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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Catherine M. McMahon
Based on 46 articles published since 2010
(Why 46 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, C. McMahon wrote the following 46 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Review A practical guide to cochlear implantation in adults with long durations of monaural sound deprivation. 2016

Boisvert, Isabelle / McMahon, Catherine M / Dowell, Richard C. ·a Department of Linguistics , Macquarie University , Sydney , New South Wales , Australia . · b HEARing Cooperative Research Centre , Melbourne , Victoria , Australia . · c SCIC Cochlear Implant Program - an RIDBC service , Sydney , New South Wales , Australia . · d Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology , the University of Melbourne , Melbourne , Victoria , Australia , and. · e Audiology, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital , Melbourne , Victoria , Australia. ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #27146278.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This paper aims to summarize published findings by the authors and integrate these within current literature to support clinical guidelines when choosing an ear for cochlear implantation in adults with long-term monaural sound deprivation. STUDY SAMPLE: Four retrospective cohort studies based on data collected in five cochlear implantation centres with adults with bilateral hearing loss who used a single hearing aid for at least 15 years prior to unilateral or bilateral cochlear implantation. DESIGN: Review, integration and interpretation of retrospective cohort studies to support clinical recommendations. RESULTS: In this population, the prelingual nature of the hearing loss and the duration of bilateral significant hearing loss were the most reliable predictors of cochlear implantation outcomes. Importantly, the duration of sound deprivation in the ear to be implanted was not a significant predictor of speech recognition scores after cochlear implantation and should carry less weight in making recommendations. CONCLUSIONS: In most adults with postlingual hearing loss and long-term monaural sound deprivation, the sound-deprived sound deprivation ear should be preferred for implantation. For adults with prelingual deafness and monaural sound deprivation, the decision should weigh the risks of obtaining poorer results with the cochlear implant compared to the benefits of accessing binaural hearing.

2 Review Aging and Hearing Health: The Life-course Approach. 2016

Davis, Adrian / McMahon, Catherine M / Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen M / Russ, Shirley / Lin, Frank / Olusanya, Bolajoko O / Chadha, Shelly / Tremblay, Kelly L. ·University College London. AD Cave Solutions. · Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Centre for Healthy Start Initiative, Ikoyi, Lagos, Nigeria. · World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle. tremblay@uw.edu. ·Gerontologist · Pubmed #26994265.

ABSTRACT: Sensory abilities decline with age. More than 5% of the world's population, approximately 360 million people, have disabling hearing loss. In adults, disabling hearing loss is defined by thresholds greater than 40 dBHL in the better hearing ear.Hearing disability is an important issue in geriatric medicine because it is associated with numerous health issues, including accelerated cognitive decline, depression, increased risk of dementia, poorer balance, falls, hospitalizations, and early mortality. There are also social implications, such as reduced communication function, social isolation, loss of autonomy, impaired driving ability, and financial decline. Furthermore, the onset of hearing loss is gradual and subtle, first affecting the detection of high-pitched sounds and with difficulty understanding speech in noisy but not in quiet environments. Consequently, delays in recognizing and seeking help for hearing difficulties are common. Age-related hearing loss has no known cure, and technologies (hearing aids, cochlear implants, and assistive devices) improve thresholds but do not restore hearing to normal. Therefore, health care for persons with hearing loss and people within their communication circles requires education and counseling (e.g., increasing knowledge, changing attitudes, and reducing stigma), behavior change (e.g., adapting communication strategies), and environmental modifications (e.g., reducing noise). In this article, we consider the causes, consequences, and magnitude of hearing loss from a life-course perspective. We examine the concept of "hearing health," how to achieve it, and implications for policy and practice.

3 Review Dual sensory impairment in older age. 2011

Schneider, Julie M / Gopinath, Bamini / McMahon, Catherine M / Leeder, Stephen R / Mitchell, Paul / Wang, Jie Jin. ·Menzies Centre for Health Policy, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. julie.schneider@sydney.edu.au ·J Aging Health · Pubmed #21596997.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Hearing and visual impairments are commonly viewed separately in research and service provision, but they often occur together as dual sensory impairment or DSI in older populations. This article examines the frequency and effects of DSI in older age and notes limitations in the evidence. METHODS: Search of electronic databases of published papers. RESULTS: DSI diminishes communication and well-being and can cause social isolation, depression, reduced independence, mortality, and cognitive impairment. DISCUSSION: Although intuitively DSI may be expected to have additional impacts over single sensory impairment, research findings are inconclusive. Services and supports required by people with DSI are simply a combination of those required by people with single vision and hearing loss, taking account of the unique communication difficulties posed by DSI.

4 Clinical Trial Low body mass index and jaw movement are protective of hearing in users of personal listening devices. 2013

Li, Lieber Po-Hung / Chuang, Ann Yi Chiun / McMahon, Catherine / Tung, Tao-Hsin / Chen, Joshua Kuang-Chao. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. ·Laryngoscope · Pubmed #23553325.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Sound pressure level delivered through personal listening devices (PLDs) and reaching the ear drum might be affected by body size and jaw movements. This study aimed to investigate whether jaw movement and/or smaller body mass index (BMI) resulted in decrease of sound pressure level within the ear canals of PLD users via an earbud earphone. STUDY DESIGN: Case series. METHODS: Forty-five normal-hearing subjects (16 males; mean age, 23.3 years) participated in this study. A probe-microphone system was used to measure sound pressure level in the external ear canal with music delivered from a media player via an earbud earphone. Test materials consisted of two 20-second excerpts from a heavy metal music piece. Subjects were instructed to adjust the volume of the media player to conform to three conditions for sound pressure measurement: comfortable, loud, and maximum. Measurements were then repeated while subjects mimicked chewing action under the same listening conditions. RESULTS: Sound pressure levels were significantly lower when measured with jaw movement than without jaw movement (P < .05). Sound pressure levels monitored with/without jaw movement were generally lower in subjects with a BMI<23 than those with a BMI ≥ 23 (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: Jaw movement and low BMI (<23) reduced the overall sound level of PLDs at the ear canal. Sound pressure levels detected in the external ear canal of our subjects using earbud earphones were significantly lower under conditions of jaw movement/BMI <23. Our research invites further studies on a larger group of PLD users to correlate these variables with hearing threshold shifts over time.

