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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Yong-Xin Li
Based on 20 articles published since 2009
(Why 20 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Yongxin Li wrote the following 20 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Early detection of hearing impairment in patients with diabetes mellitus with otoacoustic emission. A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2017

Hao, Jin / Fu, Xinxing / Zhang, Chunfang / Zhang, Xuelian / Zhao, Shouqin / Li, Yongxin. ·a Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery , Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University , Beijing , PR China. · b Beijing Institute of Otolaryngology, Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (Capital Medical University) , Ministry of Education , Beijing , PR China. · c Department of Bioinformatic , Wuerzburg University , Wuerzburg , Germany. · d Department of Endocrinology , Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University , Beijing , PR China. ·Acta Otolaryngol · Pubmed #27632340.

ABSTRACT: CONCLUSIONS: The distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) amplitudes in diabetics were significantly lower than those in controls when pure tone audiometry (PTA) was within normal limits, implying cochlear function impairment in the early stage of diabetes mellitus. Retrocochlear damage was suggested by elongated wave latencies and the wave interval of auditory brainstem response (ABR) in diabetics. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to systematically analyze the application of DPOAE in evaluation of the hearing function of diabetics. DATA SOURCES AND REVIEW METHODS: Eligible articles were identified through searches of nine different electronic databases. Two investigators reviewed the original articles independently, with pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Meta-analyses were conducted by using Metan module. RESULTS: There were seven articles eligible for the analysis. PTA thresholds were within normal limits in all diabetics at low-middle frequencies. The mean DPOAE amplitudes of diabetics were significantly lower than those of controls. The standardized mean difference (SMD) (95% CI) was -0.49 (-0.70, -0.27), -0.46 (-0.63, -0.30), and -0.60 (-0.77, -0.43) at 1, 2, and 4 kHz, respectively. The latencies of waves I, III, and V in diabetes were significantly longer than those of controls (0.43 (0.23, 0.64), 0.54 (0.33, 0.75), and 0.56 (0.35, 0.77), respectively). The wave interval I-V was significantly longer in diabetics (p < .001, 0.47 [0.24, 0.70]).

2 Review Salivary gland choristoma of the middle ear. 2015

Chen, Shubin / Li, Yongxin. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, PR China 100005. ·Ear Nose Throat J · Pubmed #25651359.

ABSTRACT: Salivary gland choristoma of the middle ear is a rare entity. It is believed to be a developmental abnormality that may be associated with anomalies of adjacent structures. We describe the case of a 6-year-old girl who had a salivary gland choristoma in the middle ear that was associated with an ossicular chain anomaly and a facial nerve anomaly. We discuss the clinical features and management of this condition, and we review the literature.

3 Clinical Trial Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of human peripheral blood reveals susceptibility loci of diabetes-related hearing loss. 2018

Hao, Jin / Hua, Lin / Fu, Xinxing / Zhang, Xuelian / Zou, Qijuan / Li, Yongxin. ·Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital of Capital Medical University, 100730, Beijing, China. jinhaotjmed@hotmail.com. · Department of Biomedical Informatics, School of Biomedical Engineering of Capital Medical University, 100069, Beijing, China. · Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (Capital Medical University), Ministry of Education, Beijing Institute of Otolaryngology, 100005, Beijing, China. · Department of Endocrinology, Beijing Tongren Hospital of Capital Medical University, 100730, Beijing, China. · Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital of Capital Medical University, 100730, Beijing, China. · Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital of Capital Medical University, 100730, Beijing, China. liyxluck@126.com. ·J Hum Genet · Pubmed #30209346.

ABSTRACT: Diabetes-related hearing loss (DRHL) is a complication of diabetes mellitus that is drawing more attention currently. DNA methylation has a critical role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its complications. Therefore, we investigated the genome-wide DNA methylation of peripheral blood of T2DM patients with/without hearing loss in order to explore the susceptibility loci of DRHL. Between DRHL group and control group, 113 gene sites were identified to be differentially methylated regions (DMRs). Among 38 DMRs with whole samples, the classification accuracy is up to 90%. With alignment to T2DM susceptibility genes and deafness genes published, KCNJ11 was found to be the only overlapped gene. The DNA methylation level of KCNJ11 was associated with stroke (t = 2.595, p < 0.05), but not with diabetic nephropathy and diabetic retinopathy. The detective rate of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) from low to high frequencies (0.7-6 kHz) on the right ear was significantly correlated with the methylation level of KCNJ11. The auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold on the right ear was also correlated (r = 0.678, p < 0.05). This DNA methylation profile indicates the susceptibility loci of DRHL. The potassium metabolism may have a critical role in the hearing loss caused by hyperglycemia.

