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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Arve Lie
Based on 8 articles published since 2010
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, A. Lie wrote the following 8 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Occupational noise exposure and hearing: a systematic review. 2016

Lie, Arve / Skogstad, Marit / Johannessen, Håkon A / Tynes, Tore / Mehlum, Ingrid Sivesind / Nordby, Karl-Christian / Engdahl, Bo / Tambs, Kristian. ·National Institute of Occupational Health, P.O. Box 8149 Dep., 0033, Oslo, Norway. arve.lie@stami.no. · National Institute of Occupational Health, P.O. Box 8149 Dep., 0033, Oslo, Norway. · Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. ·Int Arch Occup Environ Health · Pubmed #26249711.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To give a systematic review of the development of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in working life. METHODS: A literature search in MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, and Health and Safety Abstracts, with appropriate keywords on noise in the workplace and health, revealed 22,413 articles which were screened by six researchers. A total of 698 articles were reviewed in full text and scored with a checklist, and 187 articles were found to be relevant and of sufficient quality for further analysis. RESULTS: Occupational noise exposure causes between 7 and 21 % of the hearing loss among workers, lowest in the industrialized countries, where the incidence is going down, and highest in the developing countries. It is difficult to distinguish between NIHL and age-related hearing loss at an individual level. Most of the hearing loss is age related. Men lose hearing more than women do. Heredity also plays a part. Socioeconomic position, ethnicity and other factors, such as smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, vibration and chemical substances, may also affect hearing. The use of firearms may be harmful to hearing, whereas most other sources of leisure-time noise seem to be less important. Impulse noise seems to be more deleterious to hearing than continuous noise. Occupational groups at high risk of NIHL are the military, construction workers, agriculture and others with high noise exposure. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of NIHL is declining in most industrialized countries, probably due to preventive measures. Hearing loss is mainly related to increasing age.

2 Article Occupational noise exposure, hearing loss, and notched audiograms in the HUNT Nord-Trøndelag hearing loss study, 1996-1998. 2017

Lie, Arve / Engdahl, Bo / Hoffman, Howard J / Li, Chuan-Ming / Tambs, Kristian. ·Department of Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology, National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway. · Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. · Epidemiology and Statistics Program, Division of Scientific Programs, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, U.S.A. ·Laryngoscope · Pubmed #27696439.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To study the prevalence and usefulness of audiometric notches in the diagnosis of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). STUDY DESIGN: Audiograms and data on noise exposure from 23,297 men and 26,477 women, aged 20 to 101 years, from the Nord-Trøndelag Hearing Loss Study, 1996-1998. METHODS: The prevalence of four types of audiometric notches (Coles, Hoffman, Wilson) and 4 kHz notch were computed in relation to occupational noise exposure, age, sex, and report of recurrent ear infections. RESULTS: The prevalence of notches in the 3 to 6 kHz range (Wilson, Hoffman, and Coles) ranged from 50% to 60% in subjects without occupational noise exposure, and 60% to 70% in the most occupationally noise-exposed men. The differences were statistically significant only for bilateral notches. For 4 kHz notches, the prevalence varied from 25% in occupationally nonexposed to 35% in the most occupationally exposed men, and the differences were statistically significant for both bilateral and unilateral notches. For women, the prevalence of notches was lower than in men, especially for 4 kHz notches, and the differences between occupationally noise exposed and nonexposed were smaller. Recreational exposure to high music was not associated with notched audiograms. CONCLUSIONS: The detection of bilateral notches and unilateral 4 kHz notches is of some value in diagnosing NIHL, especially in men. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4 Laryngoscope, 127:1442-1450, 2017.

