Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Frank R. Lin
Based on 92 articles published since 2010
(Why 92 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Frank Lin wrote the following 92 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4
1 Editorial Time for a Top-Down Approach to Hearing Aid Affordability and Accessibility. 2018

Lin, Frank R. ·Frank R. Lin is with the Departments of Otolaryngology, Medicine (Geriatrics), Mental Health, and Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. ·Am J Public Health · Pubmed #29320290.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial The Common Sense of Considering the Senses in Patient Communication. 2017

Lin, Frank R / Whitson, Heather E. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. · Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, Duke University, School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina. · Duke Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Durham, North Carolina. · Durham Veterans Affairs Geriatrics Research, Education and Clinical Center, Durham, North Carolina. ·J Am Geriatr Soc · Pubmed #28436020.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Hearing loss and dementia - who is listening? 2014

Lin, Frank R / Albert, Marilyn. ·a Departments of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery Johns Hopkins University Baltimore , MD , USA. ·Aging Ment Health · Pubmed #24875093.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Review Otolaryngology for the Internist: Hearing Loss. 2018

Nieman, Carrie L / Reed, Nicholas S / Lin, Frank R. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 601 North Caroline Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA; Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2024 East Monument Street, Suite 2-700, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Electronic address: cnieman1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 601 North Caroline Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA; Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2024 East Monument Street, Suite 2-700, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 601 North Caroline Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA; Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2024 East Monument Street, Suite 2-700, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 5200 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21234, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. ·Med Clin North Am · Pubmed #30342615.

ABSTRACT: Hearing loss is the third most common chronic condition but can be secondary to a range of conditions encountered in primary care. This article reviews the presentation, evaluation, differential diagnosis, and associated treatments for both acute and chronic causes of hearing loss. As the most common cause of hearing loss, this article provides an overview of age-related hearing loss, its consequences, and pragmatic treatment approaches, including over-the-counter hearing technology.

5 Review Hearing loss in older adults - From epidemiological insights to national initiatives. 2018

Goman, Adele M / Lin, Frank R. ·Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, United States; Center on Aging and Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, United States. Electronic address: agoman1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, United States; Center on Aging and Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, United States; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, United States; Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins University, United States; Department of Geriatric Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, United States. ·Hear Res · Pubmed #29653842.

ABSTRACT: The broader implications of hearing loss for the health and functioning of older adults have begun to be demonstrated in epidemiologic studies. These research findings on the association between hearing loss and poorer health outcomes have formed the foundation for national initiatives on hearing loss and public health. These national initiatives range from the Aging and Cognitive Health Evaluation in Elders (ACHIEVE) clinical trial to the recent passage of the bipartisan Over-The-Counter Hearing Aid Act. Utilizing population health research methodologies to study hearing loss can provide the foundation for initiating top-down approaches to increase the adoption and accessibility of hearing care for older Americans with hearing loss.

6 Review The Economic Impact of Adult Hearing Loss: A Systematic Review. 2017

Huddle, Matthew G / Goman, Adele M / Kernizan, Faradia C / Foley, Danielle M / Price, Carrie / Frick, Kevin D / Lin, Frank R. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Center on Aging and Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · The Boston Consulting Group, New York City, New York. · Department of Gastroenterology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Baltimore, Maryland. · Johns Hopkins Welch Medical Library, Baltimore, Maryland. · Johns Hopkins Carey School of Business, Baltimore, Maryland. ·JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #28796850.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Hearing impairment (HI) is highly prevalent in older adults and has been associated with adverse health outcomes. However, the overall economic impact of HI is not well described. Objective: The goal of this review was to summarize available data on all relevant costs associated with HI among adults. Evidence Review: A literature search of PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and Scopus was conducted in August 2015. For this systematic review, data extraction and quality assessment were performed by 2 independent reviewers. Eligibility criteria for included studies were presence of quantitative estimation of economic impact or loss of productivity of patients with HI, full-text English-language access, and publication in an academic, peer-reviewed journal or government report prior to August 2015. This review follows the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement. A meta-analysis was not performed owing to the studies' heterogeneity in outcomes measures, methodology, and study country. Findings: The initial literature search yielded 4595 total references. After 2043 duplicates were removed, 2552 publications underwent title and abstract review, yielding 59 articles for full-text review. After full-text review, 25 articles were included. Of the included articles, 8 incorporated measures of disability; 5 included direct estimates of medical expenditures; 8 included other cost estimates; and 7 were related to noise-induced or work-related HI. Estimates of the economic cost of lost productivity varied widely, from $1.8 to $194 billion in the United States. Excess medical costs resulting from HI ranged from $3.3 to $12.8 billion in the United States. Conclusions and Relevance: Hearing loss is associated with billions of dollars of excess costs in the United States, but significant variance is seen between studies. A rigorous, comprehensive estimate of the economic impact of hearing loss is needed to help guide policy decisions around the management of hearing loss in adults.

