontario's Amplification Protocol offer new details about candidacy considerations as well as technical updates. Outcomes from the IHP reveal protocol elements can be executed clinically and when they are, typically developing children who wear hearing aids are meeting auditory development and performance milestones. CONCLUSIONS: Updates to Ontario's Amplification Protocol are necessary to support the evolution of EHDI programs and the evidence which sustains them. With advances in technology and additional research, pediatric hearing aid fitting will continue to progress and support systematic measurement of outcomes for children who wear hearing aids. The application of state-of-the-art hearing aid fitting practices to the pediatric population within EHDI programs supports good outcomes for infants and children with hearing loss.

6 Article Pediatric Audiology in North America: Current Clinical Practice and How It Relates to the American Academy of Audiology Pediatric Amplification Guideline. 2016

Moodie, Sheila / Rall, Eileen / Eiten, Leisha / Lindley, George / Gordey, Dave / Davidson, Lisa / Bagatto, Marlene / Scollie, Susan. ·National Centre for Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Western University, London, ON, Canada. · Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA. · Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE. · Salus University, Elkins Park, PA. · East Penn Hearing Center, Emmaus, PA. · Oticon A/S, Smørum, Denmark. · Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO. ·J Am Acad Audiol · Pubmed #26967360.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is broad consensus that screening and diagnosis of permanent hearing loss in children must be embedded within a comprehensive, evidence-based, family-centered intervention program. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for pediatric hearing assessment and hearing aid verification aim to reduce variability in practice and increase the use of effective evidence-based diagnostic and treatment options so that optimal outcomes may be achieved. To be of value, guidelines must be translated and implemented into practice and ongoing monitoring of their use in practice should occur. PURPOSE: This paper provides the results of two studies that aim to examine current pediatric audiology and amplification practice in North America. RESEARCH DESIGN: A concurrent embedded mixed methods design was used. STUDY SAMPLE: An electronic survey was distributed to North American audiologists who delivered pediatric audiology services with 350 audiologists participating in study 1 and 63 audiologists participating in study 2. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: A quantitative approach was the predominant method of data collection. Respondents were prompted to provide additional qualitative text and detail regarding their quantitative response choice. This qualitative text was used during the analysis phase and combined with quantitative results to assist understanding of respondents' knowledge, skills, and barriers/facilitators to implement best practice in pediatric amplification. RESULTS: Approximately 70% of audiologists reported using best-practice protocols for pediatric hearing aid fitting. Despite widespread knowledge and increased use of CPGs over the last 18 yrs, results of these studies show that variation in practice patterns continue to exist. Several examples of implementation challenges are discussed with recommendations provided. CONCLUSIONS: In order for audiologists working with children who are deaf or hard of hearing and their families to achieve the principles of family-centered early intervention, practice guidelines must continue to be developed, disseminated, and translated as they have a positive impact on the services provided. Researchers and clinical audiologists who deliver services must continue to collaborate to understand the "how" and "why" of implementing guidelines into practice and to identify the barriers/facilitators encountered in trying to do so.

7 Article The Ling 6(HL) test: typical pediatric performance data and clinical use evaluation. 2014

Glista, Danielle / Scollie, Susan / Moodie, Sheila / Easwar, Vijayalakshmi / Anonymous431178. ·National Centre for Audiology and School of Communications Sciences and Disorders, Western University, London, ON Canada. · National Centre for Audiology and School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Western University, London, ON Canada. ·J Am Acad Audiol · Pubmed #25514453.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The Ling 6(HL) test offers a calibrated version of naturally produced speech sounds in dB HL for evaluation of detection thresholds. Aided performance has been previously characterized in adults. PURPOSE: The purpose of this work was to evaluate and refine the Ling 6(HL) test for use in pediatric hearing aid outcome measurement. RESEARCH DESIGN: This work is presented across two studies incorporating an integrated knowledge translation approach in the characterization of normative and typical performance, and in the evaluation of clinical feasibility, utility, acceptability, and implementation. STUDY SAMPLE: A total of 57 children, 28 normally hearing and 29 with binaural sensorineural hearing loss, were included in Study 1. Children wore their own hearing aids fitted using Desired Sensation Level v5.0. Nine clinicians from The Network of Pediatric Audiologists participated in Study 2. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: A CD-based test format was used in the collection of unaided and aided detection thresholds in laboratory and clinical settings; thresholds were measured clinically as part of routine clinical care. Confidence intervals were derived to characterize normal performance and typical aided performance according to hearing loss severity. Unaided-aided performance was analyzed using a repeated-measures analysis of variance. The audiologists completed an online questionnaire evaluating the quality, feasibility/executability, utility/comparative value/relative advantage, acceptability/applicability, and interpretability, in addition to recommendation and general comments sections. RESULTS: Ling 6(HL) thresholds were reliably measured with children 3-18 yr old. Normative and typical performance ranges were translated into a scoring tool for use in pediatric outcome measurement. In general, questionnaire respondents generally agreed that the Ling 6(HL) test was a high-quality outcome evaluation tool that can be implemented successfully in clinical settings. CONCLUSIONS: By actively collaborating with pediatric audiologists and using an integrated knowledge translation framework, this work supported the creation of an evidence-based clinical tool that has the potential to be implemented in, and useful to, clinical practice. More research is needed to characterize performance in alternative listening conditions to facilitate use with infants, for example. Future efforts focused on monitoring the use of the Ling 6(HL) test in daily clinical practice may help describe whether clinical use has been maintained across time and if any additional adaptations are necessary to facilitate clinical uptake.

