Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Antonio Mazzoni
Based on 6 articles published since 2010
(Why 6 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, A. Mazzoni wrote the following 6 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Hearing preservation in small acoustic neuroma: observation or active therapy? Literature review and institutional experience. 2019

Zanoletti, Elisabetta / Mazzoni, Antonio / d'Avella, Domenico. ·Otolaryngology, University Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Academic Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosciences, University Hospital of Padova, Via Giustiniani 2, 35128, Padova, Italy. domenico.davella@unipd.it. ·Acta Neurochir (Wien) · Pubmed #30535851.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Current imaging modalities enable early diagnosis of a large number of small acoustic neuromas in patients with well-preserved hearing, whose best management is still a debatable matter. METHODS: Comparing the hearing outcome of the various therapeutical approaches, including observation, radiosurgery, or resective surgery, is not easy because of the numerous classifications measuring hearing in different ways. In this review, a literature review was performed and papers selected dealing with small tumors, short- and long-term hearing, tumor control or radical resection, and effect of pre-treatment hearing and size on outcome. Two different surgical institutional series of sporadic vestibular schwannomas provided us comparative data on the outcome of observation alone. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Our experience suggests that active treatment with hearing preservation surgery, unlike observation alone, offers a better chance of hearing preservation, also enabling a more effective treatment of the tumor and an appropriate rehabilitation with hearing aids or cochlear implants.

2 Article Surgery of the lateral skull base: a 50-year endeavour. 2019

Zanoletti, E / Mazzoni, A / Martini, A / Abbritti, R V / Albertini, R / Alexandre, E / Baro, V / Bartolini, S / Bernardeschi, D / Bivona, R / Bonali, M / Borghesi, I / Borsetto, D / Bovo, R / Breun, M / Calbucci, F / Carlson, M L / Caruso, A / Cayé-Thomasen, P / Cazzador, D / Champagne, P-O / Colangeli, R / Conte, G / D'Avella, D / Danesi, G / Deantonio, L / Denaro, L / Di Berardino, F / Draghi, R / Ebner, F H / Favaretto, N / Ferri, G / Fioravanti, A / Froelich, S / Giannuzzi, A / Girasoli, L / Grossardt, B R / Guidi, M / Hagen, R / Hanakita, S / Hardy, D G / Iglesias, V C / Jefferies, S / Jia, H / Kalamarides, M / Kanaan, I N / Krengli, M / Landi, A / Lauda, L / Lepera, D / Lieber, S / Lloyd, S L K / Lovato, A / Maccarrone, F / Macfarlane, R / Magnan, J / Magnoni, L / Marchioni, D / Marinelli, J P / Marioni, G / Mastronardi, V / Matthies, C / Moffat, D A / Munari, S / Nardone, M / Pareschi, R / Pavone, C / Piccirillo, E / Piras, G / Presutti, L / Restivo, G / Reznitsky, M / Roca, E / Russo, A / Sanna, M / Sartori, L / Scheich, M / Shehata-Dieler, W / Soloperto, D / Sorrentino, F / Sterkers, O / Taibah, A / Tatagiba, M / Tealdo, G / Vlad, D / Wu, H / Zanetti, D. ·Department of Neuroscience DNS, Otolaryngology Section, Padova University, Padova, Italy. · Department of Neurosurgery, Lariboisière Hospital, University of Paris Diderot, Paris, France. · Gruppo Otologico, Piacenza-Rome, Italy. · Academic Neurosurgery, Department of Neuroscience DNS, University of Padova Medical School, Padova, Italy. · Neurosurgery, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · AP-HP, Groupe Hôspital-Universitaire Pitié-Salpêtrière, Neuro-Sensory Surgical Department and NF2 Rare Disease Centre, Paris, France. · Sorbonne Université, Paris, France. · ENT and Skull-Base Surgery Department, Department of Neurosciences, Ospedale Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy. · Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Department, University Hospital of Modena, Italy. · Neurosurgery, Maria Cecilia Hospital, Cotignola (RA), Italy. · Department of Neurosurgery, Julius Maximilians University Hospital Würzburg, Bavaria, Germany. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · The Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery and Audiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Neuroscience DNS, Section of Human Anatomy, Padova University, Padova, Italy. · Department of Neuroradiology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, Italy. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Maggiore della Carità, Novara, Italy. · Department of Translational Medicine, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy. · Unit of Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milano, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, Italy. · Department of Neurosurgery, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, Germany. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Head and Neck Surgery, "Julius-Maximilians" University Hospital of Würzburg, Bavaria, Germany. · Department of Neurosurgery, Cambridge University Hospital, Cambridge, UK. · Oncology Department, Cambridge University Hospital, Cambridge, UK. · Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Shanghai Ninh People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiatong University School of Medicine, China. · Department of Neurosciences, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Alfaisal University, College of Medicine, Riyadh, KSA. · ENT & Skull-Base Department, Ospedale Nuovo di Legnano, Legnano (MI), Italy. · Department of Neuro-Otology and Skull-Base Surgery Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK. · Department of Neuroscience DNS, Audiology Unit, Padova University, Treviso, Italy. · University Aix-Marseille, France. · Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Department, University Hospital of Verona, Italy. · Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Neuro-otology and Skull Base Surgery, Cambridge University Hospital, Cambridge, UK. · ENT Department, Treviglio (BG), Italy. ·Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital · Pubmed #31130732.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Article Retrolabyrinthine Meatotomy as Part of Retrosigmoid Approach to Expose the Whole Internal Auditory Canal: Rationale, Technique, and Outcome in Hearing Preservation Surgery for Vestibular Schwannoma. 2018