7 Review Increasing access to hearing rehabilitation for older adults. 2017

Nieman, Carrie L / Lin, Frank R. ·aDepartment of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine bJohns Hopkins Center on Aging & Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions cDepartment of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine dDepartment of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #28682821.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To provide an update on the recent research and policy developments affecting the current and future care of the 23 million older Americans with untreated hearing loss. RECENT FINDINGS: Increasing evidence supports the association of age-related hearing loss with significant negative outcomes that affect the ability of older adults to age well. Despite an evolving understanding of the role hearing loss plays in the well being and vitality of older adults, the vast majority of older adults go untreated and hearing health care disparities exist. Recent work to understand the multitude of factors involved in hearing health care decisions, coupled with innovative approaches and technology to deliver hearing care, aim to provide more older adults with equal access to the tools needed to age well. Most importantly, significant national efforts and policy proposals substantiate these efforts and will be reviewed. SUMMARY: Age-related hearing loss is a critical public health issue that affects almost all older adults. Through the application of novel approaches and perspectives, the delivery of hearing health care for older adults is evolving to provide more affordable and accessible care. Accompanying policy efforts provide the necessary support needed to increase access to care significantly.

8 Review Hearing Loss Health Care for Older Adults. 2016

Contrera, Kevin J / Wallhagen, Margaret I / Mamo, Sara K / Oh, Esther S / Lin, Frank R. ·From the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (KJC) · the Department of Physiological Nursing, University of California, San Francisco (MIW) · the John A. Hartford Center of Gerontological Nursing Excellence, San Francisco, CA (MIW) · the Center on Aging and Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (SKM) · the Department of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (ESO) · and the Departments of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Geriatric Medicine, Mental Health, and Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (FRL). ·J Am Board Fam Med · Pubmed #27170797.

ABSTRACT: Hearing deficits are highly prevalent among older adults and are associated with declines in cognitive, physical, and mental health. However, hearing loss in the geriatric population often goes untreated and generally receives little clinical emphasis in primary care practice. This article reviews hearing health care for older adults, focusing on what is most relevant for family physicians. The objective of hearing loss treatment is to ensure that a patient can communicate effectively in all settings. We present the 5 major obstacles to obtaining effective hearing and rehabilitative care: awareness, access, treatment options, cost, and device effectiveness. Hearing technologies are discussed, along with recommendations on when it is appropriate to screen, refer, or counsel a patient. The purpose of this article is to provide pragmatic recommendations for the clinical management of the older adult with hearing loss that can be conducted in family medicine practices.

9 Review Aging and Hearing Health: The Life-course Approach. 2016

Davis, Adrian / McMahon, Catherine M / Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen M / Russ, Shirley / Lin, Frank / Olusanya, Bolajoko O / Chadha, Shelly / Tremblay, Kelly L. ·University College London. AD Cave Solutions. · Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Centre for Healthy Start Initiative, Ikoyi, Lagos, Nigeria. · World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle. tremblay@uw.edu. ·Gerontologist · Pubmed #26994265.

