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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Cordula Matthies
Based on 8 articles published since 2010
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, C. Matthies wrote the following 8 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Prophylactic nimodipine treatment and improvement in hearing outcome after vestibular schwannoma surgery: a combined analysis of a randomized, multicenter, Phase III trial and its pilot study. 2017

Scheller, Christian / Wienke, Andreas / Tatagiba, Marcos / Gharabaghi, Alireza / Ramina, Kristofer F / Ganslandt, Oliver / Bischoff, Barbara / Zenk, Johannes / Engelhorn, Tobias / Matthies, Cordula / Westermaier, Thomas / Antoniadis, Gregor / Pedro, Maria Teresa / Rohde, Veit / von Eckardstein, Kajetan / Kretschmer, Thomas / Kornhuber, Malte / Steighardt, Jörg / Richter, Michael / Barker, Fred G / Strauss, Christian. ·Departments of 1 Neurosurgery and. · Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Leipzig. · Institute of Medical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Informatics, and. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tübingen. · Departments of 5 Neurosurgery. · Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, and. · Neuroradiology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen. · Department of Neurosurgery, Würzburg University Hospital, Würzburg. · Department of Neurosurgery, Bezirkskrankenhaus Günzburg, University of Ulm, Günzburg. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of Göttingen; and. · Department of Neurosurgery, Evangelisches Krankenhaus, University of Oldenburg, Germany ; and. · Neurology. · Coordination Centre for Clinical Trials, University of Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale). · Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. ·J Neurosurg · Pubmed #28298021.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE In clinical routines, neuroprotective strategies in neurosurgical interventions are still missing. A pilot study (n = 30) and an analogously performed Phase III trial (n = 112) pointed to a beneficial effect of prophylactic nimodipine and hydroxyethyl starch (HES) in vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery. Considering the small sample size, the data from both studies were pooled. METHODS The patients in both investigator-initiated studies were assigned to 2 groups. The treatment group (n = 70) received parenteral nimodipine (1-2 mg/hour) and HES (hematocrit 30%-35%) from the day before surgery until the 7th postoperative day. The control group (n = 72) was not treated prophylactically. Facial and cochlear nerve functions were documented preoperatively, during the inpatient care, and 1 year after surgery. RESULTS Pooled raw data were analyzed retrospectively. Intent-to-treat analysis revealed a significantly lower risk for hearing loss (Class D) 12 months after surgery in the treatment group compared with the control group (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.22-0.97; p = 0.04). After exclusion of patients with preoperative Class D hearing, this effect was more pronounced (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.17-0.83; p = 0.016). Logistic regression analysis adjusted for tumor size showed a 4 times lower risk for hearing loss in the treatment group compared with the control group (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.09-0.63; p = 0.003). Facial nerve function was not significantly improved with treatment. Apart from dose-dependent hypotension (p < 0.001), the study medication was well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS Prophylactic nimodipine is safe and may be recommended in VS surgery to preserve hearing. Prophylactic neuroprotective treatment in surgeries in which nerves are at risk seems to be a novel and promising concept. Clinical trial registration no.: DRKS 00000328 ( https://drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/drks_web/ ).

2 Clinical Trial Stability of hearing preservation and regeneration capacity of the cochlear nerve following vestibular schwannoma surgery via a retrosigmoid approach. 2016

