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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Joel A. Goebel
Based on 9 articles published since 2010
(Why 9 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, J. A. Goebel wrote the following 9 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease. 2015

Lopez-Escamez, Jose A / Carey, John / Chung, Won-Ho / Goebel, Joel A / Magnusson, Måns / Mandalà, Marco / Newman-Toker, David E / Strupp, Michael / Suzuki, Mamoru / Trabalzini, Franco / Bisdorff, Alexandre / Anonymous1830827 / Anonymous1840827 / Anonymous1850827 / Anonymous1860827 / Anonymous1870827. ·Otology and Neurotology Group CTS495, Department of Genomic Medicine, Centre for Genomics and Oncology Research - Pfizer/Universidad de Granada/Junta de Andalucía (GENyO), PTS, Granada, Spain Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital de Poniente, El Ejido, Almeria, Spain. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univerisity School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden. · Otology and Skull Base Department, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italy. · Department of Neurology, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Neurology and German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany. · Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Neurology, Centre Hospitalier Emile Mayrisch, Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg. ·J Vestib Res · Pubmed #25882471.

ABSTRACT: This paper presents diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease jointly formulated by the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society, The Japan Society for Equilibrium Research, the European Academy of Otology and Neurotology (EAONO), the Equilibrium Committee of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) and the Korean Balance Society. The classification includes two categories: definite Menière's disease and probable Menière's disease. The diagnosis of definite Menière's disease is based on clinical criteria and requires the observation of an episodic vertigo syndrome associated with low- to medium-frequency sensorineural hearing loss and fluctuating aural symptoms (hearing, tinnitus and/or fullness) in the affected ear. Duration of vertigo episodes is limited to a period between 20 minutes and 12 hours. Probable Menière's disease is a broader concept defined by episodic vestibular symptoms (vertigo or dizziness) associated with fluctuating aural symptoms occurring in a period from 20 minutes to 24 hours.

2 Review What defines asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss? 2019

Durakovic, Nedim / Valente, Michael / Goebel, Joel A / Wick, Cameron C. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A. ·Laryngoscope · Pubmed #30408187.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Review [Diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease according to the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society]. 2017

Lopez-Escamez, J A / Carey, J / Chung, W-H / Goebel, J A / Magnusson, M / Mandalà, M / Newman-Toker, D E / Strupp, M / Suzuki, M / Trabalzini, F / Bisdorff, A. ·Otology and Neurotology Group CTS495, Department of Genomic Medicine - Centre for Genomics and Oncology Research, Pfizer/Universidad de Granada/Junta de Andalucía (GENyO), PTS Avda de la Ilustracion 114, 18016, Granada, Spanien. antonio.lopezescamez@genyo.es. · Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital de Poniente, El Ejido, Spanien. antonio.lopezescamez@genyo.es. · Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Südkorea. · Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Lund, Lund, Schweden. · Otology and Skull Base Department, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italien. · Department of Neurology, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Neurology and German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, Ludwig-Maximilians University, München, Deutschland. · Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Neurology, Centre Hospitalier Emile Mayrisch, Esch an der Alzette, Luxemburg. ·HNO · Pubmed #28770282.

ABSTRACT: This paper presents diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease jointly formulated by the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society, The Japan Society for Equilibrium Research, the European Academy of Otology and Neurotology (EAONO), the Equilibrium Committee of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) and the Korean Balance Society. The classification includes two categories: definite Menière's disease and probable Menière's disease. The diagnosis of definite Menière's disease is based on clinical criteria and requires the observation of an episodic vertigo syndrome associated with low- to medium-frequency sensorineural hearing loss and fluctuating aural symptoms (hearing, tinnitus and/or fullness) in the affected ear. Duration of vertigo episodes is limited to a period between 20 min and 12 h. Probable Menière's disease is a broader concept defined by episodic vestibular symptoms (vertigo or dizziness) associated with fluctuating aural symptoms occurring in a period from 20 min to 24 h.