4 Clinical Trial Quality standards for bone conduction implants. 2015

Gavilan, Javier / Adunka, Oliver / Agrawal, Sumit / Atlas, Marcus / Baumgartner, Wolf-Dieter / Brill, Stefan / Bruce, Iain / Buchman, Craig / Caversaccio, Marco / De Bodt, Marc T / Dillon, Meg / Godey, Benoit / Green, Kevin / Gstoettner, Wolfgang / Hagen, Rudolf / Hagr, Abdulrahman / Han, Demin / Kameswaran, Mohan / Karltorp, Eva / Kompis, Martin / Kuzovkov, Vlad / Lassaletta, Luis / Li, Yongxin / Lorens, Artur / Martin, Jane / Manoj, Manikoth / Mertens, Griet / Mlynski, Robert / Mueller, Joachim / O'Driscoll, Martin / Parnes, Lorne / Pulibalathingal, Sasidharan / Radeloff, Andreas / Raine, Christopher H / Rajan, Gunesh / Rajeswaran, Ranjith / Schmutzhard, Joachim / Skarzynski, Henryk / Skarzynski, Piotr / Sprinzl, Georg / Staecker, Hinrich / Stephan, Kurt / Sugarova, Serafima / Tavora, Dayse / Usami, Shin-Ichi / Yanov, Yuri / Zernotti, Mario / Zorowka, Patrick / de Heyning, Paul Van. ·a 1 Hospital La Paz , Madrid, Spain. · b 2 The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery , Columbus, OH, USA. · c 3 London Health Sciences Centre , London-Ontario, Canada. · d 4 Ear Science Institute Australia, University of Western Australia , Subiaco, Australia. · e 5 Ear, Nose and Throat Department, University Clinic Vienna , Austria. · f 6 Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic and Polyclinic, Würzburg University , Würzburg, Germany. · g 7 Manchester Auditory Implant, Central Manchester University Hospitals , Manchester, UK. · h 8 The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine , Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · i 9 Bern University Hospital, University Clinic for Ear, Nose, Throat, Head and Neck Surgery , Bern, Switzerland. · j 10 Antwerp University Hospital , Antwerp, Belgium. · k 11 University Hospital of Rennes , Rennes, France. · l 12 King Abdulaziz University Hospital, King Saud University KSU , Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. · m 13 Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University , Beijing, PR China. · o 15 Karolinska University Hospital , Stockholm, Sweden. · p 16 St. Petersburg ENT and Speech Research Institute , St. Petersburg, Russia. · q 17 Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing , Kajetany, Poland. · r 18 Bradford Royal Infirmary , Bradford, UK. · s 19 ENT Super Specialty Institute and Research Center , Kozhikode, India. · t 20 Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic and Polyclinic, Rostock Medical University , Rostock, Germany. · u 21 Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic and Polyclinic, Ludwig-Maximilians-University , Munich, Germany. · n 14 Madras ENT Research Foundation , Chennai, India. · v 22 Innsbruck University Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic , Innsbruck, Austria. · w 23 Ear, Nose and Throat Department, University Clinic St. Poelten , St. Poelten, Austria. · x 24 Kansas University Center for Balance and Hearing Disorders , Kansas City, USA. · y 25 Shinshu University School of Medicine , Matsumoto, Japan. · z 26 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Sanatorium Allende , Cordoba, Argentina. ·Acta Otolaryngol · Pubmed #26223816.

ABSTRACT: CONCLUSION: Bone conduction implants are useful in patients with conductive and mixed hearing loss for whom conventional surgery or hearing aids are no longer an option. They may also be used in patients affected by single-sided deafness. OBJECTIVES: To establish a consensus on the quality standards required for centers willing to create a bone conduction implant program. METHOD: To ensure a consistently high level of service and to provide patients with the best possible solution the members of the HEARRING network have established a set of quality standards for bone conduction implants. These standards constitute a realistic minimum attainable by all implant clinics and should be employed alongside current best practice guidelines. RESULTS: Fifteen items are thoroughly analyzed. They include team structure, accommodation and clinical facilities, selection criteria, evaluation process, complete preoperative and surgical information, postoperative fitting and assessment, follow-up, device failure, clinical management, transfer of care and patient complaints.