ABSTRACT: Sensory abilities decline with age. More than 5% of the world's population, approximately 360 million people, have disabling hearing loss. In adults, disabling hearing loss is defined by thresholds greater than 40 dBHL in the better hearing ear.Hearing disability is an important issue in geriatric medicine because it is associated with numerous health issues, including accelerated cognitive decline, depression, increased risk of dementia, poorer balance, falls, hospitalizations, and early mortality. There are also social implications, such as reduced communication function, social isolation, loss of autonomy, impaired driving ability, and financial decline. Furthermore, the onset of hearing loss is gradual and subtle, first affecting the detection of high-pitched sounds and with difficulty understanding speech in noisy but not in quiet environments. Consequently, delays in recognizing and seeking help for hearing difficulties are common. Age-related hearing loss has no known cure, and technologies (hearing aids, cochlear implants, and assistive devices) improve thresholds but do not restore hearing to normal. Therefore, health care for persons with hearing loss and people within their communication circles requires education and counseling (e.g., increasing knowledge, changing attitudes, and reducing stigma), behavior change (e.g., adapting communication strategies), and environmental modifications (e.g., reducing noise). In this article, we consider the causes, consequences, and magnitude of hearing loss from a life-course perspective. We examine the concept of "hearing health," how to achieve it, and implications for policy and practice.

10 Review Personal Sound Amplifiers for Adults with Hearing Loss. 2016

Mamo, Sara K / Reed, Nicholas S / Nieman, Carrie L / Oh, Esther S / Lin, Frank R. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md; Center on Aging and Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Md. Electronic address: smamo1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md; Center on Aging and Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Md. · Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md; Department of Psychiatry and Behavior Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md; Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Md. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md; Center on Aging and Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Md; Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Md. ·Am J Med · Pubmed #26498713.

ABSTRACT: Age-related hearing loss is highly prevalent and often untreated. Use of hearing aids has been associated with improvements in communication and quality of life, but such treatment is unaffordable or inaccessible for many adults. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical guide for physicians who work with older adults who are experiencing hearing and communication difficulties. Specifically, we review direct-to-consumer amplification products that can be used to address hearing loss in adults. Helping adults with hearing loss navigate hearing loss treatment options ranging from being professionally fitted with hearing aids to using direct-to-consumer amplification options is important for primary care clinicians to understand given our increasing understanding of the impact of hearing loss on cognitive, social, and physical functioning.

11 Review The effects of hearing impairment in older adults on communication partners: a systematic review. 2015

Kamil, Rebecca J / Lin, Frank R. ·Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY. · Departments of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Geriatric Medicine, Mental Health, and Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. ·J Am Acad Audiol · Pubmed #25690776.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hearing impairment is highly prevalent in older adults and can affect the daily activities of a person who is hard of hearing (HOH). The impact of hearing impairment may also have collateral effects on the primary communication partner (CP; e.g., spouse, close family member, or caregiver) of the person who is HOH. PURPOSE: We aimed to characterize the impact of hearing loss in a person who is HOH on his or her CP. RESEARCH DESIGN: We conducted a systematic review of manuscripts examining the consequences of hearing loss in a person who is HOH on the CP. We searched PubMed, Embase, Scopus, PyscINFO, CINAHL Plus with full text, and Web of Science for peer-reviewed articles using a predefined search string and hand-searched reference lists of relevant articles. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We initially screened abstracts blinded for author and journal to eliminate irrelevant and duplicate articles. Descriptive information on study populations, hearing assessments, outcome metrics, and study findings were extracted from full-length manuscripts. RESULTS: Of the 1,047 abstracts retrieved from database searching and 5 hand-searched articles, 24 articles met inclusion criteria. These articles included observational clinical studies, randomized clinical trials, and epidemiologic studies. Overall, CPs experienced a restricted social life, increased burden of communication, and poorer quality of life (QOL) and relationship satisfaction. Effects of hearing impairment on a CP's mental health were unclear. Treatment of hearing loss in the person who is HOH tended to improve QOL, communication, feelings toward the person who is HOH, and activity participation of the CP. CONCLUSIONS: This review highlights the broad effects of hearing impairment and the importance of involving CPs in hearing loss treatment decisions.

12 Review Hearing loss and cognitive decline in older adults: questions and answers. 2014

Bernabei, Roberto / Bonuccelli, Ubaldo / Maggi, Stefania / Marengoni, Alessandra / Martini, Alessandro / Memo, Maurizio / Pecorelli, Sergio / Peracino, Andrea P / Quaranta, Nicola / Stella, Roberto / Lin, Frank R / Anonymous2740808. ·Department of Geriatrics, Neuroscience and Orthopaedics, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. ·Aging Clin Exp Res · Pubmed #25281432.

