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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by M. Samantha Lewis
Based on 8 articles published since 2009
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, M. S. Lewis wrote the following 8 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Hearing complaints among veterans following traumatic brain injury. 2017

Gallun, Frederick J / Papesh, Melissa A / Lewis, M Samantha. ·a VA RR&D National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, VA Portland Health Care System , Portland , OR , USA. · b Department of Otolaryngology/H&NS , Oregon Health and Science University , Portland , OR , USA. · c Neuroscience Graduate Program , Oregon Health and Science University , Portland , OR , USA. ·Brain Inj · Pubmed #28981349.

ABSTRACT: It has been shown that there is an increased risk for impaired auditory function following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Veterans. Evidence is strongest in the area of self-report, but behavioural and electrophysiological data have been obtained that are consistent with these complaints. Peripheral and central dysfunction have both been observed. Historically, studies have focused on penetrating head injuries where central injury is more easily documented than in mild closed head injuries, but several recent reports have expanded the literature to include closed head injuries as well. The lack of imaging technology that can identify which closed head injuries are likely to impact auditory function is a significant barrier to accurate diagnosis and rehabilitation. Current behavioural and electrophysiological measures are effective in substantiating the auditory complaints of these patients but leave many questions unanswered. One significant limitation of current approaches is the lack of clear data regarding the potential influence of those mental health comorbidities that are very likely to be present in the Veteran population. In the area of rehabilitation, there are indications that hearing aids and other assistive listening devices may provide benefit, as can auditory training programmes, yet more research needs to be done.

2 Review Hearing impairment and tinnitus: prevalence, risk factors, and outcomes in US service members and veterans deployed to the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. 2015

Theodoroff, Sarah M / Lewis, M Samantha / Folmer, Robert L / Henry, James A / Carlson, Kathleen F. · ·Epidemiol Rev · Pubmed #25600417.

ABSTRACT: Hearing loss and tinnitus are the 2 most prevalent service-connected disabilities among veterans in the United States. Veterans of Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn have been exposed to multiple hazards associated with these conditions, such as blasts/explosions, ototoxic chemicals, and most notably high levels of noise. We conducted a systematic literature review of evidence on 1) prevalence of, 2) risk and protective factors for, and 3) functional and quality-of-life outcomes of hearing impairment and tinnitus in US Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn veterans and military personnel. We identified studies published from 2001 through 2013 using PubMed, PsycINFO, REHABDATA, Cochrane Library, pearling, and expert recommendation. Peer-reviewed English language articles describing studies of 30 or more adults were included if they informed one or more key questions. A total of 839 titles/abstracts were reviewed for relevance by investigators trained in critical analysis of literature; 14 studies met inclusion criteria. Of these, 13 studies presented data on prevalence and 4 on risk/protective factors, respectively. There were no included studies reporting on outcomes. Findings from this systematic review will help inform clinicians, researchers, and policy makers on future resource and research needs pertaining to hearing impairment and tinnitus in this newest generation of veterans.