5 Article Speech development in young children with Mondini dysplasia who had undergone cochlear implantation. 2019

Qi, Shuang / Kong, Ying / Xu, Tianqiu / Dong, Ruijuan / Lv, Jing / Wang, Xianlei / Qi, Beier / Wang, Shuo / Yan, Fei / Li, Yongxin / Huang, Lihui / Chen, Xueqing. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, And Beijing Institute of Otolaryngology, Beijing, 100005, China. · Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 100730, China. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, And Beijing Institute of Otolaryngology, Beijing, 100005, China. Electronic address: huangpub@126.com. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, And Beijing Institute of Otolaryngology, Beijing, 100005, China. Electronic address: xueqingchen2006@aliyun.com. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #30554681.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the development of speech skills in young children with Mondini dysplasia and age-matched deaf children with radiologically normal inner ears over a period of 5 years after cochlear implantation (CI). METHODS: In total, 700 congenitally severely to profoundly deaf children (281 girls and 419 boys) participated in this study. All of the participants had undergone unilateral CI surgery before 36 months of age. The participants were categorized into two groups based on the absence or presence of Mondini dysplasia in the implanted ear, as assessed via high-resolution, thin-slice computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging: group A comprised 592 children with radiologically normal inner ears and group B comprised 108 children with Mondini dysplasia. The Meaningful Use of Speech Scale (MUSS) and Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) were used to evaluate the speech performance of all young children at various time points: pre-surgery and at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months after switch-on programming. RESULTS: The mean scores of SIR and MUSS in children from both group A and group B showed significant improvements over time. No significant differences were found in the mean scores of SIR between the two groups at any time interval during the 5-year follow-up. The mean score of MUSS was significantly different between group A and group B at 12, 24, and 36 months after implantation, whereas no obvious differences were noted pre-surgery, and at 1, 3, 6, 48, and 60 months post-operation. CONCLUSIONS: Young children with Mondini dysplasia develop their speech skills at a fast rate and achieve similar speech acquisition compared to age-matched children with radiologically normal inner ears 5 years post-operation. Therefore, CI is an effective intervention method for young children with Mondini dysplasia.

6 Article Slotted labyrinthotomy approach with customized electrode for patients with common cavity deformity. 2018

Wei, Xingmei / Li, Yongxin / Fu, Qian-Jie / Gong, Yue / Chen, Biao / Chen, Jingyuan / Shi, Ying / Su, Qiaotong / Cui, Danmo / Liu, Ting. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. · Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A. . ·Laryngoscope · Pubmed #28498488.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Cochlear implantation for patients with common cavity deformity (CCD) can be difficult, with a higher incidence of intra- and postoperative complications; outcomes with CCD patients are also highly variable. In this study, surgical time was compared between the traditional facial recess approach (TFRA) and the transmastoid slotted labyrinthotomy approach (TSLA). Audiological outcomes and the benefit of using customized electrode arrays for CCD patients are also discussed. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review of 13 cochlear implant (CI) patients with CCD. METHODS: Six patients were implanted with the TFRA using traditional electrodes, and seven patients were implanted with the TSLA using customized electrodes. Intra- and postoperative complications were reviewed. Audiological outcomes were measured 3 months to 2 years after CI activation. RESULTS: The mean surgical time for TSLA group was nearly half as long as for the TRFA group (P < .05). Although mean audiological outcomes were better for the TSLA group, there was no significant difference between groups (P > .05). CONCLUSIONS: For CCD patients, TSLA for cochlear implantation is recommended due to shortened surgical time; customized electrode arrays may be additionally advantageous in terms of audiological outcomes. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4. Laryngoscope, 128:468-472, 2018.

7 Article Characteristics of Mandarin Open-set Word Recognition Development among Chinese Children with Cochlear Implants. 2017

Kong, Ying / Liu, Xin / Liu, Sha / Li, Yong-Xin. ·Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Institute of Otolaryngology, Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Capital Medical University, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100005, China. · China Rehabilitation Research Center for Hearing and Speech Impairment, Beijing 100029, China. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Capital Medical University, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100730, China. ·Chin Med J (Engl) · Pubmed #29052560.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cochlear implants (CIs) can improve speech recognition for children with severe congenital hearing loss, and open-set word recognition is an important efficacy measure. This study examined Mandarin open-set word recognition development among Chinese children with CIs and normal hearing (NH). METHODS: This study included 457 children with CIs and 131 children with NH, who completed the Mandarin lexical neighborhood test. The results for children at 1-8 years after receiving their CIs were compared to those from the children with NH using linear regression analysis and analysis of variance. RESULTS: Recognition of disyllabic easy words, disyllabic hard words, monosyllabic easy words, and monosyllabic hard words increased with time after CI implantation. Scores for cases with implantation before 3 years old were significantly better than those for implantation after 3 years old. There were significant differences in open-set word recognition between the CI and NH groups. For implantation before 2 years, there was no significant difference in recognition at the ages of 6-7 years, compared to 3-year-old children with NH, or at the age of 10 years, compared to 6-year-old children with NH. For implantation before 3 years, there was no significant difference in recognition at the ages of 8-9 years, compared to 3-year-old children with NH, or at the age of 10 years, compared to 6-year-old children with NH. For implantation after 3 years, there was a significant difference in recognition at the age of 13 years, compared to 3-year-old children with NH. CONCLUSIONS: Mandarin open-set word recognition increased with time after CI implantation, and the age at implantation had a significant effect on long-term speech recognition. Chinese children with CIs had delayed but similar development of recognition, compared to normal children. Early CI implantation can shorten the gap between children with CIs and normal children.