5 Article Orthographic Learning in Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. 2019

Wass, Malin / Ching, Teresa Y C / Cupples, Linda / Wang, Hua-Chen / Lyxell, Björn / Martin, Louise / Button, Laura / Gunnourie, Miriam / Boisvert, Isabelle / McMahon, Catherine / Castles, Anne. ·Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden. · National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · The HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Cognitive Science, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden. · Centre for Implementation of Hearing Research, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. ·Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch · Pubmed #30383206.

ABSTRACT: Purpose The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationship between orthographic learning and language, reading, and cognitive skills in 9-year-old children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) and to compare their performance to age-matched typically hearing (TH) controls. Method Eighteen children diagnosed with moderate-to-profound hearing loss who use hearing aids and/or cochlear implants participated. Their performance was compared with 35 age-matched controls with typical hearing. Orthographic learning was evaluated using a spelling task and a recognition task. The children were assessed on measures of reading ability, language, working memory, and paired-associate learning. Results On average, the DHH group performed more poorly than the TH controls on the spelling measure of orthographic learning, but not on the recognition measure. For both groups of children, there were significant correlations between orthographic learning and phonological decoding and between visual-verbal paired-associate learning and orthographic learning. Conclusions Although the children who are DHH had lower scores in the spelling test of orthographic learning than their TH peers, measures of their reading ability revealed that they acquired orthographic representations successfully. The results are consistent with the self-teaching hypothesis in suggesting that phonological decoding is important for orthographic learning.

6 Article Idiopathic intracranial hypertension VISION (venous intervention versus shunting in IIH for optic nerve disc swelling) trial: patient perspective questionnaire. 2019

Chandran, Arun / Pulhorn, Heinke / McMahon, Catherine. ·a Neuroradiology , The Walton Centre , Liverpool , UK. · b Neurosurgery , The Walton Centre , Liverpool , UK. · c Neurosurgery , The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust , Liverpool , UK. ·Br J Neurosurg · Pubmed #28934871.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Headaches, visual problems and tinnitus are symptoms of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) which resolve with reduction of CSF pressure. Impaired cranial venous outflow has been implicated in the pathogenesis and there is evidence of good treatment results in IIH using venous sinus stenting. We are currently initiating a multi-centre randomised controlled trial, the VISION study (Venous Intervention versus Shunting in IIH for Optic Disc Swelling) comparing radiological (venous sinus stenting) to surgical intervention (CSF shunting). As part of the preparations for VISION we made a basic questionnaire available to members of the website IIH UK ( www.iih.org.uk ). METHODS: 10-point questionnaire pertaining to IIH diagnosis, symptoms and management using www.surveymonkey.com . RESULTS: 250 questionnaires were returned. 95.6% of respondents were female, mostly ≤40 years of age. 70% were diagnosed in the last 5 years, but only 35% were diagnosed less than a year after onset of symptoms. 59.4% of patients had not undergone any radiological/surgical intervention, 34.9% had had CSF diversion, 3.6% venous stenting and 2.0% had stent plus shunt. 16.8% indicated their lives were most affected by tinnitus and 18.1% by visual problems, but 49.6% said they were most affected by their headaches. 81% of patients indicated they would be happy to participate in a randomised trial comparing the two treatment options of venous stenting and CSF shunting. CONCLUSION: IIH patients want to be actively involved in their treatment and are favourably disposed towards clinical research. Variation exists in treatment modalities offered. There are individual differences regarding impact of symptoms.

7 Article Qualitative, multimethod study of behavioural and attitudinal responses to cochlear implantation from the patient and healthcare professional perspective in Australia and the UK: study protocol. 2018

Rapport, Frances / Bierbaum, Mia / McMahon, Catherine / Boisvert, Isabelle / Lau, Annie / Braithwaite, Jeffrey / Hughes, Sarah. ·Australian Institute of Health Innovation, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Macquarie University Centre for Implementation of Hearing Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · South Wales Cochlear Implant Programme, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, Bridgend, UK. · Swansea University Medical School, Swansea, UK. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #29844099.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The growing prevalence of adults with 'severe or greater' hearing loss globally is of great concern, with hearing loss leading to diminished communication, and impacting on an individual's quality of life (QoL). Cochlear implants (CI) are a recommended device for people with severe or greater, sensorineural hearing loss, who obtain limited benefits from conventional hearing aids (HA), and through improved speech perception, CIs can improve the QoL of recipients. Despite this, utilisation of CIs is low. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This qualitative, multiphase and multimethod dual-site study (Australia and the UK) explores patients' and healthcare professionals' behaviours and attitudes to cochlear implantation. Participants include general practitioners, audiologists and older adults with severe or greater hearing loss, who are HA users, CI users and CI candidates. Using purposive time frame sampling, participants will be recruited to take part in focus groups or individual interviews, and will each complete a demographic questionnaire and a qualitative proforma. The study aims to conduct 147 data capture events across a sample of 49 participants, or until data saturation occurs. Schema and thematic analysis with extensive group work will be used to analyse data alongside reporting of demographic and participant characteristics. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval for this study was granted by Macquarie University (HREC: 5201700539), and the study will abide by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council ethical guidelines. Study findings will be published through peer-reviewed journal articles, and disseminated through public and academic conference presentations, participant information sheets and a funders' final report.