ABSTRACT: The association between hearing impairment, the diagnosis of dementia, and the role of sensory therapy has been proposed for some time, but further research is needed. Current understanding of this association requires the commitment of those experts who can integrate experience and research from several fields to be able to understand the link from hearing to dementia. A workshop whose panelists included experts from many areas, ranging from ear, nose and throat (ENT) to dementia's specialists, was promoted and organized by the Giovanni Lorenzini Medical Science Foundation (Milan, Italy; Houston, TX, USA) to increase the awareness of the relationship between hearing loss and dementia, and included questions and comments following a presentation from the clinical researcher, Frank Lin, who has been evaluating the relationship between hearing loss and cognitive decline since 2009.

13 Review Current concepts in age-related hearing loss: epidemiology and mechanistic pathways. 2013

Yamasoba, Tatsuya / Lin, Frank R / Someya, Shinichi / Kashio, Akinori / Sakamoto, Takashi / Kondo, Kenji. ·Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. tyamasoba-tky@umin.ac.jp ·Hear Res · Pubmed #23422312.

ABSTRACT: Age-related hearing loss (AHL), also known as presbycusis, is a universal feature of mammalian aging and is characterized by a decline of auditory function, such as increased hearing thresholds and poor frequency resolution. The primary pathology of AHL includes the hair cells, stria vascularis, and afferent spiral ganglion neurons as well as the central auditory pathways. A growing body of evidence in animal studies has suggested that cumulative effect of oxidative stress could induce damage to macromolecules such as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and that the resulting accumulation of mtDNA mutations/deletions and decline of mitochondrial function play an important role in inducing apoptosis of the cochlear cells, thereby the development of AHL. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated four categories of risk factors of AHL in humans: cochlear aging, environment such as noise exposure, genetic predisposition, and health co-morbidities such as cigarette smoking and atherosclerosis. Genetic investigation has identified several putative associating genes, including those related to antioxidant defense and atherosclerosis. Exposure to noise is known to induce excess generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cochlea, and cumulative oxidative stress can be enhanced by relatively hypoxic situations resulting from the impaired homeostasis of cochlear blood supply due to atherosclerosis, which could be accelerated by genetic and co-morbidity factors. Antioxidant defense system may also be influenced by genetic backgrounds. These may explain the large variations of the onset and extent of AHL among elderly subjects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Annual Reviews 2013".

14 Article Association of Midlife Hypertension with Late-Life Hearing Loss. 2019

Reed, Nicholas S / Huddle, Matthew G / Betz, Joshua / Power, Melinda C / Pankow, James S / Gottesman, Rebecca / Richey Sharrett, A / Mosley, Thomas H / Lin, Frank R / Deal, Jennifer A. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Cochlear Center on Hearing and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. · School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · The MIND Center, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi, USA. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #31382849.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of midlife hypertension with late-life hearing impairment. STUDY DESIGN: Data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study, an ongoing prospective longitudinal population-based study (baseline, 1987-1989). SETTING: Washington County, Maryland, research field site. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Subjects included 248 community-dwelling men and women aged 67 to 89 years in 2013. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure were measured at each of 5 study visits from 1987-1989 to 2013. Hypertension was defined by elevated systolic or diastolic blood pressure or antihypertensive medication use. A 4-frequency (0.5-4 kHz) better-hearing ear pure tone average in decibels hearing loss (dB HL) was calculated from pure tone audiometry measured in 2013. A cutoff of 40 dB HL was used to indicate clinically significant moderate to severe hearing impairment. Hearing thresholds at 5 frequencies (0.5-8 kHz) were also considered separately. RESULTS: Forty-seven participants (19%) had hypertension at baseline (1987-1989), as opposed to 183 (74%) in 2013. The SBP association with late-life pure tone average differed by the time of measurement, with SBP measured at earlier visits associated with poorer hearing; the difference in pure tone average per 10-mm Hg SBP measured was 1.43 dB HL (95% CI, 0.32-2.53) at baseline versus -0.43 dB HL (95% CI, -1.41 to 0.55) in 2013. Baseline hypertension was associated with higher thresholds (poorer hearing) at 4 frequencies (1, 2, 4, 8 kHz). CONCLUSION: Midlife SBP was associated with poorer hearing measured 25 years later. Further analysis into the longitudinal relationship between hypertension and hearing impairment is warranted.