8 Article Validation of list equivalency for Mandarin speech materials to use with cochlear implant listeners. 2017

Li, Yongxin / Wang, Shuncheng / Su, Qiaodang / Galvin, John J / Fu, Qian-Jie. ·a Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery , Beijing TongRen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Ministry of Education of China , Beijing , P. R. China and. · b Department of Head and Neck Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine , UCLA , Los Angeles , CA , USA. ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #27414242.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Speech materials validated with normal-hearing listeners may not be appropriate for clinical assessment of cochlear implant (CI) users. The aim of this study was to validate list equivalency of the Mandarin Speech Perception (MSP) sentences, disyllables, and monosyllables in Mandarin-speaking CI patients. DESIGN: Recognition of MSP sentences, disyllables, and monosyllables each were measured for all 10 lists. STUDY SAMPLE: 67 adult and 32 pediatric Mandarin-speaking CI users. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between adult and pediatric subject groups for all test materials. Significant differences were observed among lists within each test. After removing one or two lists within each test, no significant differences were observed among the remaining lists. While there was equal variance among lists within a given test, the variance was larger for children than for adults, and increased from monosyllables to disyllables to sentences. CONCLUSIONS: Some adjustment to test lists previously validated with CI simulations was needed to create perceptually equivalent lists for real CI users, suggesting that test materials should be validated in the targeted population. Differences in mean scores and variance across test materials suggest that CI users may differ in their ability to make use of contextual cues available in sentences and disyllables.

9 Article Electrically evoked compound action potentials are different depending on the site of cochlear stimulation. 2016

van de Heyning, Paul / Arauz, Santiago L / Atlas, Marcus / Baumgartner, Wolf-Dieter / Caversaccio, Marco / Chester-Browne, Ronel / Estienne, Patricia / Gavilan, Javier / Godey, Benoit / Gstöttner, Wolfgang / Han, Demin / Hagen, Rudolph / Kompis, Martin / Kuzovkov, Vlad / Lassaletta, Luis / Lefevre, Franc / Li, Yongxin / Müller, Joachim / Parnes, Lorne / Kleine Punte, Andrea / Raine, Christopher / Rajan, Gunesh / Rivas, Adriana / Rivas, José Antonio / Royle, Nicola / Sprinzl, Georg / Stephan, Kurt / Walkowiak, Adam / Yanov, Yuri / Zimmermann, Kim / Zorowka, Patrick / Skarzynski, Henryk. ·a Antwerp University Hospital , Antwerp , Belgium. · b Instituto de ORL , Buenos Aires , Argentina. · c Ear Science Centre, School of Surgery , The University of Western Australia , Nedlands , Australia. · d Ear Science Institute Australia Implant Centre , Subiaco , Australia. · e Medizinische Universität Wien, Universitätsklinik für Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenkrankheiten , Vienna , Austria. · f Universitätsklinik für HNO, Kopf- und Halschirurgie, Inselspital Bern , Bern , Switzerland. · g Hospital Universitario La Paz, Institute for Health Research (IdiPAZ) , Madrid , Spain. · h Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Rennes , Rennes , France. · i Capital Medical University, Beijing Tongren Hospital , Beijing , China. · j Klinik und Poliklinik für Hals-, Nasen und Ohren- Krankheiten , Universität Würzburg , Würzburg , Germany. · k St. Petersburg ENT and Speech Research Institute , St. Petersburg , Russia. · l Klinik und Poliklinik für Hals-Nasen-Ohrenheilkunde , Klinikum der Universität München , München , Germany. · m London Health Sciences Centre , London , Canada. · n Bradford Royal Infirmary , Bradford , United Kingdom. · o Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery Unit, School of Surgery , University of Western Australia, Fremantle Hospital , Fremantle , Australia. · p Clinica Rivas, Centro Medico Otologico , Bogota , Colombia. · q Universitätsklinik für Hals- Nasen- Ohrenheilkunde Innsbruck , Innsbruck , Austria. · r Universitätsklinik für Hör-, Stimm- und Sprachstörungen Innsbruck , Innsbruck , Austria. · s Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing , Warsaw , Poland. · t World Hearing Center , Nadarzyn , Poland. · u Institute of Sensory Organs , Nadarzyn , Poland. ·Cochlear Implants Int · Pubmed #27900916.

ABSTRACT: One of the many parameters that can affect cochlear implant (CI) users' performance is the site of presentation of electrical stimulation, from the CI, to the auditory nerve. Evoked compound action potential (ECAP) measurements are commonly used to verify nerve function by stimulating one electrode contact in the cochlea and recording the resulting action potentials on the other contacts of the electrode array. The present study aimed to determine if the ECAP amplitude differs between the apical, middle, and basal region of the cochlea, if double peak potentials were more likely in the apex than the basal region of the cochlea, and if there were differences in the ECAP threshold and recovery function across the cochlea. ECAP measurements were performed in the apical, middle, and basal region of the cochlea at fixed sites of stimulation with varying recording electrodes. One hundred and forty one adult subjects with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss fitted with a Standard or FLEX