Scheller, Christian / Wienke, Andreas / Tatagiba, Marcos / Gharabaghi, Alireza / Ramina, Kristofer F / Ganslandt, Oliver / Bischoff, Barbara / Matthies, Cordula / Westermaier, Thomas / Antoniadis, Gregor / Pedro, Maria Teresa / Rohde, Veit / von Eckardstein, Kajetan / Kretschmer, Thomas / Zenk, Johannes / Strauss, Christian. ·Department of Neurosurgery, University of Halle-Wittenberg. · Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine (TRM), University of Leipzig. · Institute of Medical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Informatics, University of Halle-Wittenberg. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tübingen. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. · Department of Neurosurgery, Würzburg University Hospital. · Department of Neurosurgery, Bezirkskrankenhaus Günzburg, University of Ulm. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of Göttingen; and. · Department of Neurosurgery, Evangelisches Krankenhaus, University of Oldenburg, Germany. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. ·J Neurosurg · Pubmed #26824379.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE The purpose of this research was to examine the stability of long-term hearing preservation and the regeneration capacity of the cochlear nerve following vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery in a prospective study. METHODS A total of 112 patients were recruited for a randomized multicenter trial between January 2010 and April 2012 to investigate the efficacy of prophylactic nimodipine treatment versus no prophylactic nimodipine treatment in VS surgery. For the present investigation, both groups were pooled to compare hearing abilities in the early postoperative course and 1 year after the surgery. Hearing was examined using pure-tone audiometry with speech discrimination, which was performed preoperatively, in the early postoperative course, and 12 months after surgery and was subsequently classified by an independent otorhinolaryngologist using the Gardner-Robertson classification system. RESULTS Hearing abilities at 2 time points were compared by evaluation in the early postoperative course and 1 year after surgery in 102 patients. The chi-square test showed a very strong association between the 2 measurements in all 102 patients (p < 0.001) and in the subgroup of 66 patients with a preserved cochlear nerve (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS There is no significant change in cochlear nerve function between the early postoperative course and 1 year after VS surgery. The result of hearing performance, as evaluated by early postoperative audiometry after VS surgery, seems to be a reliable prognosticator for future hearing ability. Clinical trial registration nos.: 2009-012088-32 ( clinicaltrialsregister.eu ) and DRKS 00000328 ("AkNiPro," drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/drks_web/ ).

3 Article Surgery of the lateral skull base: a 50-year endeavour. 2019

Zanoletti, E / Mazzoni, A / Martini, A / Abbritti, R V / Albertini, R / Alexandre, E / Baro, V / Bartolini, S / Bernardeschi, D / Bivona, R / Bonali, M / Borghesi, I / Borsetto, D / Bovo, R / Breun, M / Calbucci, F / Carlson, M L / Caruso, A / Cayé-Thomasen, P / Cazzador, D / Champagne, P-O / Colangeli, R / Conte, G / D'Avella, D / Danesi, G / Deantonio, L / Denaro, L / Di Berardino, F / Draghi, R / Ebner, F H / Favaretto, N / Ferri, G / Fioravanti, A / Froelich, S / Giannuzzi, A / Girasoli, L / Grossardt, B R / Guidi, M / Hagen, R / Hanakita, S / Hardy, D G / Iglesias, V C / Jefferies, S / Jia, H / Kalamarides, M / Kanaan, I N / Krengli, M / Landi, A / Lauda, L / Lepera, D / Lieber, S / Lloyd, S L K / Lovato, A / Maccarrone, F / Macfarlane, R / Magnan, J / Magnoni, L / Marchioni, D / Marinelli, J P / Marioni, G / Mastronardi, V / Matthies, C / Moffat, D A / Munari, S / Nardone, M / Pareschi, R / Pavone, C / Piccirillo, E / Piras, G / Presutti, L / Restivo, G / Reznitsky, M / Roca, E / Russo, A / Sanna, M / Sartori, L / Scheich, M / Shehata-Dieler, W / Soloperto, D / Sorrentino, F / Sterkers, O / Taibah, A / Tatagiba, M / Tealdo, G / Vlad, D / Wu, H / Zanetti, D. ·Department of Neuroscience DNS, Otolaryngology Section, Padova University, Padova, Italy. · Department of Neurosurgery, Lariboisière Hospital, University of Paris Diderot, Paris, France. · Gruppo Otologico, Piacenza-Rome, Italy. · Academic Neurosurgery, Department of Neuroscience DNS, University of Padova Medical School, Padova, Italy. · Neurosurgery, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · AP-HP, Groupe Hôspital-Universitaire Pitié-Salpêtrière, Neuro-Sensory Surgical Department and NF2 Rare Disease Centre, Paris, France. · Sorbonne Université, Paris, France. · ENT and Skull-Base Surgery Department, Department of Neurosciences, Ospedale Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy. · Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Department, University Hospital of Modena, Italy. · Neurosurgery, Maria Cecilia Hospital, Cotignola (RA), Italy. · Department of Neurosurgery, Julius Maximilians University Hospital Würzburg, Bavaria, Germany. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · The Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery and Audiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Neuroscience DNS, Section of Human Anatomy, Padova University, Padova, Italy. · Department of Neuroradiology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, Italy. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Maggiore della Carità, Novara, Italy. · Department of Translational Medicine, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy. · Unit of Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milano, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, Italy. · Department of Neurosurgery, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, Germany. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Head and Neck Surgery, "Julius-Maximilians" University Hospital of Würzburg, Bavaria, Germany. · Department of Neurosurgery, Cambridge University Hospital, Cambridge, UK. · Oncology Department, Cambridge University Hospital, Cambridge, UK. · Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Shanghai Ninh People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiatong University School of Medicine, China. · Department of Neurosciences, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Alfaisal University, College of Medicine, Riyadh, KSA. · ENT & Skull-Base Department, Ospedale Nuovo di Legnano, Legnano (MI), Italy. · Department of Neuro-Otology and Skull-Base Surgery Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK. · Department of Neuroscience DNS, Audiology Unit, Padova University, Treviso, Italy. · University Aix-Marseille, France. · Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Department, University Hospital of Verona, Italy. · Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Neuro-otology and Skull Base Surgery, Cambridge University Hospital, Cambridge, UK. · ENT Department, Treviglio (BG), Italy. ·Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital · Pubmed #31130732.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Article Outcomes after cochlear implant provision in children with cochlear nerve hypoplasia or aplasia. 2018