8 Article Postgraduate training in audiology improves clinicians' audiology-related cue utilisation. 2018

Watkinson, Jarrah / Bristow, Grant / Auton, Jaime / McMahon, Catherine M / Wiggins, Mark W. ·a Centre for Elite Performance, Expertise, and Training , Macquarie University , Sydney , NSW , Australia. ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #29801417.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to test whether cue utilisation might be employed as a tool to assess the diagnostic skills of audiologists. The utilisation of cues is a characteristic of expertise and critical for successful diagnoses in clinical settings. However, neither in training nor in practice, is there a means by which the diagnostic skills of audiologists can be assessed objectively and reliably. DESIGN: The study comprised a pre-post training evaluation, controlling for prior exposure to the diagnostic testing tool. STUDY SAMPLE: Three cohorts of trainee audiologists were evaluated, one of which was tested prior to, and following a two-year training programme (16 participants), while the other two groups acted as controls (23 participants and 20 participants, respectively). RESULTS: Consistent with expectations, cue utilisation increased from the initial to the final stages of training and this effect could not be attributed to cohort nor learning effects. CONCLUSIONS: At an applied level, the outcomes provide the basis for a cue-based diagnostic assessment tool that can provide both trainee and practising audiologists with detailed feedback concerning their diagnostic skills.

9 Article A program to respond to otitis media in remote Australian Aboriginal communities: a qualitative investigation of parent perspectives. 2018

Jones, Caroline / Sharma, Mridula / Harkus, Samantha / McMahon, Catherine / Taumoepeau, Mele / Demuth, Katherine / Mattock, Karen / Rosas, Lee / Wing, Raelene / Pawar, Sulabha / Hampshire, Anne. ·MARCS Institute, ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW, 2751, Australia. caroline.jones@westernsydney.edu.au. · ARC Centre of Excellence for Cognition and its Disorders, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia. caroline.jones@westernsydney.edu.au. · Audiology Program, Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University, HEARing CRC, Sydney, Australia. · Australian Hearing, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Psychology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. · ARC Centre of Excellence for Cognition and its Disorders, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia. · MARCS Institute, ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW, 2751, Australia. · Sunrise Health Service, Katherine, Northern Territory, Australia. · The Smith Family, Sydney, Australia. ·BMC Pediatr · Pubmed #29510680.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Indigenous infants and children in Australia, especially in remote communities, experience early and chronic otitis media (OM) which is difficult to treat and has lifelong impacts in health and education. The LiTTLe Program (Learning to Talk, Talking to Learn) aimed to increase infants' access to spoken language input, teach parents to manage health and hearing problems, and support children's school readiness. This paper aimed to explore caregivers' views about this inclusive, parent-implemented early childhood program for 0-3 years in an Aboriginal community health context. METHODS: Data from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 9 caregivers of 12 children who had participated in the program from one remote Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory are presented. Data were analysed thematically. Caregivers provided overall views on the program. In addition, three key areas of focus in the program are also presented here: speech and language, hearing health, and school readiness. RESULTS: Caregivers were positive about the interactive speech and language strategies in the program, except for some strategies which some parents found alien or difficult: such as talking slowly, following along with the child's topic, using parallel talk, or baby talk. Children's hearing was considered by caregivers to be important for understanding people, enjoying music, and detecting environmental sounds including signs of danger. Caregivers provided perspectives on the utility of sign language and its benefits for communicating with infants and young children with hearing loss, and the difficulty of getting young community children to wear a conventional hearing aid. Caregivers were strongly of the opinion that the program had helped prepare children for school through familiarising their child with early literacy activities and resources, as well as school routines. But caregivers differed as to whether they thought the program should have been located at the school itself. CONCLUSIONS: The caregivers generally reported positive views about the LiTTLe Program, and also drew attention to areas for improvement. The perspectives gathered may serve to guide other cross-sector collaborations across health and education to respond to OM among children at risk for OM-related disability in speech and language development.

10 Article Social Connectedness and Perceived Listening Effort in Adult Cochlear Implant Users: A Grounded Theory to Establish Content Validity for a New Patient-Reported Outcome Measure. 2018

Hughes, Sarah E / Hutchings, Hayley A / Rapport, Frances L / McMahon, Catherine M / Boisvert, Isabelle. ·South Wales Cochlear Implant Programme, Bridgend, United Kingdom. · Swansea University Medical School, Swansea University, Swansea, United Kingdom. · The Australian Institute of Health Innovation, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Linguistics (Audiology Section), Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. ·Ear Hear · Pubmed #29424766.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Individuals with hearing loss often report a need for increased effort when listening, particularly in challenging acoustic environments. Despite audiologists' recognition of the impact of listening effort on individuals' quality of life, there are currently no standardized clinical measures of listening effort, including patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). To generate items and content for a new PROM, this qualitative study explored the perceptions, understanding, and experiences of listening effort in adults with severe-profound sensorineural hearing loss before and after cochlear implantation. DESIGN: Three focus groups (1 to 3) were conducted. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 17 participants from a cochlear implant (CI) center in the United Kingdom. The participants included adults (n = 15, mean age = 64.1 years, range 42 to 84 years) with acquired severe-profound sensorineural hearing loss who satisfied the UK's national candidacy criteria for cochlear implantation and their normal-hearing significant others (n = 2). Participants were CI candidates who used hearing aids (HAs) and were awaiting CI surgery or CI recipients who used a unilateral CI or a CI and contralateral HA (CI + HA). Data from a pilot focus group conducted with 2 CI recipients were included in the analysis. The data, verbatim transcripts of the focus group proceedings, were analyzed qualitatively using constructivist grounded theory (GT) methodology. RESULTS: A GT of listening effort in cochlear implantation was developed from participants' accounts. The participants provided rich, nuanced descriptions of the complex and multidimensional nature of their listening effort. Interpreting and integrating these descriptions through GT methodology, listening effort was described as the mental energy required to attend to and process the auditory signal, as well as the effort required to adapt to, and compensate for, a hearing loss. Analyses also suggested that listening effort for most participants was motivated by a need to maintain a sense of social connectedness (i.e., the subjective awareness of being in touch with one's social world). Before implantation, low social connectedness in the presence of high listening effort encouraged self-alienating behaviors and resulted in social isolation with adverse effects for participant's well-being and quality of life. A CI moderated but did not remove the requirement for listening effort. Listening effort, in combination with the improved auditory signal supplied by the CI, enabled most participants to listen and communicate more effectively. These participants reported a restored sense of social connectedness and an acceptance of the continued need for listening effort. CONCLUSIONS: Social connectedness, effort-reward balance, and listening effort as a multidimensional phenomenon were the core constructs identified as important to participants' experiences and understanding of listening effort. The study's findings suggest: (1) perceived listening effort is related to social and psychological factors and (2) these factors may influence how individuals with hearing loss report on the actual cognitive processing demands of listening. These findings provide evidence in support of the Framework for Understanding Effortful Listening a heuristic that describes listening effort as a function of both motivation and demands on cognitive capacity. This GT will inform item development and establish the content validity for a new PROM for measuring listening effort.