3 Article Simplified risk assessment of noise induced hearing loss by means of 2 spreadsheet models. 2016

Lie, Arve / Engdahl, Bo / Tambs, Kristian. ·National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway (Department of Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology). arve.lie@stami.no. · Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. bo.engdahl@fhi.no. · Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Kristian.Tambs@fhi.no. ·Int J Occup Med Environ Health · Pubmed #27869248.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study has been to test 2 spreadsheet models to compare the observed with the expected hearing loss for a Norwegian reference population. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The prevalence rates of the Norwegian and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) definitions of hearing outcomes were calculated in terms of sex and age, 20-64 years old, for a screened (with no occupational noise exposure) (N = 18 858) and unscreened (N = 38 333) Norwegian reference population from the Nord-Trøndelag Hearing Loss Study (NTHLS). Based on the prevalence rates, 2 different spreadsheet models were constructed in order to compare the prevalence rates of various groups of workers with the expected rates. The spreadsheets were then tested on 10 different occupational groups with varying degrees of hearing loss as compared to a reference population. RESULTS: Hearing of office workers, train drivers, conductors and teachers differed little from the screened reference values based on the Norwegian and the NIOSH criterion. The construction workers, miners, farmers and military had an impaired hearing and railway maintenance workers and bus drivers had a mildly impaired hearing. The spreadsheet models give a valid assessment of the hearing loss. CONCLUSIONS: The use of spreadsheet models to compare hearing in occupational groups with that of a reference population is a simple and quick method. The results are in line with comparable hearing thresholds, and allow for significance testing. The method is believed to be useful for occupational health services in the assessment of risk of noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) and the preventive potential in groups of noise-exposed workers. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2016;29(6):991-999.

4 Article Noise-induced hearing loss in a longitudinal study of Norwegian railway workers. 2016

Lie, Arve / Skogstad, Marit / Johnsen, Torstein Seip / Engdahl, Bo / Tambs, Kristian. ·Department of Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology, National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway. · Occupational Health Service, Norwegian State Railways (NSB), Oslo, Norway. · Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #27591022.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyse longitudinal data to assess the risk of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in Norwegian railway workers. DESIGN: Longitudinal. SETTING: A major Norwegian railway company. METHODS: We examined data from the first and last audiograms for the period 1991-2014, from 9640 railway workers with varying occupational noise exposure and with an average observation period of 10 years. The course of hearing acuity in seven groups of railway workers (train drivers, conductors, bus drivers, traffic controllers, train maintenance workers, track maintenance workers and others) were compared with each other and with ISO standards (ISO 1999). RESULTS: The change in hearing threshold during the observation period was 2-3 dB in the 0.5-4 kHz range and 6-7 dB in the 3-6 kHz range adjusted for age and sex, for all occupational groups, which is slightly less than expected (8 dB) according to ISO 1999. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of NIHL in Norwegian railway workers during the period 1991-2014 has been negligible.

5 Article Cardiovascular risk factors and hearing loss: The HUNT study. 2015

Engdahl, Bo / Aarhus, Lisa / Lie, Arve / Tambs, Kristian. ·a Division of Mental Health , Norwegian Institute of Public Health , Nydalen , Oslo , Norway. · b National Institute of Occupational Health , Department of Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology , Oslo , Norway. ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #26642893.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present paper was to examine the association between prospectively and cross-sectionally assessed cardiovascular risk factors and hearing loss. DESIGN: Hearing was assessed by pure-tone average thresholds at low (0.25-0.5 kHz), middle (1-2 kHz), and high (3-8 kHz) frequencies. Self-reported or measured cardiovascular risk factors were assessed both 11 years before and simultaneously with the audiometric assessment. Cardiovascular risk factors were smoking, alcohol use, physical inactivity, waist circumference, body mass index, resting heart rate, blood pressure, triglycerides, total serum cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and diabetes. STUDY SAMPLE: A population-based cohort of 31 547 subjects. RESULTS: After adjustment for age, sex, level of education, income, recurrent ear infections, and noise exposure, risk factors associated with poorer hearing sensitivity were smoking, diabetes, physical inactivity, resting heart rate, and waist circumference. Smoking was only associated with hearing loss at high frequencies. The effects were very small, in combination explaining only 0.2-0.4% of the variance in addition to the component explained by age and the other cofactors. CONCLUSION: This cohort study indicates that, although many cardiovascular risk factors are associated with hearing loss, the effects are small and of doubtful clinical relevance.