Mazzoni, Antonio / Zanoletti, Elisabetta / Denaro, Luca / Martini, Alessandro / Avella, Domenico d'. ·Otolaryngology Department, Neurosciences Department, University Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Neurosurgery Department, Neurosciences Department, University Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. ·Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown) · Pubmed #29253291.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Vestibular schwannoma extending to the fundus of the internal auditory canal is currently considered an unfavorable condition for hearing preservation surgery via a retrosigmoid approach because the lateral end of the canal is hard to view directly during microsurgery. OBJECTIVE: To present an improved retrolabyrinthine meatotomy (RLM) technique that enables the full length of the cochlear and facial nerves to be inspected up to their orifices on the fundus. Long-term results are briefly reported. METHODS: A consecutive series of 100 cases with various degrees of fundus involvement underwent surgery via a retrosigmoid approach and RLM. The follow-up ranged from 4 to 14 yr. Outcomes on hearing and facial nerve function were recorded, and preoperative MRI findings of the tumor on the fundus were correlated with the surgical findings and the long-term radicality of the tumor resection. RESULTS: Residual tumor on the fundus was identified in 3 cases, all belonging to the group with tumors adhering to the fundus. The functional results were in line with the best reported outcomes of this surgery. CONCLUSION: RLM via a retrosigmoid approach seemed adequate for the purposes of hearing preservation surgery and enabled the full course of the facial and cochlear nerves through the internal auditory canal to be exposed to direct view. Tumors adhering to the vestibular quadrant of the fundus were more difficult to remove, and there were a few cases of local residual tumor.

4 Article Sporadic endolymphatic sac tumor: its clinical, radiological, and histological features, management, and follow-up. 2013

Poletti, Arturo M / Dubey, Siba P / Barbò, Regina / Pericotti, Sergio / Fiamengo, Barbara / Colombo, Giovanni / Scorsetti, Marta / Lorusso, Rosaria / Mazzoni, Antonio. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Istituto Clinico Humanitas IRCCS, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. arturo.poletti@humanitas.it ·Head Neck · Pubmed #22367728.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sporadic endolymphatic sac tumor (ELST) is rare. We described the clinical, radiological, and histological features, treatment, and follow-up of ELST. METHOD: This was a retrospective analysis of 7 cases of sporadic ELST that were managed between 1993 and 2010. RESULTS: Twenty-five to 75 years was the age range of the patients. Subjective hearing loss and tinnitus were the most common presenting features. Five patients had total deafness and 2 had severe sensorineural hearing loss. The most common radiological feature was temporal bone destruction with tumor extension to cerebellopontine angle and posterior cranial fossa. Cholesterol or hemosiderin cysts around the tumor could be a characteristic feature. Major skull base procedures were performed in all 7 cases, and complete tumor excision was achieved in 6 of them. One patient needed a second surgery after she was referred to us after an incomplete first surgery. Recurrences were detected in 2 patients during follow-up; 1 of them received irradiation without minimal change to the tumor size and the second refused any treatment for the recurrence. Both of them are alive with disease. CONCLUSION: Early detection and radical surgical excision at first attempt give best results. Radiotherapy could be considered only in unresectable recurrences.