11 Article Dual-Task Walking Performance in Older Persons With Hearing Impairment: Implications for Interventions From a Preliminary Observational Study. 2018

Wollesen, Bettina / Scrivener, Katharine / Soles, Kirsty / Billy, Yaw / Leung, Angela / Martin, Felicity / Iconomou, Nicholas / McMahon, Catherine / Dean, Catherine. ·Department of Health Science, Institute of Human Movement Science, Faculty of Psychology and Human Movement Science, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. ·Ear Hear · Pubmed #28857786.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Adults with "hearing loss" have an increased falls risks. There may be an association between hearing impairment and walking performance under dual-task (DT) and triple-task (TT) conditions. The aim of this study was to identify DT and TT effects on walking speed, step length, and cadence in adults with hearing impairment, previous falls, and physical limitations. DESIGN: The observational study included 73 community-dwelling older people seeking audiology services. Data were collected on sociodemographic characteristics, previous falls, fear of falling, physical limitations, and walking performance under three task conditions. Differences between the task conditions (single task [ST], DT, and TT) and the hearing groups were analyzed with a two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. The influence of fall risks and limited physical functioning on walking under ST, DT, and TT conditions was analyzed with ANOVAs, with ST, DT, and TT performance as repeated measurement factor (i.e., walking speed, step length and Cadence × Previous falls, or short physical performance battery <12 × Hearing Groups). RESULTS: Walking speed was reduced accompanied by decreased step length and increased cadence in people with more severe hearing loss. Larger negative effects on DT and TT walking were found with increasing hearing loss (speed and cadence decreased with higher DT costs). Highest DT costs were found for the walking-manual conditions. These results were accompanied by small effects of older age and more comorbidities. CONCLUSIONS: This first screening data of walking performance under different conditions for people with hearing loss warrants the need for development and investigation of training interventions to improve walking abilities. DT training may be beneficial to enhance motor and cognitive flexibility and to reduce fall risks.

12 Article Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for assessing perceived listening effort in hearing loss: protocol for a systematic review. 2017

Hughes, Sarah E / Rapport, Frances L / Boisvert, Isabelle / McMahon, Catherine M / Hutchings, Hayley A. ·Swansea University Medical School, Swansea University, Swansea, Wales, UK. · South Wales Cochlear Implant Programme, Princess of Wales Hospital, Bridgend, UK. · Australian Institute of Health Innovation, Macquarie University, New South Wales, Australia. · The HEARing CRC, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Linguistics (Audiology Section), Macquarie University, New South Wales, Australia. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #28592576.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: In the UK, it is estimated that a disabling hearing loss (HL) affects 1 in 6 people. HL has functional, economic and social-emotional consequences for affected individuals. Intervention for HL focuses on improving access to the auditory signal using hearing aids or cochlear implants. However, even if sounds are audible and speech is understood, individuals with HL often report increased effort when listening.Listening effort (LE) may be measured using self-reported measures such as patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). PROMs are validated questionnaires completed by patients to measure their perceptions of their own functional status and well-being. When selecting a PROM for use in research or clinical practice, it is necessary to appraise the evidence of a PROM's acceptability to patients, validity, responsiveness and reliability. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A systematic review of studies evaluating the measurement properties of PROMs available to measure LE in HL will be undertaken. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO and Web of Science will be searched electronically. Reference lists of included studies, key journals and the grey literature will be hand-searched to identify further studies for inclusion. Two reviewers will independently complete title, abstract and full-text screening to determine study eligibility. Data on the characteristics of each study and each PROM will be extracted. Methodological quality of the included studies will be appraised using the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments, the quality of included PROMs appraised and the credibility of the evidence assessed. A narrative synthesis will summarise extracted data. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical permission is not required, as this study uses data from published research. Dissemination will be through publication in peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations and the lead author's doctoral dissertation. Findings may inform the selection of PROMs used to measure LE in HL.

13 Article Visual and hearing impairment and retirement in older adults: A population-based cohort study. 2017

Gopinath, Bamini / Liew, Gerald / Burlutsky, George / McMahon, Catherine M / Mitchell, Paul. ·Centre for Vision Research, Westmead Institute for Medical Research, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: bamini.gopinath@sydney.edu.au. · Centre for Vision Research, Westmead Institute for Medical Research, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. · HEARing Co-operative Research Centre, NSW, Australia; Centre for Language Sciences, Linguistics Department, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. ·Maturitas · Pubmed #28539180.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Impaired vision and hearing are common among older adults and have been shown to reduce functional independence and to reduce quality of life. This cohort study investigated the cross-sectional and temporal associations between objectively measured dual sensory impairment (DSI) and retirement from employment. STUDY DESIGN: 2409 Blue Mountains Eye Study participants aged 55+ years at baseline were included for analyses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Visual impairment was defined as visual acuity less than 20/40 (better eye), and hearing impairment as average pure-tone air conduction threshold >25dB HL (500-4000Hz, better ear). Employment status was questioned at each examination over 10 years. RESULTS: At baseline, 650 (27.0%) were employed and 1759 (73.0%) were retired. Cross-sectional analysis showed that participants with moderate to severe hearing loss, compared with those with normal hearing, had greater odds of being retired (multivariable-adjusted OR 1.96; 95% CI 1.05-3.66). Participants presenting with concurrent visual impairment and moderate to severe hearing loss versus participants with no sensory loss had a significantly lower mean retirement age, 57.1 versus 58.7 years (multivariable-adjusted p-value=0.04). Participants with any hearing loss at baseline had significantly higher odds of being retired by the 10-year follow-up (age-sex adjusted OR 1.82; 95% CI 1.00-3.30); this became marginally non-significant after adjusting for all other covariates (multivariable-adjusted OR 1.74; 95% CI 0.95-3.17). No associations were observed between DSI and the incidence of retirement. CONCLUSIONS: Sensory impairment in older adults was independently associated with the decision to retire.