Ehrmann-Müller, Désirée / Kühn, Heike / Matthies, Cordula / Hagen, Rudolf / Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Plastic, Esthetic and Reconstructive Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wuerzburg, Josef-Schneider-Str. 11, 97080 Wuerzburg, Germany. Electronic address: ehrmann_d@ukw.de. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Plastic, Esthetic and Reconstructive Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wuerzburg, Josef-Schneider-Str. 11, 97080 Wuerzburg, Germany. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of Wuerzburg, Josef-Schneider-Str. 11, 97080 Wuerzburg, Germany. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #30055722.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cochlear nerve aplasia or hypoplasia is found in up to a half of patients with unilateral or bilateral hearing loss. There is an ongoing discussion regarding the indication of cochlear implants for hearing rehabilitation in cases with radiologically-defined aplasia or hypoplasia of the cochlear nerve in those patients, especially in children. At present there is conflicting evidence whether the audiological outcomes of those children with a CI are comparable to those of children with a CI and a radiologically-normal cochlear nerve. The primary aim of this study was to assess the audiological abilities before and after CI provision in children with cochlear nerve hypoplasia or aplasia. Additionally, we aimed to determine if audiological outcomes differed in children with aplasia from those with hypoplasia. Such data should be helpful in determining if CI provision is appropriate for such children. METHODS: This retrospective study presents 7 children who were diagnosed with cochlear nerve aplasia or hypoplasia and received a CI. The pre- and postoperative audiological performance and the hearing and speech development of the children were examined. RESULTS: 4 children were unilateral CI users and 3 were bilateral CI users. Hearing reactions could be detected in all children. Already at first fitting, prompt responses and reactions to songs were observed. The aided thresholds in free field in children with hypoplasia were between 30 and 60 dB. Even in children with aplasia, the results in free field with CI averaged between 30 and 70 dB. Therefore the aided thresholds in children with hypoplasia and in children with aplasia of the CN are similar. It could be demonstrated that hearing reactions improve with the long term use of the implant. Improvement in general development could be observed in all children despite the very heterogeneous conditions and the accompanying handicaps. CONCLUSION: The results of this study support the hypothesis that children with radiologically-defined CN hypoplasia or aplasia and detectable responses to electrical or acoustical stimuli can improve their sound detection thresholds and their awareness of sound when provided with a CI.