5 Article Hearing preservation surgery in acoustic neuroma: long-term results. 2012

Mazzoni, A / Zanoletti, E / Calabrese, V. ·Neurosurgery Dept. Ospedali Riuniti, Bergamo, Italy. antonio.mazzoni@libero.it ·Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital · Pubmed #22767970.

ABSTRACT: Long-term hearing was examined in 200 patients operated on during 1976-2000 with removal of acoustic neuroma with a retrosigmoid approach and hearing preservation technique. Ninety-four cases preserved hearing, and 91 cases were followed-up for at least 6 years (range 6 to 21 years). Hearing was measured with the PTA 0.5 KHz to 4 KHz and the SDS, and followed the guidelines of the American Academy of Otolaryngology and Head Neck Surgery (AAOHNS classification). Change (or stability) of the short to long-term class was the main outcome measure. Postoperative hearing of class A and B was preserved at long-term and within class B in 87% of cases. A total of 13% presented a decrease of class to C or D. Small size and good preoperative hearing correlated with good short- and long-term hearing [corrected].

6 Article Hearing preservation surgery in acoustic neuroma. Slow progress and new strategies. 2011

Mazzoni, A / Biroli, F / Foresti, C / Signorelli, A / Sortino, C / Zanoletti, E. ·Otolaryngology Unit, Department of Neurosurgery and Neurological Sciences, Ospedali Riuniti, Bergamo, Italy. antonio.mazzoni@libero.it ·Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital · Pubmed #22064847.

ABSTRACT: Quality and rate of preserved hearing are crucial to make hearing preservation surgery a viable treatment. A long-term experience with hearing preservation surgery, with tumour size and hearing as admission criteria, was evaluated to assess which size and hearing allowed a high rate of success. The hearing outcome in relation to size of tumour and pre-operative hearing was retrospectively reviewed in a consecutive series of 115 cases of sporadic acoustic neuroma which were operated on with hearing preservation surgery. Inclusion criteria were hearing with ≤ 30 dB pure tone average and ≥ 70% Speech Discrimination Score. The size was ≤ 15 mm in the first series of 51 cases, and ≤ 10 mm in the second series of 64 cases. Pre-operative and post-operative pure tone average were measured at 0.5 to 4.0 KHz, and speech discrimination score at ≤ 40 dB above perception. Post-operative hearing within 30 dB pure tone average and 70% speech discrimination score was considered socially useful hearing and successful outcome. The change to 40 dB pure tone average and 60% speech discrimination score from a pre-operative 30 pure tone average/70% speech discrimination score was considered an acceptable outcome. Patients with a tumour of ≤ 10 mm size in the cerebello-pontine-angle and hearing within 20 dB pure tone average/80% speech discrimination score had a success rate of 76%. Patients with hearing between the 20 dB pure tone average/80% speech discrimination score and 30 dB pure tone average/ 70% speech discrimination score had a success rate of 41%, which increased to 53% if the limit to success was set at 40 dB pure tone average/60% speech discrimination score. Patients with a tumour larger than 10 mm or hearing worse than 30 dB pure tone average/70% speech discrimination score had a poor preservation rate. In conclusion, hearing preservation surgery on a ≤ 10 mm acoustic neuroma with good hearing had a high rate of success and appeared to be a realistic treatment option which could be integrated with observation and radiotherapy in updated guidelines of treatment.