10 Article [Analyses of clinical features and efficacy of sudden deafness with vertigo and dizziness]. 2015

Liu, Bo / Han, Demin / Zhang, Yi / Li, Yongxin / Gong, Shusheng / Chen, Xiuwu / Meng, Xixi / Tang, Junxiang / Xiang, Jie / Jiang, Xuejun / Yang, Ning / Tian, Ying / Hui, Lian / Feng, Shuai / Anonymous8460852. ·Center of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100730, China. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, The First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, China; Email: handm@trhos.com. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, The First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, China; Email: djiangxj@163.com. ·Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi · Pubmed #26695796.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical characteristics and the effect of drug treatment for sudden hearing loss with vertigo or dizziness. METHODS: In a prospective, randomized, single blinded randomized multicenter clinical study, patients with sudden deafness, ranging in age from 18 to 65 years old, with a duration less than 2 weeks, and with no any medical treatments were collected. In accordance with the hearing curve, those patients were divided into four types, i.e., low and intermediate frequency descent type; high frequency descent type; fall flat type; and total deafness type. Each type was treated by four different treatment options, according to the unified design of the random table, and randomly selected one of the options for treatment. The efficacy of the patients with sudden deafness with vertigo and dizziness was analyzed statistically after the follow-up for 4 weeks. SPSS 13.0 software was used to analyze the data. RESULTS: In August 2007 to October 2011, 33 hospitals in the country included 1 024 patients with sudden deafness in line with the inclusion criteria, of whom 296 (28.91%) were accompanied by vertigo/dizziness symptoms, 126 were males and 170 were females, with an average age of (41.2 ± 13.5) years old. types of the different audiometric curves of sudden deafness, the occurrence of complete deafness with vertigo/dizziness was the highest (44.93%), followed by flat down type (25.87%), high frequency descent type (21.28%) and low intermediate frequency descent type (18.54%). After the standard treatment, the vertigo and dizziness symptoms of the sudden deafness patients could disappear, and the hearing in each group was obviously improved. The hearing curative effect on patients accompanied by vertigo/dizziness of low frequency and intermediate frequency descent type was the best, and the total efficiency can reach up to 94.74%, with the cure rate of 68.42%; followed by flat type, in which the total effective rate was 80.76%, with the recovery rate of 22.12%; and the effects on patients in high frequency descent type and total deafness type effect were relatively poor, in which the total effective rates were 70.00% (recovery rate of 10.00%) and 65.32% (recovery rate of 5.65%), respectively. The total effective rate of patients with sudden deafness associated with halo had no statistical significance (P > 0.05), in comparison to that of patients without halo; but, the cure rate of patients with no vertigo/dizziness of total deafness and the high frequency decreased patients with sudden deafness was significantly higher than that of vertigo/dizziness patients, with a statistical difference (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The patients with sudden deafness in each type have a certain proportion of vertigo/dizziness, especially the deaf type. The possibility of hearing complete recovery in patients with vertigo/dizziness was significantly lower than that without vertigo/dizziness.

11 Article The development of auditory skills in young children with Mondini dysplasia after cochlear implantation. 2014

Chen, Xueqing / Yan, Fei / Liu, Bo / Liu, Sha / Kong, Ying / Zheng, Jun / Li, Yongxin / Gong, Shusheng / Han, Demin / Zhang, Luo. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital and Beijing Institute of Otolaryngology, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. · Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #25247792.

ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to survey and compare the development of auditory skills in young children with Mondini dysplasia and profoundly-deaf young children with radiologically normal inner ears over a period of 3 years after cochlear implantation. A total of 545 young children (age 7 to 36 months) with prelingual, severe to profound hearing loss participated in this study. All children received cochlear implantation. Based on whether or not there was a Mondini dysplasia as diagnosed with CT scanning, the subjects were divided into 2 groups: (A) 514 young children with radiologically normal inner ears and (B) 31 young children with Mondini dysplasia. The Infant-Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS) was used to assess the children's auditory skills that include vocalization changes, spontaneous alerting to sounds in everyday living environments, and the ability to derive meaning from sounds. The assessment was performed prior to surgery and at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, and 36 months after implant device switch-on. The mean scores for overall auditory skills were not significantly different between groups A and B at pre-surgery, 1, 12, 24, and 36 months post-surgery, but were significantly different at 3, 6, and 9 months post-surgery. The mean scores for all auditory skills in children with Mondini dysplasia showed significant improvement over time. The mean scores for the three subcategories of auditory skills in children with Mondini dysplasia also showed significant differences at pre-surgery, 1, 3, 6, and 9 months, however, there were no significant differences at 12, 24, and 36 months. Overall, the auditory skills of young children with Mondini dysplasia developed rapidly after cochlear implantation, in a similar manner to that of young children with radiologically normal inner ears. Cochlear implantation is an effective intervention for young children with Mondini dysplasia.