14 Article Screening, Education, and Rehabilitation Services for Hearing Loss Provided to Clients with Low Vision: Measured and Perceived Value Among Participants of the Vision-Hearing Project. 2017

McMahon, Catherine M / Schneider, Julie / Dunsmore, Moira / Gopinath, Bamini / Kifley, Annette / Mitchell, Paul / Wang, Jie-Jin / Leeder, Stephen R. ·1Australian Hearing Hub, Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; 2Menzies Centre for Health Policy, 3Work Integrated Learning, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; 4Centre for Vision Research, Westmead Millennium Institute, University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; and 5Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Ear Hear · Pubmed #27556525.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Combined vision and hearing impairment, termed dual sensory impairment (DSI), is associated with poorer health outcomes compared with a single sensory loss alone. Separate systems of care exist for visual and hearing impairment which potentially limit the effectiveness of managing DSI. To address this, a Hearing Screening Education Model (HSEM) was offered to older adults attending a low-vision clinic in Australia within this pilot study. The present study aimed to evaluate the benefits of seeking help on hearing handicap, self-perceived health, and use of community services among those identified with unmet hearing needs after participation in the HSEM. DESIGN: Of 210 older adults (>55 years of age) who completed the HSEM and were referred for follow-up, 169 returned for a follow-up interview at least 12 months later. Of these, 68 (40.2%) sought help, and the majority were seen by a hearing healthcare provider (89.7%). Changes in hearing handicap, quality of life, and reliance on community services between the baseline and 12-month follow-up were compared between those who sought help and those who did not. In addition, the perceived value of the HSEM was assessed. RESULTS: Results showed that there was no significant difference in hearing handicap between those who sought help (mean change -1.02 SD = 7.97, p = 0.3) and those who did not (mean change 0.94 SD = 7.68, p = 0.3), p = 0.18. The mental component of the SF-36 worsened significantly between baseline and follow-up measures across the whole group (mean change -2.49 SD = 9.98, p = 0.002). This was largely driven by those not seeking help, rather than those seeking help, but was not significantly different between the two groups. Those who sought help showed a significant reduction in the use of community services compared with those who did not. Further, all participants positively viewed the HSEM's underlying principle of greater integration between vision and hearing services. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest a need to further develop and evaluate integrated models of healthcare for older adults with DSI. It also highlights the importance of using broader measures of benefit, other than use of hearing aids to evaluate outcomes of hearing healthcare programs.

15 Article Speech recognition outcomes following bilateral cochlear implantation in adults aged over 50 years old. 2016

Boisvert, Isabelle / McMahon, Catherine M / Dowell, Richard C. ·a Department of Linguistics , Macquarie University , Sydney , New South Wales , Australia . · b HEARing Cooperative Research Centre , Melbourne , Victoria , Australia . · c SCIC Cochlear Implant Program - an RIDBC Service , Sydney , New South Wales , Australia . · d Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology , the University of Melbourne , Melbourne , Victoria , Australia . · e Audiology , Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital , Melbourne , Victoria , Australia. ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #27049835.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To examine the speech recognition benefit of bilateral cochlear implantation over unilateral implantation in adults aged over 50 years old, and to identify potential predictors of successful bilateral implantation in this group. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study using data collected during standard clinical practice. Bilateral performance was compared to the unilateral performance with the first and second implanted ear and examined in relation to potential predictive variables. STUDY SAMPLE: Sixty-seven cochlear implant users who received a second implant after the age of 50 years old. RESULTS: Participants obtained significantly greater speech recognition scores with the use of bilateral cochlear implants compared to the use of each individual implant. The score obtained with the first implanted ear was the most reliable predictor of the score obtained with the second and with bilateral implants. CONCLUSIONS: Older adults can obtain speech recognition benefits from sequential bilateral cochlear implantation.

16 Article Hearing and vision impairment and the 5-year incidence of falls in older adults. 2016

Gopinath, Bamini / McMahon, Catherine M / Burlutsky, George / Mitchell, Paul. ·Centre for Vision Research, Department of Ophthalmology and The Westmead Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Centre for Language Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Age Ageing · Pubmed #26946051.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: concurrent vision and hearing loss are common in older adults; however, epidemiological data on their relationship with the incidence of falls are lacking. OBJECTIVE: we assessed the association between dual sensory impairment (DSI) and incidence of falls. We examined the influence of self-perceived hearing handicap and hearing aid use and risk of falls. DESIGN: a population-based, cohort study of participants followed over 5 years. SETTING: Blue Mountains, west of Sydney, Australia. SUBJECTS: one thousand four hundred and seventy-eight participants aged 55 and older at baseline were included in longitudinal analyses. METHODS: visual impairment was defined as presenting or best-corrected visual acuity less than 20/40 (better eye), and hearing impairment as average pure-tone air conduction threshold >25 dB HL (500-4,000 Hz, better ear). The shortened version of the hearing handicap inventory for the elderly was administered. Incident falls were assessed over the 12 months before each visit. Cognitive impairment was determined using the Mini-Mental State Examination. RESULTS: five-year incidence of falls was 10.4%. Participants with severe self-perceived hearing handicap versus no hearing handicap had increased risk of incident falls, multivariable-adjusted OR 1.93 (95% confidence intervals, CI, 1.02-3.64). Hearing aid users versus non-users had 75% increased likelihood of incident falls. Participants with co-existing best-corrected visual impairment and mild hearing loss (>25 to ≤40 dB HL) had higher odds of incident falls, OR 2.19 (95% CI 1.03-4.67). After excluding persons with cognitive impairment, this association did not persist. CONCLUSION: these epidemiological data show that DSI in older adults could significantly increase their risk of falling.