15 Article Audiologic profile of the jackson heart study cohort and comparison to other cohorts. 2019

Bishop, Charles E / Spankovich, Christopher / Lin, Frank R / Seals, Samantha R / Su, Dan / Valle, Karen / Schweinfurth, John M. ·The Department of Otolaryngology and Communicative Sciences, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head/Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A. · Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of West Florida, Pensacola, Florida. · Department of Data Science, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi. ·Laryngoscope · Pubmed #30889290.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: The objective of this study was to determine the audiological profile of an African American cohort, identify related factors, and compare them to other datasets. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional, longitudinal cohort study. METHODS: The Jackson Heart Study (JHS) is a longitudinal cohort study of 5,306 African Americans living in the metropolitan Jackson, Mississippi area, with a focus on cardiometabolic health. The JHS Hearing Study (n = 1,314) was implemented to measure the prevalence of hearing, tinnitus, and balance outcomes and relationship to predictor variables. Here we present prevalence and covariate relationships in comparison to the Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. RESULTS: The prevalence of self-reported hearing difficulty was 38.1% (n = 500). The prevalence of hearing loss based on audiometric pure tone threshold average (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 kHz) of the better ear was 19.8% (n = 260) and for the worse ear 29.8% (n = 392). The prevalence of tinnitus was 29.5% (n = 388) and balance dysfunction 24.1% (n = 317). Relationships of hearing loss to demographic, cardiometabolic, and audiologic variables are presented. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that hearing loss, tinnitus, and balance dysfunction are common issues affecting adult African Americans, and that hearing loss is related to numerous modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors. Furthermore, our findings are consistent with lower prevalence of hearing loss in African Americans compared to the non-African American populations. However, despite the lower audiometric evidence of hearing loss, nearly 40% of participants reported hearing difficulty. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2b Laryngoscope, 129:2391-2397, 2019.

16 Article Quantification of Hearing Loss Research on Children Compared With Older Adults. 2019

Villavisanis, Dillan F / Lin, Frank R / Deal, Jennifer A. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. ·JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #30653206.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Article Access To Hearing Care Services Among Older Medicare Beneficiaries Using Hearing Aids. 2019

Willink, Amber / Reed, Nicholas S / Lin, Frank R. ·Amber Willink ( awillin2@jhu.edu ) is an assistant scientist in the Department of Health Policy and Management and in the Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health, both at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, in Baltimore, Maryland. · Nicholas S. Reed is an assistant professor in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, in Baltimore, and in the Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. · Frank R. Lin is an associate professor in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and in the Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. ·Health Aff (Millwood) · Pubmed #30615534.

ABSTRACT: The Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act of 2017 will soon allow people to purchase hearing aids without an audiologist or hearing aid dispenser acting as a go-between. Under this new arrangement there will be no guarantee that purchasers with hearing loss will have access to the hearing care services that are often needed to optimize hearing and communication with the devices. Using data for 2013 from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey, we examined existing barriers to accessing those services among older Medicare beneficiaries who owned and used hearing aids. Within this population, beneficiaries who were dually eligible for Medicaid had 41 percent lower odds of using hearing care services and were twice as likely to report having a lot of trouble hearing with their aids, compared to high-income Medicare beneficiaries. Existing barriers to device owners' receiving hearing care services are likely to be exacerbated when over-the-counter sales further separate the purchase of hearing aids from payment for supportive services. Coverage of hearing care services under the Medicare program should be considered to address income-related constraints to service access.