12 Article Effect of age at cochlear implantation on auditory and speech development of children with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder. 2014

Liu, Yuying / Dong, Ruijuan / Li, Yuling / Xu, Tianqiu / Li, Yongxin / Chen, Xueqing / Gong, Shusheng. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100730, China. · Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (Capital Medical University), Ministry of Education, Beijing Institute of Otolaryngology, Beijing 100005, China. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100730, China; Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (Capital Medical University), Ministry of Education, Beijing Institute of Otolaryngology, Beijing 100005, China. Electronic address: xueqingchen2006@aliyun.com. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100730, China. Electronic address: gongss1962@163.com. ·Auris Nasus Larynx · Pubmed #25194855.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the auditory and speech abilities in children with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) after cochlear implantation (CI) and determine the role of age at implantation. METHODS: Ten children participated in this retrospective case series study. All children had evidence of ANSD. All subjects had no cochlear nerve deficiency on magnetic resonance imaging and had used the cochlear implants for a period of 12-84 months. We divided our children into two groups: children who underwent implantation before 24 months of age and children who underwent implantation after 24 months of age. Their auditory and speech abilities were evaluated using the following: behavioral audiometry, the Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP), the Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (MAIS), the Infant-Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS), the Standard-Chinese version of the Monosyllabic Lexical Neighborhood Test (LNT), the Multisyllabic Lexical Neighborhood Test (MLNT), the Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) and the Meaningful Use of Speech Scale (MUSS). RESULTS: All children showed progress in their auditory and language abilities. The 4-frequency average hearing level (HL) (500Hz, 1000Hz, 2000Hz and 4000Hz) of aided hearing thresholds ranged from 17.5 to 57.5dB HL. All children developed time-related auditory perception and speech skills. Scores of children with ANSD who received cochlear implants before 24 months tended to be better than those of children who received cochlear implants after 24 months. Seven children completed the Mandarin Lexical Neighborhood Test. Approximately half of the children showed improved open-set speech recognition. CONCLUSION: Cochlear implantation is helpful for children with ANSD and may be a good optional treatment for many ANSD children. In addition, children with ANSD fitted with cochlear implants before 24 months tended to acquire auditory and speech skills better than children fitted with cochlear implants after 24 months.

13 Article [Cochlear implant performance evaluation with cortical auditory evoked potential in a group of post-lingually deaf adults]. 2013

Kan, Cheng / Liu, Hui / Fu, Xinring / Chen, Xueqing / Wang, Shuo / Mo, Lingyan / Zheng, Jun / Li, Yongxin / Gong, Shusheng / Han, Demin. ·Beijing Tong Ren Hospital, Capital Medical University Beijing Institute of Otolaryngology. ·Lin Chung Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi · Pubmed #24417165.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the law of auditory remodeling by studying the Cortical Auditory Evoked Potential in a group of post-lingually deaf adults in the early stage of the cochlear implant use. METHOD: Ten post-lingually deaf adults implanted with PULSAR ci 100 of Medel device ranged from 19 to 52 years old with duration of deafness from 3 months to 23 years.were involved. Their P1-N1-P2 responses to /ba/ at around 60-70 dB SPi and open-set speech recognition scores of mono-syllabic words were recorded at 1. 3 and 6 months after the switch-on of cochlear implants. RESULT: Six out of 10 typical waveforms of Pl-N1-P2 were obtained. The other I were with atypical waveforms. The group with atypical waveform was characterized by long duration and early onset of deafness. There was no significant difference regarding either the amplitude or the latency of each peak at the 3 data collection time points. There was significant difference among the 3 data collection time points about the speech recognition scores with the highest score at the 6th month of switch on. There was no significant correlation between the peak of the CAEP and speech recognition score. CONCLUSION: In the first 6 months of cochlear implant use in the post-lingually deaf adults, the duration and the onset age of deafness played important role in respect of the presence and waveform morphology of the CAEPs. It needs at least 6 months for the central auditory system to make use of the audio input from the cochlear implant.

14 Article [Effectiveness of cochlear implantation in children with auditory neuropathy and cochlear nerve aplasia]. 2013