17 Article Cortical Reorganisation during a 30-Week Tinnitus Treatment Program. 2016

McMahon, Catherine M / Ibrahim, Ronny K / Mathur, Ankit. ·Department of Linguistics, Faculty of Human Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Carlton, Victoria, Australia. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #26901425.

ABSTRACT: Subjective tinnitus is characterised by the conscious perception of a phantom sound. Previous studies have shown that individuals with chronic tinnitus have disrupted sound-evoked cortical tonotopic maps, time-shifted evoked auditory responses, and altered oscillatory cortical activity. The main objectives of this study were to: (i) compare sound-evoked brain responses and cortical tonotopic maps in individuals with bilateral tinnitus and those without tinnitus; and (ii) investigate whether changes in these sound-evoked responses occur with amelioration of the tinnitus percept during a 30-week tinnitus treatment program. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of 12 bilateral tinnitus participants and 10 control normal-hearing subjects reporting no tinnitus were recorded at baseline, using 500 Hz, 1000 Hz, 2000 Hz, and 4000 Hz tones presented monaurally at 70 dBSPL through insert tube phones. For the tinnitus participants, MEG recordings were obtained at 5-, 10-, 20- and 30- week time points during tinnitus treatment. Results for the 500 Hz and 1000 Hz sources (where hearing thresholds were within normal limits for all participants) showed that the tinnitus participants had a significantly larger and more anteriorly located source strengths when compared to the non-tinnitus participants. During the 30-week tinnitus treatment, the participants' 500 Hz and 1000 Hz source strengths remained higher than the non-tinnitus participants; however, the source locations shifted towards the direction recorded from the non-tinnitus control group. Further, in the left hemisphere, there was a time-shifted association between the trajectory of change of the individual's objective (source strength and anterior-posterior source location) and subjective measures (using tinnitus reaction questionnaire, TRQ). The differences in source strength between the two groups suggest that individuals with tinnitus have enhanced central gain which is not significantly influenced by the tinnitus treatment, and may result from the hearing loss per se. On the other hand, the shifts in the tonotopic map towards the non-tinnitus participants' source location suggests that the tinnitus treatment might reduce the disruptions in the map, presumably produced by the tinnitus percept directly or indirectly. Further, the similarity in the trajectory of change across the objective and subjective parameters after time-shifting the perceptual changes by 5 weeks suggests that during or following treatment, perceptual changes in the tinnitus percept may precede neurophysiological changes. Subgroup analyses conducted by magnitude of hearing loss suggest that there were no differences in the 500 Hz and 1000 Hz source strength amplitudes for the mild-moderate compared with the mild-severe hearing loss subgroup, although the mean source strength was consistently higher for the mild-severe subgroup. Further, the mild-severe subgroup had 500 Hz and 1000 Hz source locations located more anteriorly (i.e., more disrupted compared to the control group) compared to the mild-moderate group, although this was trending towards significance only for the 500Hz left hemisphere source. While the small numbers of participants within the subgroup analyses reduce the statistical power, this study suggests that those with greater magnitudes of hearing loss show greater cortical disruptions with tinnitus and that tinnitus treatment appears to reduce the tonotopic map disruptions but not the source strength (or central gain).

18 Article Melodic Contour Training and Its Effect on Speech in Noise, Consonant Discrimination, and Prosody Perception for Cochlear Implant Recipients. 2015

Lo, Chi Yhun / McMahon, Catherine M / Looi, Valerie / Thompson, William F. ·Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia ; HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, VIC 3053, Australia. · Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia ; HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, VIC 3053, Australia ; ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and Its Disorders, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia. · SCIC Cochlear Implant Program-An RIDBC Service, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia. · ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and Its Disorders, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia ; Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia. ·Behav Neurol · Pubmed #26494944.

ABSTRACT: Cochlear implant (CI) recipients generally have good perception of speech in quiet environments but difficulty perceiving speech in noisy conditions, reduced sensitivity to speech prosody, and difficulty appreciating music. Auditory training has been proposed as a method of improving speech perception for CI recipients, and recent efforts have focussed on the potential benefits of music-based training. This study evaluated two melodic contour training programs and their relative efficacy as measured on a number of speech perception tasks. These melodic contours were simple 5-note sequences formed into 9 contour patterns, such as "rising" or "rising-falling." One training program controlled difficulty by manipulating interval sizes, the other by note durations. Sixteen adult CI recipients (aged 26-86 years) and twelve normal hearing (NH) adult listeners (aged 21-42 years) were tested on a speech perception battery at baseline and then after 6 weeks of melodic contour training. Results indicated that there were some benefits for speech perception tasks for CI recipients after melodic contour training. Specifically, consonant perception in quiet and question/statement prosody was improved. In comparison, NH listeners performed at ceiling for these tasks. There was no significant difference between the posttraining results for either training program, suggesting that both conferred benefits for training CI recipients to better perceive speech.

19 Article Long-term asymmetric hearing affects cochlear implantation outcomes differently in adults with pre- and postlingual hearing loss. 2015

Boisvert, Isabelle / McMahon, Catherine M / Dowell, Richard C / Lyxell, Björn. ·Department Linguistics, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; SCIC Cochlear Implant Program - An RIDBC service, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Linnaeus Centre HEAD, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden. · Department Linguistics, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Audiology, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Linnaeus Centre HEAD, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #26043227.