5 Article When Does Hearing Loss Occur in Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery? Importance of Auditory Brainstem Response Changes in Early Postoperative Phase. 2016

Hummel, Maria / Perez, Jose / Hagen, Rudolf / Gelbrich, Götz / Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo / Matthies, Cordula. ·Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany. Electronic address: Hummel_M@ukw.de. · Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany. · Department of Otolaryngology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany. · Institute for Clinical Epidemiology and Biometry, Julius- Maximilian University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany. ·World Neurosurg · Pubmed #27495840.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Some patients suffer postoperative hearing loss even when the intraoperative auditory brainstem response (ABR) is preserved during vestibular schwannomas surgery. This study was conducted to evaluate whether there are dynamic changes of the ABR after surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a prospective study from 2010-2012, 46 patients (24 female and 22 male) with vestibular schwannomas were investigated by intraoperative and postoperative ABR monitoring. Development of ABR quality during and after surgery (Class 1 normal, Class 5 complete loss) was correlated to auditory outcome. RESULTS: At the end of surgery, 17 patients had an ABR Class 1-4 and 29 had Class 5. Four hours after surgery, 9 of 23 (39%) patients showed an ABR quality change, and 24 hours after surgery, 15 of 30 (50%) had undergone ABR quality changes. Four different types of postoperative ABR courses could be distinguished-Course 1: stable with reproducible ABR, Course 2: unstable with reproducible ABR, Course 3: unstable with ABR loss, and Course 4: stable with ABR loss. These courses correlated highly significantly with the intraoperative development (P < 0.001) and with hearing outcome (P = 0.003). CONCLUSION: The study identifies ongoing changes of ABR quality and hearing function after the end of vestibular schwannoma surgery. Therefore it seems worthwhile to continue ABR monitoring in the postoperative phase in order to identify patients who are at risk of a secondary hearing deterioration and start therapeutic interventions in a timely manner.

6 Article Management of vestibular schwannoma: A pilot case series with postoperative ABR monitoring. 2016

Hummel, Maria / Krausgrill, Christin / Perez, Jose / Hagen, Rudolf / Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo / Matthies, Cordula. ·Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Würzburg, Josef-Schneider-Straße 11, 97080 Würzburg, Germany. Electronic address: Hummel_M@ukw.de. · B.A.D. Gesundheitsvorsorge und Sicherheitstechnik GmbH, Eifelweg 8-10, 63069 Offenbach, Germany. · Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Würzburg, Josef-Schneider-Straße 11, 97080 Würzburg, Germany. · Department of Otolaryngology, University Hospital Würzburg, Josef-Schneider-Straße 11, 97080 Würzburg, Germany. ·Clin Neurol Neurosurg · Pubmed #26943723.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Auditory brainstem response (ABR) monitoring is regularly used in surgery of vestibular schwannoma to achieve hearing preservation. Despite ABR preservation at the end of surgery, there are cases with postoperative deafness. To date it is unclear whether these are false positive ABR data or cases of secondary hearing loss. In this pilot study, we focused on the early postoperative phase and possible ABR changes in this period. PATIENT AND METHOD: In a prospective study from March 2008 to April 2009, eleven patients (5 female and 6 male) with vestibular schwannoma and preoperative residual hearing were investigated by repeated postoperative ABR investigation at seven dates during the first week. ABR results, hearing function and tumor extension were categorized according to Hannover classification system. The postoperative developments of the first week after surgery are described. RESULTS: Hearing preservation was achieved in 55% (6 of 11) of the patients. In the early postoperative phase, three patients with an ABR loss at the end of surgery showed some kind of recovery. In one case, a permanent recovery could be reproduced and developed step by step during the early postoperative phase. Three patients showed a postoperative deterioration resulting in a complete ABR loss. In one of these cases, it was probably a technical problem, but in the two other cases it was a real impairment. In 8 of 11 ABR, quality changed considerably during the early postoperative phase. CONCLUSION: This pilot study identifies considerable change of ABR formation occurring in a considerable proportion of patients early after vestibular schwannoma resection. Obviously, in some patients, the endoperative state of the ABR is not the final state. Some patients show a postoperative improvement and some a deterioration towards a complete loss of all ABR components. Whether secondary hearing loss could be presented by early detection, will be a matter of further studies.