18 Article Incident Hearing Loss and Comorbidity: A Longitudinal Administrative Claims Study. 2019

Deal, Jennifer A / Reed, Nicholas S / Kravetz, Alexander D / Weinreich, Heather / Yeh, Charlotte / Lin, Frank R / Altan, Aylin. ·Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. · OptumLabs, Cambridge, Massachusetts. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago. · AARP Services, Inc, Washington, DC. ·JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #30419134.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Because hearing loss is highly prevalent and treatable, determining its association with morbidity has major public health implications for disease prevention and the maintenance of health in adults with hearing loss. Objective: To investigate the association between the diagnosis of incident hearing loss and medical comorbidities in adults 50 years or older. Design, Setting, and Participants: Retrospective, propensity-matched cohort study using administrative claims data from commercially insured and Medicare Advantage members in a geographically diverse US health plan. Adults 50 years or older with claims for services rendered from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2016, were observed for 2 (n = 154 414), 5 (n = 44 852), and 10 (n = 4728) years. This research was conceptualized and data were analyzed between September 2016 and November 2017. Exposures: A claim for incident hearing loss is defined as 2 claims for hearing loss within 2 consecutive years without evidence of hearing device use, excluding claims for sudden hearing loss or hearing loss secondary to medical conditions. Main Outcomes and Measures: Incident claims for dementia, depression, accidental falls, nonvertebral fractures, acute myocardial infarction, and stroke. Results: After cohort matching, 48% of participants were women (n = 74 464), 61% were white (n = 93 442), and 31% (n = 48 056) were Medicare Advantage insured, with a mean (SD) age of 64 (10) years. In a multivariate-adjusted modified Poisson regression with robust standard errors, relative associations were strongest for dementia (relative risk at 5 years, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.38-1.64) and depression (relative risk at 5 years, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.26-1.58). The absolute risk of all outcomes was greater in persons with hearing loss than in those without hearing loss at all times, with the greatest risk difference observed at 10 years for all outcomes. The 10-year risk attributable to hearing loss was 3.20 per 100 persons (95% CI, 1.76-4.63) for dementia, 3.57 per 100 persons (95% CI, 1.67-5.47) for falls, and 6.88 per 100 persons (95% CI, 4.62-9.14) for depression. Conclusions and Relevance: In this large observational study using administrative claims data, incident untreated hearing loss was associated with greater incident morbidity than no hearing loss across a range of health conditions. Future studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these associations and to determine if treatment for hearing loss could reduce the risk of comorbidity.

19 Article Trends in Health Care Costs and Utilization Associated With Untreated Hearing Loss Over 10 Years. 2019

Reed, Nicholas S / Altan, Aylin / Deal, Jennifer A / Yeh, Charlotte / Kravetz, Alexander D / Wallhagen, Margaret / Lin, Frank R. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · OptumLabs, Cambridge, Massachusetts. · Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. · AARP Services, Inc, Washington, DC. · University of California San Francisco School of Nursing, San Francisco. ·JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #30419131.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Nearly 38 million individuals in the United States have untreated hearing loss, which is associated with cognitive and functional decline. National initiatives to address hearing loss are currently under way. Objective: To determine whether untreated hearing loss is associated with increased health care cost and utilization on the basis of data from a claims database. Design, Setting, and Participants: Retrospective, propensity-matched cohort study of persons with and without untreated hearing loss based on claims for health services rendered between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2016, from a large health insurance database. There were 154 414, 44 852, and 4728 participants at the 2-, 5-, and 10-year follow-up periods, respectively. The study was conceptualized and data were analyzed between September 2016 and November 2017. Exposures: Untreated hearing loss (ie, hearing loss that has not been treated with hearing devices) was identified via claims measures. Main Outcomes and Measures: Medical costs, inpatient hospitalizations, total days hospitalized, 30-day hospital readmission, emergency department visits, and days with at least 1 outpatient visit. Results: Among 4728 matched adults (mean age at baseline, 61 years; 2280 women and 2448 men), untreated hearing loss was associated with $22 434 (95% CI, $18 219-$26 648) or 46% higher total health care costs over a 10-year period compared with costs for those without hearing loss. Persons with untreated hearing loss experienced more inpatient stays (incidence rate ratio, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.29-1.68) and were at greater risk for 30-day hospital readmission (relative risk, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.14-1.81) at 10 years postindex. Similar trends were observed at 2- and 5-year time points across measures. Conclusions and Relevance: Older adults with untreated hearing loss experience higher health care costs and utilization patterns compared with adults without hearing loss. To further define this association, additional research on mediators, such as treatment adherence, and mitigation strategies is needed.