ABSTRACT: In many countries, a single cochlear implant is offered as a treatment for a bilateral hearing loss. In cases where there is asymmetry in the amount of sound deprivation between the ears, there is a dilemma in choosing which ear should be implanted. In many clinics, the choice of ear has been guided by an assumption that the reorganisation of the auditory pathways caused by longer duration of deafness in one ear is associated with poorer implantation outcomes for that ear. This assumption, however, is mainly derived from studies of early childhood deafness. This study compared outcomes following implantation of the better or poorer ear in cases of long-term hearing asymmetries. Audiological records of 146 adults with bilateral hearing loss using a single hearing aid were reviewed. The unaided ear had 15 to 72 years of unaided severe to profound hearing loss before unilateral cochlear implantation. 98 received the implant in their long-term sound-deprived ear. A multiple regression analysis was conducted to assess the relative contribution of potential predictors to speech recognition performance after implantation. Duration of bilateral significant hearing loss and the presence of a prelingual hearing loss explained the majority of variance in speech recognition performance following cochlear implantation. For participants with postlingual hearing loss, similar outcomes were obtained by implanting either ear. With prelingual hearing loss, poorer outcomes were obtained when implanting the long-term sound-deprived ear, but the duration of the sound deprivation in the implanted ear did not reliably predict outcomes. Contrary to an apparent clinical consensus, duration of sound deprivation in one ear has limited value in predicting speech recognition outcomes of cochlear implantation in that ear. Outcomes of cochlear implantation are more closely related to the period of time for which the brain is deprived of auditory stimulation from both ears.

20 Article Improving access to hearing services for people with low vision: piloting a "hearing screening and education model" of intervention. 2014

Schneider, Julie / Dunsmore, Moira / McMahon, Catherine M / Gopinath, Bamini / Kifley, Annette / Mitchell, Paul / Leeder, Stephen R / Wang, Jie Jin. ·1Menzies Centre for Health Policy, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; 2Centre for Language Sciences, Linguistics Department, Macquarie University, New South Wales, Australia. 3HEARing Co-operative Research Centre, Victoria, Australia; and 4Centre for Vision Research, Westmead Millennium Institute, University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. ·Ear Hear · Pubmed #24852681.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to investigate the potential unmet need for hearing services among older people attending low-vision rehabilitation, and pilot a "Hearing Screening and Education Model" (HSEM) of intervention to promote use of hearing services and aids among these individuals. DESIGN: In the Vision-Hearing project, 300 clients attending low-vision clinics in Sydney, Australia, participated in baseline interviews and the HSEM (2010-2011). The HSEM consisted of: (1) standard pure-tone audiometry; (2) discussion of hearing loss and implications of dual sensory impairment; and (3) provision of information on hearing services and facilitated referral. Those with hearing loss who did not own hearing aids, reported low use (<1 hr/day), or used a single aid with bilateral loss were referred for full assessment by an audiologist and to the follow-up arm of the study (n = 210). Follow-up interviews were conducted within 12 months to ascertain actions taken and audiological and other health outcomes. RESULTS: Of 169 participants in the follow-up study, 68 (40.2%) sought help for hearing loss within 12 months. Help-seekers had higher mean hearing handicap scores at baseline compared with non-help-seekers. The majority of help-seekers (85.3%) underwent a complete hearing assessment. Fifty-four percent (n = 37) were recommended hearing aids and the majority of these (n = 27) obtained new hearing aids. Seven participants had existing aids adjusted, and 3 obtained alternate assistive listening devices. Almost half of those receiving new aids or adjustments to hearing aids reported low use (<1 hr/day) at follow-up. Among help-seekers, 40% were unsure or did not believe their audiologist knew of their visual diagnosis. Of concern, 60% of participants did not seek help largely due to perceptions their hearing loss was not bad enough; the presence of competing priorities; concerns over dealing with vision loss and managing hearing aids with poor vision. CONCLUSIONS: Hearing- and vision-rehabilitation services need to better screen for, and take account of, dual sensory impairment among their older clients. If audiologists are made more aware of visual conditions affecting their clients, they may be better placed to facilitate access to appropriate technologies and rehabilitation, which may improve aid retention and benefit.

21 Article Contribution of nonimplanted ear to pitch perception for prelingually deafened cochlear implant recipients. 2014

Chen, Joshua Kuang-Chao / Chuang, Ann Yi-Chiun / McMahon, Catherine / Tung, Tao-Hsin / Li, Lieber Po-Hung. ·*Department of Otolaryngology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital; †Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University; ‡Mackay Memorial Hospital; §Centre for Language Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia; and ∥Department of Medical Research and Education, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #24797567.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Bimodal stimulation (BMS) has been shown to be beneficial for the performance of pitch ranking in postlingually deafened adults. However, the contribution of nonimplanted ears to pitch perception with respect to duration of hearing aid (HAs) use for prelingually cochlear implantees remained unclear. This study aimed to investigate whether experiences/duration of HAs use in the nonimplanted ear improved pitch perception ability in this population of subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-nine children with congenital/prelingual deafness of profound degree were studied. Test stimuli consisted of 2 sequential piano tones, ranging from C (256 Hz) to B (495 Hz). Children were asked to identify the pitch relationship between the 2 tones (i.e., same, higher, or lower). RESULTS: Duration of HAs use was the major factor related to the correct rate for pitch perception. Overall correct rate for pitch perception (O) could be best predicted by duration of HAs use (DuA) (O = 0.561XDuA, r = 0. 315, p = 0.002). DISCUSSION: Experiences of HAs use appear to improve pitch perception ability in prelingually cochlear implantees. This suggests that incorporation of HAs use early in life and through the postoperative rehabilitation program for prelingually deafened children with cochlear implants would be beneficial, although an association does not guarantee causality. A longitudinal study is needed to show whether improvement of music performance with duration of HAs use in these children is measurable using auditory evoked potentials.