3 Article Description, Normative Data, and Utility of the Hearing Aid Skills and Knowledge Test. 2018

Saunders, Gabrielle H / Morse-Fortier, Charlotte / McDermott, Daniel J / Vachhani, Jay J / Grush, Leslie D / Griest, Susan / Lewis, M Samantha. ·VA Rehabilitation Research and Development National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, OR. · Department of Otolaryngology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR. ·J Am Acad Audiol · Pubmed #29488873.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The ability to manage hearing aids is crucial for successful outcomes and for maintaining hearing aid use. It is therefore important to have a tool that can effectively identify which hearing aid management skills are lacking so that the audiologist can provide additional education and training on that skill. Such a tool can also provide useful quantitative data for researchers. PURPOSE: To collect normative data (Experiment 1) and assess inter- and intrarater reliability (Experiment 2) for a hearing aid management assessment tool known as the Hearing Aid Skills and Knowledge (HASK) test. STUDY SAMPLE: Two hundred thirty-six new hearing aid users recruited from the VA Portland Health Care System and 126 experienced hearing aid users recruited from the local Portland community participated in Experiment 1. The veteran participants were taking part in a larger hearing aid study, and the community participants were recruited at community events that took place around Portland, OR. Three clinical audiologists and two AuD students completing their fourth year externship participated in Experiment 2. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: In Experiment 1, HASK data were collected from the new hearing aid users at 4-8 wk and 6-8 mo after the fitting of their first pair of hearing aids, and from experienced users on a single occasion. In addition, self-reported hearing aid use, benefit, and satisfaction were assessed for all participants. The audiologists/students in Experiment 2 watched and independently scored videos of six individuals completing the HASK. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) across audiologists were computed for HASK scores. Three audiologists/students rated at least one video on two occasions to provide interrater reliability data. RESULTS: Mean performance on the HASK was about 70% for knowledge and 80% for skills for both the new and experienced hearing aid users. Performance did not change among the new users between the 4-8 wk and 6-8 mo administration. The specific skills lacking were associated with advanced management abilities (cleaning and troubleshooting). Experiment 2 revealed ICCs for inter- and intrarater reliability for HASK to range from 0.76 to 0.94, showing acceptable to excellent reliability. CONCLUSIONS: The HASK is a quick and easy test with good-to-excellent inter- and intrarater reliability. It can effectively identify which hearing aid management skills are lacking so that the audiologist can provide additional education and training on those skills. Data show performance is ∼70% for knowledge and 80% for skills and this does not change with hearing aid experience. The significant positive correlations between HASK scores and hearing aid use and satisfaction highlight the notion that ability to manage hearing aids successfully is integral to good hearing aid outcome.

4 Article Audiologic characteristics in a sample of recently-separated military Veterans: The Noise Outcomes in Servicemembers Epidemiology Study (NOISE Study). 2017

Gordon, J S / Griest, S E / Thielman, E J / Carlson, K F / Helt, W J / Lewis, M S / Blankenship, C / Austin, D / Theodoroff, S M / Henry, J A. ·VA RR&D, National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research (NCRAR), Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, Portland, OR, United States. Electronic address: jane.gordon@va.gov. · VA RR&D, National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research (NCRAR), Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, Portland, OR, United States; Oregon Health & Science University, Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery, Portland, OR, United States. · VA RR&D, National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research (NCRAR), Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, Portland, OR, United States. · VA RR&D, National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research (NCRAR), Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, Portland, OR, United States; Oregon Health & Science University, School of Public Health, Portland, OR, United States; Center to Improve Veteran Involvement in Care (CIVIC), Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, Portland, OR, United States. · VA RR&D, National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research (NCRAR), Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, Portland, OR, United States; Oregon Health & Science University, School of Public Health, Portland, OR, United States. ·Hear Res · Pubmed #27913314.

ABSTRACT: Military Service Members are often exposed to high levels of occupational noise, solvents, and other exposures that can be damaging to the auditory system. Little is known about hearing loss and how it progresses in Veterans following military service. This epidemiology study is designed to evaluate and monitor a cohort of Veterans for 20 years or more to determine how hearing loss changes over time and how those changes are related to noise exposure and other ototoxic exposures encountered during military service. Data reported here are from baseline assessments of the first 100 study participants (84 males; 16 females; mean age 33.5 years; SD 8.8; range 21-58). Each participant was asked to complete a comprehensive audiologic examination and self-report questionnaires regarding sociodemographic characteristics, noise and solvent exposures, health conditions common among post-deployment Veterans, and the social and emotional consequences of hearing loss. For this relatively young cohort, 29% exhibited hearing loss, defined as average hearing threshold >20 dB HL in the conventional audiometric range. Forty-two percent exhibited hearing loss in the extended-high-frequency audiometric range using the same criterion (average hearing threshold >20 dB HL). Certain factors were found to be associated with poorer hearing in both conventional and extended-high-frequency ranges, including age, type of military branch, years of military service, number of military deployments, noise exposure, tinnitus, and a positive screen for post-traumatic stress disorder. Although the majority of participants had hearing within normal limits, 27% reported a self-perceived mild/moderate hearing handicap and 14% reported a significant handicap. Further research is needed to identify a cause for this discrepancy in audiologic results versus self-report. The information obtained from this longitudinal study could be used in future resource planning with the goal of preventing, as much as possible, the development of hearing loss during military service, and the exacerbation of prevalent hearing loss after military service and over Veterans' lifetimes.