7 Article New outcomes with auditory brainstem implants in NF2 patients. 2014

Behr, Robert / Colletti, Vittorio / Matthies, Cordula / Morita, Akio / Nakatomi, Hirofumi / Dominique, Liguoro / Darrouzet, Vincent / Brill, Stefan / Shehata-Dieler, W / Lorens, Artur / Skarzynski, Henryk. ·*Klinikum Fulda gAG, Academic Hospital of the University of Marburg, Fulda, Germany; †University of Verona, Verona, Italy; ‡University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany; §NTT Medical Center Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; ∥University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; ¶University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France; and #Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Warsaw, Poland. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #25325841.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine factors related to high levels of speech recognition in patients with the auditory brainstem implant (ABI). STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case review. SETTING: International multicenter data from hospitals and tertiary referral facilities. PATIENTS: Patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) and bilateral vestibular schwannomas. INTERVENTION: ABIs were placed after the removal of vestibular schwannomas. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Demographic and surgical data were collected from 26 patients with ABIs who achieved scores of better than 30% correct identification of sentences presented in quiet listening conditions and without lipreading cues. RESULTS: Scores better than 30% speech recognition of standard sentence test materials (HINT or equivalent) in quiet listening conditions were obtained in 26 of the 84 NF2 patients (31%). ABI speech recognition was correlated with surgical position, length of deafness, the number of distinct pitch electrodes, perceptual levels, and ABI stimulation rate, but not correlated with tumor size, tumor stage, the number of electrodes used, or electrophysiological recordings. This paper presents the consensus opinion from a meeting of surgeons to compare outcomes across ABI surgical centers. CONCLUSIONS: The consensus opinion was that brainstem trauma is a primary factor in the variability of outcomes in NF2 patients. The significant co-factors in outcomes implied that ABI surgery should be accomplished with great care to minimize physical and venous trauma to the brainstem. It is clear that high levels of speech recognition, including high levels of open-set speech recognition, are possible with the ABI even in patients with NF2 and large tumors.

8 Article Auditory brainstem implants in neurofibromatosis Type 2: is open speech perception feasible? 2014

Matthies, Cordula / Brill, Stefan / Varallyay, Csanad / Solymosi, Laszlo / Gelbrich, Goetz / Roosen, Klaus / Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo / Helms, Jan / Hagen, Rudolf / Mlynski, Robert / Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa / Müller, Joachim. ·Departments of Neurosurgery. ·J Neurosurg · Pubmed #24329026.

ABSTRACT: OBJECT: Patients with bilateral auditory nerve destruction may perceive some auditory input with auditory brainstem implants (ABIs). Despite technological developments and trials in new stimulation sites, hearing is very variable and of limited quality. The goal of this study was to identify advantageous and critical factors that influence the quality of auditory function, especially speech perception. METHODS: The authors conducted a prospective study on ABI operations performed with the aid of multimodality neuromonitoring between 2005 and 2009 in 18 patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2. Outcome was evaluated by testing word recognition (monotrochee-polysyllabic word test at auditory-only mode [MTPa]) and open speech perception (Hochmair-Schulz-Moser [HSM] sentence test), both in pure auditory mode. The primary outcome was the HSM score at 24 months. The predictive meaning of general clinical data, tumor volume, number of active electrodes, duration of deafness, and early hearing data was examined. RESULTS: In 16 successful ABI activations the average score for MTPa was 89% (SD 13%), and for HSM it was 41% (SD 32%) at 24 months. There were 2 nonresponders, 1 after radiosurgery and the other in an anatomical variant. Direct facial nerve reconstruction during the same surgery was followed by successful nerve recovery in 2 patients, with a simultaneous very good HSM result. Patients' age, tumor extension, and tumor volume were not negative predictors. There was an inverse relationship between HSM scores and deafness duration; 50% or higher HSM scores were found only in patients with ipsilateral deafness duration up to 24 months. The higher the deafness sum of both sides, the less likely that any HSM score will be achieved (p = 0.034). In patients with total deafness duration of less than 240 months, higher numbers of active electrodes were significantly associated with better outcomes. The strongest cross-correlation was identified between early MTPa score at 3 months and 24-month HSM outcome. CONCLUSIONS: This study documents that open-set speech recognition in pure auditory mode is feasible in patients with ABIs. Large tumor volumes do not prevent good outcome. Positive preconditions are short ipsilateral and short bilateral deafness periods and high number of auditory electrodes. Early ability in pure auditory word recognition tests indicates long-term capability of open speech perception.