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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by David M. Kelley
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, David M. Kelley wrote the following 2 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Clinical Practice Guideline: Sudden Hearing Loss (Update). 2019

Chandrasekhar, Sujana S / Tsai Do, Betty S / Schwartz, Seth R / Bontempo, Laura J / Faucett, Erynne A / Finestone, Sandra A / Hollingsworth, Deena B / Kelley, David M / Kmucha, Steven T / Moonis, Gul / Poling, Gayla L / Roberts, J Kirk / Stachler, Robert J / Zeitler, Daniel M / Corrigan, Maureen D / Nnacheta, Lorraine C / Satterfield, Lisa. ·1 ENT & Allergy Associates, LLP, New York, New York, USA. · 2 Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra-Northwell, Hempstead, New York, USA. · 3 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. · 4 Kaiser Permanente, Walnut Creek, California, USA. · 5 Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 6 University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 7 The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada. · 8 Consumers United for Evidence-Based Healthcare, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 9 Ear, Nose & Throat Specialists of Northern Virginia, PC, Manassas, Virginia, USA. · 10 University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA. · 11 Gould Medical Group-Otolaryngology, Stockton, California, USA. · 12 Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. · 13 Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · 14 StachlerENT, West Bloomfield, Michigan, USA. · 15 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, Alexandria, Virginia, USA. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #31369359.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Sudden hearing loss is a frightening symptom that often prompts an urgent or emergent visit to a health care provider. It is frequently but not universally accompanied by tinnitus and/or vertigo. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss affects 5 to 27 per 100,000 people annually, with about 66,000 new cases per year in the United States. This guideline update provides evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of patients who present with sudden hearing loss. It focuses on sudden sensorineural hearing loss in adult patients aged ≥18 years and primarily on those with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Prompt recognition and management of sudden sensorineural hearing loss may improve hearing recovery and patient quality of life. The guideline update is intended for all clinicians who diagnose or manage adult patients who present with sudden hearing loss. PURPOSE: The purpose of this guideline update is to provide clinicians with evidence-based recommendations in evaluating patients with sudden hearing loss and sudden sensorineural hearing loss, with particular emphasis on managing idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. The guideline update group recognized that patients enter the health care system with sudden hearing loss as a nonspecific primary complaint. Therefore, the initial recommendations of this guideline update address distinguishing sensorineural hearing loss from conductive hearing loss at the time of presentation with hearing loss. They also clarify the need to identify rare, nonidiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss to help separate those patients from those with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss, who are the target population for the therapeutic interventions that make up the bulk of the guideline update. By focusing on opportunities for quality improvement, this guideline should improve diagnostic accuracy, facilitate prompt intervention, decrease variations in management, reduce unnecessary tests and imaging procedures, and improve hearing and rehabilitative outcomes for affected patients. METHODS: Consistent with the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation's "Clinical Practice Guideline Development Manual, Third Edition" (Rosenfeld et al. RESULTS: The guideline update group made DIFFERENCES FROM PRIOR GUIDELINE: Incorporation of new evidence profiles to include quality improvement opportunities, confidence in the evidence, and differences of opinion Included 10 clinical practice guidelines, 29 new systematic reviews, and 36 new randomized controlled trials Highlights the urgency of evaluation and initiation of treatment, if treatment is offered, by emphasizing the time from symptom occurrence Clarification of terminology by changing potentially unclear statements; use of the term

2 Guideline Clinical Practice Guideline: Sudden Hearing Loss (Update) Executive Summary. 2019

Chandrasekhar, Sujana S / Tsai Do, Betty S / Schwartz, Seth R / Bontempo, Laura J / Faucett, Erynne A / Finestone, Sandra A / Hollingsworth, Deena B / Kelley, David M / Kmucha, Steven T / Moonis, Gul / Poling, Gayla L / Roberts, J Kirk / Stachler, Robert J / Zeitler, Daniel M / Corrigan, Maureen D / Nnacheta, Lorraine C / Satterfield, Lisa / Monjur, Taskin M. ·1 ENT & Allergy Associates, LLP, New York, New York, USA. · 2 Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra-Northwell, Hempstead, New York, USA. · 3 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. · 4 University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA. · 5 Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 6 University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 7 The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada. · 8 Consumers United for Evidence-based Healthcare (CUE), Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 9 Ear, Nose & Throat Specialists of Northern Virginia, P.C., Manassas, Virginia, USA. · 10 Gould Medical Group-Otolaryngology, Stockton, California, USA. · 11 Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. · 12 Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · 13 StachlerENT, West Bloomfield, Michigan, USA. · 14 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, Alexandria, Virginia, USA. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #31369349.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Sudden hearing loss is a frightening symptom that often prompts an urgent or emergent visit to a health care provider. It is frequently, but not universally, accompanied by tinnitus and/or vertigo. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss affects 5 to 27 per 100,000 people annually, with about 66,000 new cases per year in the United States. This guideline update provides evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of patients who present with sudden hearing loss. It focuses on sudden sensorineural hearing loss in adult patients aged 18 and over and primarily on those with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Prompt recognition and management of sudden sensorineural hearing loss may improve hearing recovery and patient quality of life. The guideline update is intended for all clinicians who diagnose or manage adult patients who present with sudden hearing loss. PURPOSE: The purpose of this guideline update is to provide clinicians with evidence-based recommendations in evaluating patients with sudden hearing loss and sudden sensorineural hearing loss, with particular emphasis on managing idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. The guideline update group recognized that patients enter the health care system with sudden hearing loss as a nonspecific primary complaint. Therefore, the initial recommendations of this guideline update address distinguishing sensorineural hearing loss from conductive hearing loss at the time of presentation with hearing loss. They also clarify the need to identify rare, nonidiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss to help separate those patients from those with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss, who are the target population for the therapeutic interventions that make up the bulk of the guideline update. By focusing on opportunities for quality improvement, this guideline should improve diagnostic accuracy, facilitate prompt intervention, decrease variations in management, reduce unnecessary tests and imaging procedures, and improve hearing and rehabilitative outcomes for affected patients. METHODS: Consistent with the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation's RESULTS: The guideline update group made strong recommendations for the following: clinicians should distinguish sensorineural hearing loss from conductive hearing loss when a patient first presents with sudden hearing loss (KAS 1); clinicians should educate patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss about the natural history of the condition, the benefits and risks of medical interventions, and the limitations of existing evidence regarding efficacy (KAS 7); and clinicians should counsel patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss who have residual hearing loss and/or tinnitus about the possible benefits of audiological rehabilitation and other supportive measures (KAS 13). These strong recommendations were modified from the initial clinical practice guideline for clarity and timing of intervention. The guideline update group made strong recommendation against the following: clinicians should DIFFERENCES FROM PRIOR GUIDELINE: Incorporation of new evidence profiles to include quality improvement opportunities, confidence in the evidence, and differences of opinion Included 10 clinical practice guidelines, 29 new systematic reviews, and 36 new randomized controlled trials Highlights the urgency of evaluation and initiation of treatment, if treatment is offered, by emphasizing the time from symptom occurrence Clarification of terminology by changing potentially unclear statements; use of the term