5 Article Tinnitus Screener: Results From the First 100 Participants in an Epidemiology Study. 2016

Henry, James A / Griest, Susan / Austin, Don / Helt, Wendy / Gordon, Jane / Thielman, Emily / Theodoroff, Sarah M / Lewis, M Samantha / Blankenship, Cody / Zaugg, Tara L / Carlson, Kathleen. · ·Am J Audiol · Pubmed #27315442.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: In the Noise Outcomes in Servicemembers Epidemiology Study, Veterans recently separated from the military undergo comprehensive assessments to initiate long-term monitoring of their auditory function. We developed the Tinnitus Screener, a four-item algorithmic instrument that determines whether tinnitus is present and, if so, whether it is constant or intermittent, or whether only temporary tinnitus has been experienced. Predictive validity data are presented for the first 100 Noise Outcomes in Servicemembers Epidemiology Study participants. METHOD: The Tinnitus Screener was administered to participants by telephone. In lieu of a gold standard for determining tinnitus presence, the predictive validity of the tinnitus category assigned to participants on the basis of the Screener results was assessed when the participants attended audiologic testing. RESULTS: Of the 100 participants, 67 screened positive for intermittent or constant tinnitus. Three were categorized as "temporary" tinnitus only, and 30 were categorized as "no tinnitus." Tinnitus categorization was predictively valid with 96 of the 100 participants. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide preliminary evidence that the Screener may be suitable for quickly determining essential parameters of reported tinnitus. We have since revised the instrument to differentiate acute from chronic tinnitus and to identify occasional tinnitus. We are also obtaining measures that will enable assessment of its test-retest reliability.

6 Article Performance on tests of central auditory processing by individuals exposed to high-intensity blasts. 2012

Gallun, Frederick J / Diedesch, Anna C / Kubli, Lina R / Walden, Therese C / Folmer, Robert L / Lewis, M Samantha / McDermott, Daniel J / Fausti, Stephen A / Leek, Marjorie R. ·1National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland, OR 97239, USA. Frederick.Gallun@va.gov ·J Rehabil Res Dev · Pubmed #23341276.

ABSTRACT: Thirty-six blast-exposed patients and twenty-nine non-blast-exposed control subjects were tested on a battery of behavioral and electrophysiological tests that have been shown to be sensitive to central auditory processing deficits. Abnormal performance among the blast-exposed patients was assessed with reference to normative values established as the mean performance on each test by the control subjects plus or minus two standard deviations. Blast-exposed patients performed abnormally at rates significantly above that which would occur by chance on three of the behavioral tests of central auditory processing: the Gaps-In-Noise, Masking Level Difference, and Staggered Spondaic Words tests. The proportion of blast-exposed patients performing abnormally on a speech-in-noise test (Quick Speech-In-Noise) was also significantly above that expected by chance. These results suggest that, for some patients, blast exposure may lead to difficulties with hearing in complex auditory environments, even when peripheral hearing sensitivity is near normal limits.