Huang, Li-hui / Zhang, Yan-mei / Zhang, Jing-ping / Chen, Xue-qing / Mo, Ling-yan / Liu, Hui / Liu, Bo / Li, Yong-xin / Gong, Shu-sheng / Han, De-min. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Institute of Otolaryngology, Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100005, China. ·Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi · Pubmed #24195820.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to assess of cochlear implantation in children with auditory neuropathy and cochlear nerve aplasia by using Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) and Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR). METHODS: Twenty one children with cochlear implants participated in this study. They all received cochlear implant surgery at our hospital from January 2004 to October 2010. All children had hearing aid trial and hearing and speech rehabilitation before surgery at least three months.Nine children (7 male, 2 female) were diagnosed with auditory neuropathy, twelve (7 male, 5 female) with cochlear nerve aplasia. Twenty children (10 male, 10 female) with sensorineural hearing loss served as a control group. All the children received cochlear implant for more than six months. Forty two children with normal hearing served as another control group which were divided into three subgroups according to their age.Group A included 18 children aged under two yrs, group B consisted of 16 children aged from two to four yrs and group C comprised eight children aged above four yrs. CAP and SIR were used to evaluate among all the children and the scores were compared. RESULTS: The CAP scores of children with auditory neuropathy, cochlear nerve aplasia, sensorial neural hearing loss and the three subgroups children with normal hearing were 4.44 ± 1.50, 4.83 ± 1.69, 4.55 ± 1.66, 5.22 ± 1.11, 6.75 ± 0.45 and 7.00 ± 0.00 respectively, and SIR scores were 2.66 ± 1.11, 2.33 ± 1.15, 2.40 ± 0.75, 2.56 ± 1.04, 4.12 ± 0.81 and 5.00 ± 0.00 respectively. There were significant differences among the six groups for CAP scores(χ(2) = 35.481, P < 0.001) and SIR scores(χ(2) = 40.549, P < 0.001).No significant differences for CAP and SIR scores were observed between children with auditory neuropathy/cochlear nerve aplasia and sensorial neural hearing loss as well as group A (P > 0.05 for each), and there were significant differences were shown between children with auditory neuropathy/cochlear nerve aplasia and group B as well as group C (P < 0.01 for each aplasia). CONCLUSIONS: The auditory and speech capabilities of children with auditory neuropathy and cochlear nerve deficiency can can get benefits from cochlear implants as children with sensorineural hearing loss, however not achieve the level of those with normal hearing after cochlear implantation. The long term effects still need follow-up and evaluation.

15 Article Cochlear implants with fine structure processing improve speech and tone perception in Mandarin-speaking adults. 2013

Chen, Xueqing / Liu, Bo / Liu, Sha / Mo, Lingyan / Li, Yuling / Kong, Ying / Zheng, Jun / Li, Yongxin / Gong, Shusheng / Han, Demin. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. ·Acta Otolaryngol · Pubmed #23768059.

ABSTRACT: CONCLUSION: This study indicates that Mandarin-speaking subjects acquire significant benefit from a cochlear implant (CI) and audio processor with the fine structure processing (FSP) coding strategy. It can take adult Mandarin CI users time to become accustomed to their CI and appreciate the benefits. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine speech perception outcomes in Mandarin-speaking adults who received the FSP coding strategy. METHODS: This was a prospective study. Ten adults who were implanted unilaterally with a PULSARCI(100), and received an OPUS 1 or OPUS 2 speech processor, were included in this study. The mean age at implantation was 31.1 years. We determined the benefit to postlingually deafened Mandarin-speaking adults with a severe to profound hearing loss using the tests: monosyllables in quiet, sentences in quiet and the Mandarin Hearing in Noise Test (MHINT). Tone perception was evaluated using a tone perception test. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to score sound quality and ease of listening. RESULTS: The results showed a significant improvement between first fitting and 6 months in all speech tests and in tone perception. The VAS scores showed a significant improvement over 6 months in sound quality and an immediate benefit in ease of listening.

16 Article Speech recognition and acoustic features in combined electric and acoustic stimulation. 2012

Yoon, Yang-soo / Li, Yongxin / Fu, Qian-Jie. ·House Ear Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA. ·J Speech Lang Hear Res · Pubmed #22199183.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: In this study, the authors aimed to identify speech information processed by a hearing aid (HA) that is additive to information processed by a cochlear implant (CI) as a function of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). METHOD: Speech recognition was measured with CI alone, HA alone, and CI + HA. Ten participants were separated into 2 groups; good (aided pure-tone average [PTA] < 55 dB) and poor (aided PTA ≥ 55 dB) at audiometric frequencies ≤ 1 kHz in HA. RESULTS: Results showed that the good-aided PTA group derived a clear bimodal benefit (performance difference between CI + HA and CI alone) for vowel and sentence recognition in noise, whereas the poor-aided PTA group received little benefit across speech tests and SNRs. Results also showed that a better aided PTA helped in processing cues embedded in both low and high frequencies; none of these cues was significantly perceived by the poor-aided PTA group. CONCLUSIONS: The aided PTA is an important indicator for bimodal advantage in speech perception. The lack of bimodal benefits in the poor group may be attributed to the nonoptimal HA fitting. Bimodal listening provides a synergistic effect for cues in both low- and high-frequency components in speech.

