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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Thomas Mawby
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, T. Mawby wrote the following 4 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Emberger syndrome: A rare association with hearing loss. 2018

Zawawi, Faisal / Sokolov, Meirav / Mawby, Thomas / Gordon, Karen A / Papsin, Blake C / Cushing, Sharon L. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON Canada; Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON Canada. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON Canada; Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON Canada; Archie's Cochlear Implant Laboratory, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON Canada. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON Canada; Archie's Cochlear Implant Laboratory, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON Canada; Department of Communication Disorders, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON Canada. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON Canada; Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON Canada; Archie's Cochlear Implant Laboratory, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON Canada. Electronic address: Sharon.cushing@sickkids.ca. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #29605372.

ABSTRACT: Emberger Syndrome (ES) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by lymphedema and myelodysplasia. It is also associated with hearing loss. The genetic mutations associated with ES are not part of the comprehensive 80 gene next generation sequencing (NGS) panel. As a result, the otolaryngologist should maintain an index of suspicion for ES in any child with SNHL who presents repeatedly with recurrent infections, lymphedema and/or cutaneous warts. This paper describes the clinical evolution and management of two children who were followed up for hearing loss and eventually were diagnosed with ES.

2 Article Middle ear gentamicin-soaked pledgets in the treatment of Ménière's disease. 2014

MacKeith, Samuel A C / Whiteside, Olivia J H / Mawby, Thomas / Bottrill, Ian D. ·*Department of Otolaryngology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford; and †Department of Otolaryngology, Wexham Park Hospital, Slough, West Berkshire, U.K. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #24448291.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Assess the relative efficacy and results of the round window hyaluronic acid pledget depot method for intratympanic gentamicin delivery in Ménière's disease. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case review. SETTING: Tertiary referral hospital. PATIENTS: Prospective symptomatic and audiologic data were collected on 28 patients undergoing intratympanic gentamicin therapy for Ménière's disease refractory to medical treatment between 2003 and 2009. INTERVENTION: All patients had the round window membrane exposed via a tympanomeatal flap, and any adhesions were removed. Hyaluronic acid pledgets soaked in 40 mg/ml of gentamicin were then packed into the round window niche and posterior mesotympanum, and the tympanomeatal flap was replaced. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients audiologic and vertigo symptom outcome scores were recorded at follow-up according to the AAO-HNS 1995 guidelines for reporting results in Ménière's disease. RESULTS: Complete or substantial improvement in vertigo (class A or B) was achieved in 88.5% (23/26) of patients. Hearing loss, defined as greater than 10 dB (PTA average at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz) was noted in 12 (50%) of 24 patients including 4 patients who had developed "dead ears" (16%). The average hearing loss for all patients excluding the 4 patients with dead ears was 10.7 dB. CONCLUSION: Round window hyaluronic acid pledget technique used as a sustained delivery vehicle for intratympanic gentamicin treatment for Ménière's disease produces similar rates of vertigo control compared with other techniques but a greater risk of hearing loss. We would recommend the intratympanicinjection titration technique as first line for most patients.

3 Article A UK experience of daycase cochlear implant surgery. 2014

Mawby, T A R / Kaleva, A I / Ramsden, J D. · ·Cochlear Implants Int · Pubmed #24156503.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This study aims to assess the safety of daycase cochlear implant surgery. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted on all patients who underwent cochlear implant surgery at a teaching hospital in Oxford, UK between September 2008 and February 2012. RESULTS: One hundred and sixteen patients underwent cochlear implant surgery. This included 73 adults and 43 children. Twenty-six patients underwent the procedure as a daycase procedure. There were no readmissions. DISCUSSION: The demand 'to do more with less' has led to increasing drives for efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Therefore, the role of daycase surgery is becoming increasingly widespread. Daycase surgery has been shown to be advantageous for both patients and hospitals. CONCLUSION: Daycase cochlear implant surgery is feasible and can be safely conducted in a select group of patients.

4 Article Varix of the retromandibular vein within the parotid gland: case study. 2013

Wali, G N / Mawby, T A R / Sheerin, F / Milford, C A. ·Department of ENT, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK. ·J Laryngol Otol · Pubmed #23809610.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To report a case of varix of the retromandibular vein within the parotid gland. METHODS: Case report, and discussion of the appropriate selection and use of radiological investigation techniques. RESULTS: A 64-year-old lady who presented with unilateral tinnitus underwent a magnetic resonance imaging scan to exclude a vestibular schwannoma. The magnetic resonance scout images revealed an incidental finding of a hyperechoic mass within the parotid gland. The mass was most consistent with a pleomorphic adenoma. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology was arranged; the ultrasound identified the mass as a varix of the retromandibular vein and fine needle aspiration cytology was not performed. CONCLUSION: A varix of the retromandibular vein is a very rare cause of a parotid mass. Appropriate radiological investigations can prevent unnecessary invasive investigations or procedures.