7 Article Audiometric hearing status of individuals with and without multiple sclerosis. 2010

Lewis, M Samantha / Lilly, David J / Hutter, Michele M / Bourdette, Dennis N / McMillan, Garnett P / Fitzpatrick, Mary A / Fausti, Stephen A. ·National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research (NCRAR), 3710 SW US Veterans Hospital Road, Portland VAMC, Portland, OR 97207, USA. Michele.Lewis3@med.va.gov ·J Rehabil Res Dev · Pubmed #21110263.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of the present investigation was to determine whether differences exist in audiometric hearing status between individuals with and without multiple sclerosis (MS) and between individuals with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) and individuals with secondary progressive MS (SPMS). Forty-seven subjects with MS (26 with RRMS and 21 with SPMS) and forty-nine control subjects without MS completed both a comprehensive case-history questionnaire and a conventional hearing evaluation. Statistical analyses, accounting for the potential confounding factors of age, sex, noise exposure, and use of ototoxic medications, revealed significant differences in hearing thresholds between subjects with and without MS at select audiometric test frequencies (p < 0.05). At these audiometric test frequencies, the subjects with MS had poorer hearing thresholds. Additional analyses revealed significant differences in hearing sensitivity at select audiometric frequencies between the subjects with RRMS and the subjects with SPMS, such that those with SPMS had poorer hearing thresholds. These findings have significant clinical implications for practitioners working with patients with MS.

8 Article Expectations, prefitting counseling, and hearing aid outcome. 2009

Saunders, Gabrielle H / Lewis, M Samantha / Forsline, Anna. ·National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, OR 97207, USA. Gabrielle.Saunders@va.gov ·J Am Acad Audiol · Pubmed #19585963.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Data suggest that having high expectations about hearing aids results in better overall outcome. However, some have postulated that excessively high expectations will result in disappointment and thus poor outcome. It has been suggested that counseling patients with unrealistic expectations about hearing aids prior to fitting may be beneficial. Data, however, are mixed as to the effectiveness of such counseling, in terms of both changes in expectations and final outcome. PURPOSE: The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether supplementing prefitting counseling with demonstration of real-world listening can (1) alter expectations of new hearing aid users and (2) increase satisfaction over verbal-only counseling. Secondary goals of the study were to examine (1) the relationship between prefitting expectations and postfitting outcome, and (2) the effect of hearing aid fine-tuning on hearing aid outcome. RESEARCH DESIGN: Sixty new hearing aid users were fitted binaurally with Beltone Oria behind-the-ear digital hearing aids. Forty participants received prefitting counseling and demonstration of listening situations with the Beltone AVE (Audio Verification Environment) system; 20 received prefitting counseling without a demonstration of listening situations. Hearing aid expectations were measured at initial contact and following prefitting counseling. Reported hearing aid outcome was measured after eight to ten weeks of hearing aid use. STUDY SAMPLE: Sixty new hearing aid users aged between 55 and 81 years with symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss. INTERVENTION: Participants were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups, between which the prefitting counseling and follow-up differed: Group 1 received prefitting counseling in combination with demonstration of listening situations. Additionally, if the participant had complaints about sound quality at the follow-up visit, the hearing aids were fine-tuned using the Beltone AVE system. Group 2 received prefitting counseling in combination with demonstration of listening situations with the Beltone AVE system, but no fine-tuning was provided at follow-up. Group 3 received prefitting hearing aid counseling that did not include demonstration of listening, and the hearing aids were not fine-tuned at the follow-up appointment. RESULTS: The results showed that prefitting hearing aid counseling had small but significant effects on expectations. The two forms of counseling did not differ in their effectiveness at changing expectations; however, anecdotally, we learned from many participants that that they enjoyed listening to the auditory demonstrations and that they found them to be an interesting listening exercise. The data also show that positive expectations result in more positive outcome and that hearing aid fine-tuning is beneficial to the user. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that prefitting counseling can be advantageous to hearing aid outcome and recommend the addition of prefitting counseling to address expectations associated with quality of life and self-image. The data emphasize the need to address unrealistic expectations prior to fitting hearing aids cautiously, so as not to decrease expectations to the extent of discouraging and demotivating the patient. Data also show that positive expectations regarding the impact hearing aids will have on psychosocial well-being are important for successful hearing aid outcome.