8 Article The University of Western Ontario Pediatric Audiological Monitoring Protocol (UWO PedAMP). 2011

Bagatto, Marlene P / Moodie, Sheila T / Malandrino, April C / Richert, Frances M / Clench, Debbie A / Scollie, Susan D. ·National Centre for Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. bagatto@nca.uwo.ca ·Trends Amplif · Pubmed #22194316.

ABSTRACT: This study proposed and evaluated a guideline for outcome evaluation for infants and children with hearing loss who wear hearing aids. The University of Western Ontario Pediatric Audiological Monitoring Protocol (UWO PedAMP) was developed following a critical review of pediatric outcome evaluation tools and was systematically examined by the Network of Pediatric Audiologists of Canada. It consists of tools to gather clinical process outcomes as well as functional caregiver reports. The UWO PedAMP was administered to a clinical population of infants and children with hearing aids. Sixty-eight children were administered the functional outcome evaluation tools (i.e., caregiver reports) a total of 133 times. Clinical process outcomes of hearing aid verification (e.g., real-ear-to-coupler difference) revealed typical aided audibility (e.g., Speech Intelligibility Index). Results for the LittlEARS(®) questionnaire revealed that typically developing children with hearing loss who wear hearing aids are meeting auditory development milestones. Children with mild to moderate comorbidities displayed typical auditory development during the 1st year of life after which development began to decline. Children with complex factors related to hearing aid use had lower scores on the LittlEARS, but auditory development was in parallel to norms. Parents' Evaluation of Aural/Oral Performance (PEACH) results indicated no age effect on scoring for children above 2 years of age; however, the effect of degree of hearing loss was significant. This work provides clinicians with a systematic, evidence-based outcome evaluation protocol to implement as part of a complete pediatric hearing aid fitting.

9 Article An integrated knowledge translation experience: use of the Network of Pediatric Audiologists of Canada to facilitate the development of the University of Western Ontario Pediatric Audiological Monitoring Protocol (UWO PedAMP v1.0). 2011

Moodie, Sheila T / Bagatto, Marlene P / Miller, Linda T / Kothari, Anita / Seewald, Richard / Scollie, Susan D. ·National Centre for Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. sheila@nca.uwo.ca ·Trends Amplif · Pubmed #22194315.

ABSTRACT: Pediatric audiologists lack evidence-based, age-appropriate outcome evaluation tools with well-developed normative data that could be used to evaluate the auditory development and performance of children aged birth to 6 years with permanent childhood hearing impairment. Bagatto and colleagues recommend a battery of outcome tools that may be used with this population. This article provides results of an evaluation of the individual components of the University of Western Ontario Pediatric Audiological Monitoring Protocol (UWO PedAMP) version 1.0 by the audiologists associated with the Network of Pediatric Audiologists of Canada. It also provides information regarding barriers and facilitators to implementing outcome measures in clinical practice. Results indicate that when compared to the Parents' Evaluation of Aural/Oral Performance of Children (PEACH) Diary, audiologists found the PEACH Rating Scale to be a more clinically feasible evaluation tool to implement in practice from a time, task, and consistency of use perspective. Results also indicate that the LittlEARS(®) Auditory Questionnaire could be used to evaluate the auditory development and performance of children aged birth to 6 years with permanent childhood hearing impairment (PCHI). The most cited barrier to implementation is time. The result of this social collaboration was the creation of a knowledge product, the UWO PedAMP v1.0, which has the potential to be useful to audiologists and the children and families they serve.

10 Article Fit to targets, preferred listening levels, and self-reported outcomes for the DSL v5.0 a hearing aid prescription for adults. 2010

Polonenko, Melissa J / Scollie, Susan D / Moodie, Sheila / Seewald, Richard C / Laurnagaray, Diana / Shantz, Juliane / Richards, Andrea. ·National Centre for Audiology, University of Western Ontario, Canada. ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #20438300.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated how closely the DSL v5.0 a prescription could be approximated with hearing aids, its relationship to preferred listening levels (PLLs) of adults with acquired hearing loss, and the self-reported outcomes of the resulting fittings. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty adults with varying degrees and configurations of hearing loss ranging from mild to severe. METHODS: Hearing aid output was measured after the initial fitting to DSL v5.0 a targets and after determination of the PLL after approximately 90 days. The Client Oriented Scale of Improvement (COSI) was used to evaluate outcome. RESULTS: The 95% confidence interval of fits to target ranged from 5.8 to 8.4 dB across frequency. The DSL v5.0 a adult algorithm approximated the PLLs of the participants within 2.6 dB on average. Hearing aid fittings provided positive subjective outcome improvements on the COSI. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that the use of DSL v5.0 a for the fitting of hearing aids on adults with acquired hearing loss was feasible and provided an appropriate initial fitting.