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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Ashkan Monfared
Based on 7 articles published since 2009
(Why 7 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Ashkan Monfared wrote the following 7 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Clinical practice guideline: tinnitus executive summary. 2014

Tunkel, David E / Bauer, Carol A / Sun, Gordon H / Rosenfeld, Richard M / Chandrasekhar, Sujana S / Cunningham, Eugene R / Archer, Sanford M / Blakley, Brian W / Carter, John M / Granieri, Evelyn C / Henry, James A / Hollingsworth, Deena / Khan, Fawad A / Mitchell, Scott / Monfared, Ashkan / Newman, Craig W / Omole, Folashade S / Phillips, C Douglas / Robinson, Shannon K / Taw, Malcolm B / Tyler, Richard S / Waguespack, Richard / Whamond, Elizabeth J. ·Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA dtunkel@jhmi.edu. · Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois, USA. · Partnership for Health Analytic Research, LLC, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA. · New York Otology, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Research and Quality Improvement, American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, Alexandria, Virginia, USA. · Divisions of Rhinology & Sinus Surgery and Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. · Department of Otolaryngology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. · Division of Geriatric Medicine and Aging, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA. · National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA. · ENT Specialists of Northern Virginia, Falls Church, Virginia, USA. · Ochsner Health System, Kenner, Louisiana, USA. · Mitchell & Cavallo, P.C., Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Otology and Neurotology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. · Department of Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Morehouse School of Medicine, East Point, Georgia, USA. · Department of Head and Neck Imaging, Weill Cornell Medical Center, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. · Department of Medicine, UCLA Center for East-West Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. · Consumers United for Evidence-based Healthcare, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #25274374.

ABSTRACT: The American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Tinnitus. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 13 recommendations developed address the evaluation of patients with tinnitus, including selection and timing of diagnostic testing and specialty referral to identify potential underlying treatable pathology. It will then focus on the evaluation and treatment of patients with persistent primary tinnitus, with recommendations to guide the evaluation and measurement of the impact of tinnitus and to determine the most appropriate interventions to improve symptoms and quality of life for tinnitus sufferers.

2 Article Cochlear Implantation in a Patient With Sickle Cell Disease With Early Cochlear Sclerosis. 2018

Kim, Seon Jeong / Taheri, Muhammad Reza / Merkison, Marquitta / Monfared, Ashkan. ·George Washington University School of Medicine. · Department of Radiology. · Division of Audiology. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #29210948.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: We report a case of bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and early cochlear sclerosis in a patient with sickle cell disease. METHODS: A 19-year-old female presented with sequential bilateral sudden SNHL and early cochlear sclerosis. Cochlear implantation was performed. RESULTS: Early cochlear fibrosis in the hook region and basal turn was encountered within a few months of deafness. Implantation required serial dilation using various insertion guides. Postsurgical telemetry readings revealed 19 electrodes (7 paired basal electrodes, 5 single apical electrodes) in a good working order with low impedances in bilateral ears. Activation of the processors successfully provided access to the speech frequency range in both the ears. CONCLUSION: This is the first case of intraoperative documentation of rapid cochlear sclerosis in a patient with SNHL caused by sickle cell disease. Early cochlear implantation should be considered in these patients, and otolaryngologists should be aware of the possibility of rapid cochlear sclerosis without ossification in these patients.

3 Article Brainstem herniation into the internal acoustic canal secondary to hydrocephalus in context of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea: report of a novel entity. 2018

Gragnaniello, Cristian / Myseros, John S / Taheri, Reza / Monfared, Ashkan. ·Department of Neurosurgery, George Washington University, 2150 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC, 20037, USA. cristiang@gwu.edu. · Division of Neurosurgery, Children's National Health System, Washington, DC, 20010, USA. · Department of Radiology, George Washington University, 2150 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC, 20037, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, George Washington University, 2150 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC, 20037, USA. ·Childs Nerv Syst · Pubmed #28905145.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION AND CLINICAL PRESENTATION: The authors report a case of a 5-year-old boy presenting with vision loss, right-sided hearing loss, and facial paralysis secondary to hydrocephalus causing brainstem herniation into the internal auditory canal (IAC) following cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otorrhea. MANAGEMENT AND OUTCOME: After placement of a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt (VP shunt), the vision and facial palsy improved whilst hearing loss persisted. Imaging demonstrated partial reduction of the herniated brainstem and resolution of hydrocephalus. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported of brainstem herniation into the internal auditory canal.

4 Article An Expansile Petrous Apex Mass. 2016

Espinel, Alexandra G / Taheri, M Reza / Monfared, Ashkan. ·Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC. · Department of Radiology, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC. · Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC. ·JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #27195444.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Article Clinical practice guideline: tinnitus. 2014