20 Article Hearing Loss Treatment in Older Adults With Cognitive Impairment: A Systematic Review. 2018

Mamo, Sara K / Reed, Nicholas S / Price, Carrie / Occhipinti, Dona / Pletnikova, Alexandra / Lin, Frank R / Oh, Esther S. ·University of Massachusetts Amherst. · Johns Hopkins University Center on Aging and Health, Baltimore, MD. · Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD. ·J Speech Lang Hear Res · Pubmed #30304320.

ABSTRACT: Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review was to assess studies of treating hearing loss in older adults with cognitive impairment. Of interest to this review is identifying clinical adaptations that may be used to tailor hearing loss treatment to older adults with cognitive impairment in order to better serve this vulnerable population. Method: A systematic search with controlled vocabulary and key word terms was applied to PubMed, the Cochrane Library, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. Search concepts included terms related to hearing loss and cognitive impairment. The overall search resulted in 4,945 unique references, 50 of which were eligible for full-text review and 13 of which were included in the final review. Included manuscripts were categorized according to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's levels of evidence and the National Institutes of Health Quality Assessment Tools. Results: Only 1 study implemented a randomized controlled trial design to assess cognitive function and behavioral symptoms after treatment with hearing aids. Other quasiexperimental studies evaluated dementia-related symptoms and/or auditory function after treating hearing loss in pre/post research designs. Finally, evidence from case studies suggested that hearing loss treatment is feasible, reduces stressful communication for caregivers, and improves dementia-related behavior problems. Conclusion: Based on the systematic review, evidence suggests that treating hearing loss in persons with cognitive impairment can have benefits to communication and quality of life. Because of the quasi- and nonexperimental nature of most of the evidence found in this review, further studies are necessary to understand the effect of treatment in the context of a variable and progressive disease.

21 Article Pilot Study of Audiometric Patterns in Fuchs Corneal Dystrophy. 2018

Reed, Nicholas S / Deal, Jennifer A / Huddle, Matthew G / Betz, Joshua F / Bailey, Bethany E / McGlumphy, Elyse J / Eghrari, Allen O / Riazuddin, S Amer / Lin, Frank R / Gottsch, John D. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Center on Aging and Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD. · The Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. ·J Speech Lang Hear Res · Pubmed #30286242.

ABSTRACT: Purpose: Although Fuchs corneal dystrophy (FCD) is considered an eye disease, a small number of studies have identified genes related to both FCD and hearing loss. Whether FCD is related to hearing loss is unknown. Method: This is a case-control study comparing pure-tone audiometry hearing thresholds in 180 patients with FCD from a hospital-based ophthalmology clinic with 2,575 population-based controls from a nationally representative survey, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (from cycles 2005-06 and 2009-10). Generalized estimating equations were used to compare mean better-hearing ear thresholds in the 2 groups adjusted for age, sex, race, and noise exposure. Results: Patients with FCD had higher hearing thresholds (worse hearing) in lower frequencies (mean difference at 0.5 kHz = 3.49 dB HL) and lower hearing thresholds (better hearing) in higher frequencies (difference at 4 kHz = -4.25 dB HL) compared with population-based controls. Conclusion: In the first study to use objectively measured hearing, FCD was associated with poorer low-frequency and better high-frequency audiometric thresholds than population controls. Further studies are needed to characterize this relationship.

22 Article American Geriatrics Society and National Institute on Aging Bench-to-Bedside Conference: Sensory Impairment and Cognitive Decline in Older Adults. 2018

Whitson, Heather E / Cronin-Golomb, Alice / Cruickshanks, Karen J / Gilmore, Grover C / Owsley, Cynthia / Peelle, Jonathan E / Recanzone, Gregg / Sharma, Anu / Swenor, Bonnielin / Yaffe, Kristine / Lin, Frank R. ·School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. · Geriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Durham Veterans Affairs, Durham, North Carolina. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin. · Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. · Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri. · University of California, Davis, Davis, California. · University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado. · Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California. ·J Am Geriatr Soc · Pubmed #30248173.