17 Article The relationship between binaural benefit and difference in unilateral speech recognition performance for bilateral cochlear implant users. 2011

Yoon, Yang-Soo / Li, Yongxin / Kang, Hou-Yong / Fu, Qian-Jie. ·Communication and Neuroscience Division, House Ear Institute, 2100 West Third Street, Los Angeles, CA 90057, USA. ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #21696329.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The full benefit of bilateral cochlear implants may depend on the unilateral performance with each device, the speech materials, processing ability of the user, and/or the listening environment. In this study, bilateral and unilateral speech performances were evaluated in terms of recognition of phonemes and sentences presented in quiet or in noise. DESIGN: Speech recognition was measured for unilateral left, unilateral right, and bilateral listening conditions; speech and noise were presented at 0° azimuth. The 'binaural benefit' was defined as the difference between bilateral performance and unilateral performance with the better ear. STUDY SAMPLE: Nine adults with bilateral cochlear implants participated. RESULTS: On average, results showed a greater binaural benefit in noise than in quiet for all speech tests. More importantly, the binaural benefit was greater when unilateral performance was similar across ears. As the difference in unilateral performance between ears increased, the binaural advantage decreased; this functional relationship was observed across the different speech materials and noise levels even though there was substantial intra- and inter-subject variability. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that subjects who show symmetry in speech recognition performance between implanted ears in general show a large binaural benefit.

18 Article The development of auditory skills in infants with isolated Large Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome after cochlear implantation. 2011

Chen, Xueqing / Liu, Bo / Liu, Sha / Mo, Lingyan / Liu, Haihong / Dong, Ruijuan / Li, Yongxin / Gong, Shusheng / Han, Demin / Zhang, Luo. ·Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery (Ministry of Education), Beijing Institute of Otolaryngology, Beijing 100005, China. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #21592591.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the auditory performance of infants with isolated Large Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome (LVAS) after cochlear implantation, compare their performance with those of infants with a normal inner ear, and establish a database of auditory development. METHOD: 435 infants with congenital severe to profound hearing loss participated in this study. 62 infants in group A were diagnosed with isolated LVAS. 373 infants in group B had a normal inner ear. Infant-Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS) was used to evaluate the development of auditory skills. RESULTS: The mean scores for auditory ability showed no significant difference between groups A and B. The mean scores for the three different auditory skills increased significantly over time. The differences were statistically significant in mean scores among the three different auditory skills for group B. CONCLUSION: Auditory skills of infants with isolated LVAS developed rapidly after cochlear implantation, in a similar manner to those of infants with a normal inner ear. Cochlear implantation is an effective interventional approach and an established therapeutic option for infants with isolated LVAS.

19 Article Tone perception and production in pediatric cochlear implants users. 2011

Xu, Li / Chen, Xiuwu / Lu, Hongyun / Zhou, Ning / Wang, Shuo / Liu, Qiaoyun / Li, Yongxin / Zhao, Xiaoyan / Han, Demin. ·School of Rehabilitation and Communication Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, 45701, USA. XuL@ohio.edu ·Acta Otolaryngol · Pubmed #21171835.

ABSTRACT: CONCLUSIONS: In prelingually deaf children with cochlear implants, tone perception and production performance are highly correlated. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that tone perception is the prerequisite for good tone production. OBJECTIVES: Previous research has shown remarkable deficits in tone perception and production in native tone language-speaking, prelingually deafened children with cochlear implants. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between tone perception and production in those children. METHODS: Twenty-five prelingually deaf children with cochlear implants participated in the study. All subjects were Advanced Bionics CII/90K users with various lengths of implant use. To evaluate tone perception performance, subjects completed a computerized tone contrast test. For tone production performance, an artificial neural network was used to evaluate the accuracy of tones recorded from each of the 25 subjects. RESULTS: Large individual differences in tone perception and production performance were observed in these subjects. Tone perception accuracy ranged from 50.0 to 96.9% correct (chance performance = 50% correct; mean = 71.0% correct). Tone production performance ranged from 19.4 to 97.2% correct (mean = 52.0% correct). A strong correlation was found between tone perception and production performance in this group of subjects (r = 0.805).

20 Article Vocal singing by prelingually-deafened children with cochlear implants. 2009

Xu, Li / Zhou, Ning / Chen, Xiuwu / Li, Yongxin / Schultz, Heather M / Zhao, Xiaoyan / Han, Demin. ·School of Hearing, Speech and Language Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701, USA. xul@ohio.edu ·Hear Res · Pubmed #19560528.

ABSTRACT: The coarse pitch information in cochlear implants might hinder the development of singing in prelingually-deafened pediatric users. In the present study, seven prelingually-deafened children with cochlear implants (5.4-12.3 years old) sang one song that was the most familiar to him or her. The control group consisted of 14 normal-hearing children (4.1-8.0 years old). The fundamental frequencies (F0) of each note in the recorded songs were extracted. The following five metrics were computed based on the reference music scores: (1) F0 contour direction of the adjacent notes, (2) F0 compression ratio of the entire song, (3) mean deviation of the normalized F0 across the notes, (4) mean deviation of the pitch intervals, and (5) standard deviation of the note duration differences. Children with cochlear implants showed significantly poorer performance in the pitch-based assessments than the normal-hearing children. No significant differences were seen between the two groups in the rhythm-based measure. Prelingually-deafened children with cochlear implants have significant deficits in singing due to their inability to manipulate pitch in the correct directions and to produce accurate pitch height. Future studies with a large sample size are warranted in order to account for the large variability in singing performance.