6 Article The prevalence of notched audiograms in a cross-sectional study of 12,055 railway workers. 2015

Lie, Arve / Skogstad, Marit / Johnsen, Torstein Seip / Engdahl, Bo / Tambs, Kristian. ·1Department of Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology, National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway; 2Norwegian State Railways (NSB) Occupational Health Service, Oslo, Norway; and 3Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. ·Ear Hear · Pubmed #25470371.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is one of the most reported occupational diseases internationally. The occurrence of audiometric notches is emphasized in both American and European guidelines for the diagnosis of NIHL. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of notched audiograms among railway personnel with and without noise exposure to better assess the usefulness of such notches in the diagnosis of NIHL. DESIGN: The most recent audiogram from 1994 to 2011 of a total of 12,055 railway workers, age 20 to 65 years, was obtained from the medical records of the occupational health service of the Norwegian State Railways (NSB). The prevalences of three types of notched audiograms, Coles notch, notch index, and 4 kHz notch, were computed, in relation to age, sex, and occupational noise exposure. RESULTS: Coles notch in either ear was found in 63% of the male railway maintenance workers, exposed to noise levels of 75 to 90 dB(A), compared with 53% of the non-noise exposed (<70 dB(A)) traffic controllers (p < 0.001). The corresponding figures for the 4 kHz notch were 31% versus 21% (p < 0.001). For the notch index, 61% of the exposed and 51% of the controls had a notched audiogram (p < 0.001). For female workers, the prevalence of audiometric notches was lower, and the differences between noise exposed and nonexposed was smaller than those in men. Increasing age led to an increased prevalence of notches. CONCLUSIONS: Audiometric notches commonly occur among both noise-exposed and those not exposed to noise in railway personnel. The usefulness of audiometric notches in the diagnosis of NIHL is therefore limited.

7 Article A cross-sectional study of hearing thresholds among 4627 Norwegian train and track maintenance workers. 2014

Lie, Arve / Skogstad, Marit / Johnsen, Torstein Seip / Engdahl, Bo / Tambs, Kristian. ·Department of Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology, National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway. · Norwegian State Railways (NSB) Occupational Health Service, Oslo, Norway. · Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #25324318.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Railway workers performing maintenance work of trains and tracks could be at risk of developing noise-induced hearing loss, since they are exposed to noise levels of 75-90 dB(A) with peak exposures of 130-140 dB(C). The objective was to make a risk assessment by comparing the hearing thresholds among train and track maintenance workers with a reference group not exposed to noise and reference values from the ISO 1999. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: A major Norwegian railway company. PARTICIPANTS: 1897 and 2730 male train and track maintenance workers, respectively, all exposed to noise, and 2872 male railway traffic controllers and office workers not exposed to noise. OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was the hearing threshold (pure tone audiometry, frequencies from 0.5 to 8 kHz), and the secondary outcome was the prevalence of audiometric notches (Coles notch) of the most recent audiogram. RESULTS: Train and track maintenance workers aged 45 years or older had a small mean hearing loss in the 3-6 kHz area of 3-5 dB. The hearing loss was less among workers younger than 45 years. Audiometric notches were slightly more prevalent among the noise exposed (59-64%) group compared with controls (49%) for all age groups. They may therefore be a sensitive measure in disclosing an early hearing loss at a group level. CONCLUSIONS: Train and track maintenance workers aged 45 years or older, on average, have a slightly greater hearing loss and more audiometric notches compared with reference groups not exposed to noise. Younger (<45 years) workers have hearing thresholds comparable to the controls.

8 Article Hearing status among Norwegian train drivers and train conductors. 2013

Lie, A / Skogstad, M / Johnsen, T S / Engdahl, B / Tambs, K. ·Department of Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology, National Institute of Occupational Health, PO Box 8149 Dep, N-0033 Oslo, Norway. ·Occup Med (Lond) · Pubmed #24204021.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is a general perception that train drivers and conductors may be at increased risk of developing noise-induced hearing loss. AIMS: To study job-related hearing loss among train drivers and train conductors. METHODS: Audiograms from train drivers and train conductors were obtained from the medical records of the occupational health service of the major Norwegian railway company. The results were compared with audiograms from an internal control group of railway workers and an external reference group of people not occupationally exposed to noise. The monaural hearing threshold level at 4kHz, the mean binaural value at 3, 4 and 6kHz and the prevalence of audiometric notches (≥25 dB at 4kHz) were used for comparison. RESULTS: Audiograms were available for 1567 drivers, 1565 conductors, 4029 railway worker controls and 15 012 people not occupationally exposed to noise. No difference in hearing level or prevalence of audiometric notches was found between study groups after adjusting for age and gender. CONCLUSIONS: Norwegian train drivers and conductors have normal hearing threshold levels comparable with those in non-exposed groups.