22 Article Association between diet quality with concurrent vision and hearing impairment in older adults. 2014

Gopinath, B / Schneider, J / Flood, V M / McMahon, C M / Burlutsky, G / Leeder, S R / Mitchell, P. ·Dr Bamini Gopinath, Centre for Vision Research, University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital, Hawkesbury Rd, Westmead, NSW, 2145, Australia. Telephone: 61 2 9845 5551 Fax: 61 2 9845 8345 Email: bamini.gopinath@sydney.edu.au. ·J Nutr Health Aging · Pubmed #24626751.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Published literature shows that individual nutrients could influence the risk of developing vision and hearing loss. There is, however, a lack of population-based data on the relationship between overall patterns of food intake and the presence of concurrent vision and hearing impairment. We aimed to assess the associations between diet quality with the prevalence and 5-year incidence of dual sensory impairment (DSI). DESIGN: Cross-sectional and 5-year longitudinal analyses. SETTING: Blue Mountains, Sydney, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: 2443 participants aged ≥50 from baseline were examined and followed over 5 years. MEASUREMENTS: Dietary data were collected using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. A modified version of the Healthy Eating Index for Australians was developed to determine total diet score (TDS). Visual impairment was defined as visual acuity less than 20/40 (better eye), and hearing impairment as average pure-tone air conduction threshold greater than 25 dB HL (500-4000 Hz, better ear). RESULTS: After adjusting for age, sex, education, noise exposure, current smoking, and type 2 diabetes, participants in the lowest compared to the highest quintile of TDS had a 2-fold increased likelihood of having prevalent DSI, odds ratio, OR, 2.62 (95% confidence intervals, CI, 1.08-6.36), P-trend=0.04. Significant associations were not observed between TDS and the prevalence of having a single sensory impairment (vision or hearing loss). Baseline TDS was not significantly associated with the 5-year incidence of DSI. Adherence to dietary guidelines was associated with a reduced likelihood of having DSI in cross-sectional, but not in longitudinal analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Further studies with adequate power are warranted to assess the prospective relationship between diet quality and DSI.

23 Article Dual sensory impairment and hearing aid use among clients attending low-vision services in Australia: the vision-hearing project. 2014

Schneider, Julie M / McMahon, Catherine M / Gopinath, Bamini / Kifley, Annette / Barton, Rebecca / Mitchell, Paul / Leeder, Stephen R / Wang, Jie Jin. ·University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·J Aging Health · Pubmed #24344196.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To report the frequency of hearing impairment among vision rehabilitation clients, and to identify patterns of hearing service and aid use. METHOD: In the Vision-Hearing Project, 300 participants (65+ years) completed interviews and a hearing test at low-vision clinics. Visual impairment was defined as visual acuity <20/40 (better eye) wearing glasses if owned, and hearing impairment as average pure-tone air conduction threshold >25 dB hearing level (HL) over four frequencies (500, 1000, 2000, 4000 Hz, better ear). Dual sensory impairment (DSI) was defined as presence of both impairments. RESULTS: Bilateral hearing impairment was identified in 79.7% of participants and DSI in 62.1%. Only 59.8% of hearing impaired participants owned hearing aids and 33.8% reported low use (<1 hr/day). DISCUSSION: Four in five low-vision clients experience hearing impairment, and many have unmet needs. New models of sensory assessment that take account of hearing and vision are needed to support early detection and timely rehabilitation for DSI.

24 Article Successful outcomes of cochlear implantation in long-term unilateral deafness: brain plasticity? 2013

Távora-Vieira, Dayse / Boisvert, Isabelle / McMahon, Catherine M / Maric, Vesna / Rajan, Gunesh P. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, West Perth, WA 6005, Australia. dayse.tavora@gmail.com ·Neuroreport · Pubmed #23880870.

ABSTRACT: To investigate the implications of duration of deafness in the rehabilitation of unilateral deafness utilizing cochlear implantation. From the ongoing prospective cochlear implantation in unilateral deafness study, we looked at five adults who received a cochlear implant for long-term unilateral deafness. Speech perception in noise and subjective evaluation of the benefits of cochlear implantation were measured at 3, 6, and 12 months after implantation. The results were analyzed and compared with published data from normal hearing individuals and adults using cochlear implants bilaterally. Analysis of speech perception in noise showed significant improvement for three spatial configurations: speech and noise from the front (S0/N0; P=0.003), speech from the front and noise from the normal hearing ear (S0/NHE; P=0.001), speech from the implanted ear, and noise from the normal hearing ear (SCI/NHE; P<0.001). The scores obtained at 12 months after surgery improved to values similar to those obtained by individuals with normal hearing. The results of subjective measures showed significant improvement in hearing over time to the scores obtained by individuals with a bilateral cochlear implants and those with normal hearing. In this study, older adults with more than 25 years of unilateral deafness obtained scores in speech perception testing and in subjective evaluation that are similar to those attained by individuals with normal hearing and/or those with bilateral cochlear implants. Therefore, patients with postlingual unilateral deafness should not be excluded as cochlear implant candidates on the basis of a long duration of deafness.

25 Article Dual sensory impairment in older adults increases the risk of mortality: a population-based study. 2013

Gopinath, Bamini / Schneider, Julie / McMahon, Catherine M / Burlutsky, George / Leeder, Stephen R / Mitchell, Paul. ·Centre for Vision Research, Department of Ophthalmology and Westmead Millennium Institute, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #23469161.

ABSTRACT: Although concurrent vision and hearing loss are common in older adults, population-based data on their relationship with mortality is limited. This cohort study investigated the association between objectively measured dual sensory impairment (DSI) with mortality risk over 10 years. 2812 Blue Mountains Eye Study participants aged 55 years and older at baseline were included for analyses. Visual impairment was defined as visual acuity less than 20/40 (better eye), and hearing impairment as average pure-tone air conduction threshold greater than 25 dB HL (500-4000 Hz, better ear). Ten-year all-cause mortality was confirmed using the Australian National Death Index. After ten years, 64% and 11% of participants with DSI and no sensory loss, respectively, had died. After multivariable adjustment, participants with DSI (presenting visual impairment and hearing impairment) compared to those with no sensory impairment at baseline, had 62% increased risk of all-cause mortality, hazard ratio, HR, 1.62 (95% confidence intervals, CI, 1.16-2.26). This association was more marked in those with both moderate-severe hearing loss (>40 dB HL) and presenting visual impairment, HR 1.84 (95% CI 1.19-2.86). Participants with either presenting visual impairment only or hearing impairment only, did not have an increased risk of mortality, HR 1.05 (95% CI 0.61-1.80) and HR 1.24 (95% CI 0.99-1.54), respectively. Concurrent best-corrected visual impairment and moderate-severe hearing loss was more strongly associated with mortality 10 years later, HR 2.19 (95% CI 1.20-4.03). Objectively measured DSI was an independent predictor of total mortality in older adults. DSI was associated with a risk of death greater than that of either vision loss only or hearing loss alone.

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