ABSTRACT: This article summarizes the presentations and recommendations of the tenth annual American Geriatrics Society and National Institute on Aging Bench-to-Bedside research conference, "Sensory Impairment and Cognitive Decline," on October 2-3, 2017, in Bethesda, Maryland. The risk of impairment in hearing, vision, and other senses increases with age, and almost 15% of individuals aged 70 and older have dementia. As the number of older adults increases, sensory and cognitive impairments will affect a growing proportion of the population. To limit its scope, this conference focused on sensory impairments affecting vision and hearing. Comorbid vision, hearing, and cognitive impairments in older adults are more common than would be expected by chance alone, suggesting that some common mechanisms might affect these neurological systems. This workshop explored the mechanisms and consequences of comorbid vision, hearing, and cognitive impairment in older adults; effects of sensory loss on the aging brain; and bench-to-bedside innovations and research opportunities. Presenters and participants identified many research gaps and questions; the top priorities fell into 3 themes: mechanisms, measurement, and interventions. The workshop delineated specific research questions that provide opportunities to improve outcomes in this growing population. J Am Geriatr Soc 66:2052-2058, 2018.

23 Article Hearing Care Access?: Focus on Clinical Services, Not Devices. 2018

Reed, Nicholas S / Lin, Frank R / Willink, Amber. ·Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. ·JAMA · Pubmed #30242394.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Article State of research and program development for adults with hearing loss. 2018

McKee, Michael M / Lin, Frank R / Zazove, Philip. ·Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. Electronic address: mmmckee@med.umich.edu. · Department of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery, John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. ·Disabil Health J · Pubmed #30087082.

ABSTRACT: Hearing loss is common with a growing body of evidence of its global impact on our patient population. There remains much to learn about the mechanisms and epidemiologic, genetic, and other biobehavioral risk factors associated with hearing loss and its chronic disease sequelae, as well as how hearing healthcare, surveillance, and clinician-based training programs can best reduce the overall health burden among older individuals with hearing loss. This paper provides an update on the state of research for adults with hearing loss. The goal of the paper is to educate the reader on what is known and highlight areas where further work is still needed.

25 Article Dual sensory impairment: The association between glaucomatous vision loss and hearing impairment and function. 2018

Mudie, Lucy I / Varadaraj, Varshini / Gajwani, Prateek / Munoz, Beatriz / Ramulu, Pradeep / Lin, Frank R / Swenor, Bonnielin K / Friedman, David S / Zebardast, Nazlee. ·Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #29979753.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hearing impairment, vision impairment, and dual impairment (both hearing and vision impairment), have been independently associated with functional and cognitive decline. In prior studies of dual impairment, vision impairment is generally not defined or defined by visual acuity alone. Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness and does not affect visual acuity until late in the disease; instead, visual field loss is used to measure vision impairment from glaucoma. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of glaucomatous visual field loss and hearing impairment on function. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Hospital-based clinic in Baltimore, Maryland. SUBJECTS: 220 adults, ≥55 years presenting to the glaucoma clinic. METHODS: Vision impairment was defined as mean deviation on visual field testing worse than -5 decibels in the better eye, and hearing impairment was defined as pure tone average worse than 25 decibels on threshold audiometry testing in the better ear. Standardized questionnaires were used to assess functional status. RESULTS: Five participants were excluded for incomplete testing, leaving 32 with vision impairment only, 63 with hearing impairment only, 42 with dual impairment, and 78 controls with no hearing impairment or vision impairment. Participants with dual impairment were more likely to be older and non-White. Dual impairment was associated with significantly more severe driving limitation and more difficulty with communication compared to those without sensory impairment when adjusted for age, race, gender and number of comorbidities. CONCLUSION: Older individuals with glaucoma and hearing loss seem to have generally poorer functioning than those with single sensory loss. Health professionals should consider visual field loss as a type of vision impairment when managing patients with dual impairment.

Next