Tunkel, David E / Bauer, Carol A / Sun, Gordon H / Rosenfeld, Richard M / Chandrasekhar, Sujana S / Cunningham, Eugene R / Archer, Sanford M / Blakley, Brian W / Carter, John M / Granieri, Evelyn C / Henry, James A / Hollingsworth, Deena / Khan, Fawad A / Mitchell, Scott / Monfared, Ashkan / Newman, Craig W / Omole, Folashade S / Phillips, C Douglas / Robinson, Shannon K / Taw, Malcolm B / Tyler, Richard S / Waguespack, Richard / Whamond, Elizabeth J. ·Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA dtunkel@jhmi.edu. · Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois, USA. · Partnership for Health Analytic Research, LLC, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York at Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA. · New York Otology, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Research and Quality Improvement, American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, Alexandria, Virginia, USA. · Divisions of Rhinology & Sinus Surgery and Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · Department of Otolaryngology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. · Division of Geriatric Medicine and Aging, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA. · National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA. · ENT Specialists of Northern Virginia, Falls Church, Virginia, USA. · Ochsner Health System, Kenner, Louisiana, USA. · Mitchell & Cavallo, P.C., Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Otology and Neurotology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. · Department of Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Morehouse School of Medicine, East Point, Georgia, USA. · Department of Head and Neck Imaging, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. · Department of Medicine, UCLA Center for East-West Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. · Consumers United for Evidence-Based Healthcare, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #25273878.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Tinnitus is the perception of sound without an external source. More than 50 million people in the United States have reported experiencing tinnitus, resulting in an estimated prevalence of 10% to 15% in adults. Despite the high prevalence of tinnitus and its potential significant effect on quality of life, there are no evidence-based, multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines to assist clinicians with management. The focus of this guideline is on tinnitus that is both bothersome and persistent (lasting 6 months or longer), which often negatively affects the patient's quality of life. The target audience for the guideline is any clinician, including nonphysicians, involved in managing patients with tinnitus. The target patient population is limited to adults (18 years and older) with primary tinnitus that is persistent and bothersome. PURPOSE: The purpose of this guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinicians managing patients with tinnitus. This guideline provides clinicians with a logical framework to improve patient care and mitigate the personal and social effects of persistent, bothersome tinnitus. It will discuss the evaluation of patients with tinnitus, including selection and timing of diagnostic testing and specialty referral to identify potential underlying treatable pathology. It will then focus on the evaluation and treatment of patients with persistent primary tinnitus, with recommendations to guide the evaluation and measurement of the effect of tinnitus and to determine the most appropriate interventions to improve symptoms and quality of life for tinnitus sufferers. ACTION STATEMENTS: The development group made a strong recommendation that clinicians distinguish patients with bothersome tinnitus from patients with nonbothersome tinnitus. The development group made a strong recommendation against obtaining imaging studies of the head and neck in patients with tinnitus, specifically to evaluate tinnitus that does not localize to 1 ear, is nonpulsatile, and is not associated with focal neurologic abnormalities or an asymmetric hearing loss. The panel made the following recommendations: Clinicians should (a) perform a targeted history and physical examination at the initial evaluation of a patient with presumed primary tinnitus to identify conditions that if promptly identified and managed may relieve tinnitus; (b) obtain a prompt, comprehensive audiologic examination in patients with tinnitus that is unilateral, persistent (≥ 6 months), or associated with hearing difficulties; (c) distinguish patients with bothersome tinnitus of recent onset from those with persistent symptoms (≥ 6 months) to prioritize intervention and facilitate discussions about natural history and follow-up care; (d) educate patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus about management strategies; (e) recommend a hearing aid evaluation for patients who have persistent, bothersome tinnitus associated with documented hearing loss; and (f) recommend cognitive behavioral therapy to patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus. The panel recommended against (a) antidepressants, anticonvulsants, anxiolytics, or intratympanic medications for the routine treatment of patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus; (b) Ginkgo biloba, melatonin, zinc, or other dietary supplements for treating patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus; and (c) transcranial magnetic stimulation for the routine treatment of patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus. The development group provided the following options: Clinicians may (a) obtain an initial comprehensive audiologic examination in patients who present with tinnitus (regardless of laterality, duration, or perceived hearing status); and (b) recommend sound therapy to patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus. The development group provided no recommendation regarding the effect of acupuncture in patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus.

6 Article Superior semicircular canal dehiscence diagnosed after failed stapedotomy for conductive hearing loss. 2011

Li, Peter M M C / Bergeron, Chris / Monfared, Ashkan / Agrawal, Sumit / Blevins, Nikolas H. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. peteli@mac.com ·Am J Otolaryngol · Pubmed #20888070.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Article Facial and vestibulocochlear nerve avulsion at the fundus of the internal auditory canal in a child without a temporal bone fracture. 2010

Corrales, C Eduardo / Monfared, Ashkan / Jackler, Robert K. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #20856161.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To describe a case of facial, vestibular, and cochlear nerve avulsion secondary to blunt trauma without an associated temporal bone fracture. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical capsule report. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENT: A 3.5-year-old girl presented with immediate facial nerve paralysis and complete deafness after being struck by an automobile. High-resolution computed tomography demonstrated a depressed occipital bone fracture with no visible fracture of the temporal bone. Magnetic resonance imaging sequence raised the question of VIIth nerve bundle discontinuity at the distal end of the internal auditory canal. INTERVENTION: The patient underwent a posterior fossa craniotomy via a translabyrinthine approach 9 months after the initial injury, and facial and auditory nerve avulsion at the fundus was confirmed at the time of surgery. The proximal segment of the facial nerve had formed a traumatic neuroma, which was resected, and primarily anastomosed to the rerouted distal segment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Facial nerve function. RESULTS: Patient has regained facial function to Grade III/VI House-Brackmann with no asymmetry at rest. CONCLUSION: An unusual pattern of injury is described. We suggest that in patients presenting with facial nerve paralysis secondary to blunt trauma, without an associated temporal bone fracture, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging is recommended to evaluate internal auditory canal discontinuity of the VIIth and VIIIth nerve complexes. A potential mechanism of avulsion is explained.