4 Article A Young Man With Progressive Vision and Hearing Loss. 2016

Kung, Nathan H / Bucelli, Robert C / Van Stavern, Renee B / Goebel, Joel A / Van Stavern, Gregory P. ·Department of Neurology, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri. · Department of Ophthalmology, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri. ·JAMA Neurol · Pubmed #27213952.

ABSTRACT: A 37-year-old man with a history of progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing loss presented to a neuro-ophthalmology clinic with an acute left homonymous hemianopsia. In this article, we discuss the clinical approach and differential diagnosis of progressive combined vision and hearing loss and guide the reader to discover the patient's ultimate diagnosis.

5 Article Audiology in the sudden hearing loss clinical trial. 2012

Halpin, Chris / Shi, Helen / Reda, Domenic / Antonelli, Patrick J / Babu, Seilesh / Carey, John P / Gantz, Bruce J / Goebel, Joel A / Hammerschlag, Paul E / Harris, Jeffrey P / Isaacson, Brandon / Lee, Daniel / Linstrom, Chris J / Parnes, Lorne S / Slattery, William H / Telian, Steven A / Vrabec, Jeffrey T / Rauch, Steven. ·Department of Audiology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, USA. chris_halpin@meei.harvard.edu ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #22805100.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To report the pretreatment and posttreatment population characteristics and the overall stability of the audiologic outcomes found during the Sudden Hearing Loss Clinical Trial (ClinicalTrials.gov: Identifier NCT00097448). STUDY DESIGN: Multicenter, prospective randomized noninferiority trial of oral versus intratympanic (IT) steroid treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL). SETTING: Fifteen academically based otology practices. PATIENTS: Two hundred fifty patients with unilateral SSNHL presenting within 14 days of onset with 50 dBHL or greater pure tone average hearing threshold in the affected ear. INTERVENTION: Either 60 mg/d oral prednisone for 14 days with a 5-day taper (121 patients) or 4 IT doses for 14 days of 40 mg/ml methylprednisolone (129 patients). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Primary end point was change in hearing [dB PTA] at 2 months after treatment. Noninferiority was defined as less than 10 dB difference in hearing outcome between treatments. In this article, pretreatment and posttreatment hearing findings will be reported in detail. RESULTS: A general (and stable) effect of treatment and a specific effect of greater improvement at low frequencies were found in both treatment groups. CONCLUSION: Hearing improvements are stable, and a significantly greater improvement occurs with lower frequency after either oral or IT steroid treatment of SSNHL.

6 Article Pediatric vestibular evaluation: two children with sensorineural hearing loss. 2012

Valente, L Maureen / Goebel, Joel A / Sinks, Belinda. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA. ValenteL@wustl.edu ·J Am Acad Audiol · Pubmed #22463942.

ABSTRACT: These two cases illustrate several important areas of vestibular evaluation with children. The two case reports represent two children who display very different vestibular findings despite having significant sensorineural hearing loss. These case reports highlight that pediatric findings can differ significantly from adult findings, stressing the importance of comparing pediatric results with pediatric normative data. These two cases also highlight that vestibular techniques may successfully be adapted for use with hearing-impaired children. That is, rotary chair, computerized dynamic posturography, and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials can be adapted to use with children, including those who demonstrate significant sensorineural hearing loss. Although there is a paucity of research and clinical work in this area, some investigators (Eviatar and Eviatar, 1977; Buchman et al, 2004; Jacot et al, 2009) have reported very rapid recovery from pediatric vestibular deficits. However, it is important for audiologists to be aware that techniques may successfully be adapted for children and that many children should undergo thorough vestibular evaluation.

7 Article Atresia and sudden sensorineural hearing loss. 2012

Smith, Steven P / Milov, Simon / Goebel, Joel A. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA. smiths@ent.wustl.edu ·J Am Acad Audiol · Pubmed #22463937.

ABSTRACT: This case study summarizes findings in an adult male, aged 57, who presented to the Adult Audiology Clinic with aural atresia in the right ear resulting in a conductive hearing loss and a sudden sensorineural hearing loss in the left ear. Treatment options included reconstruction surgery in the right ear, bone anchored hearing aid in the right ear to overcome the conductive hearing loss, bone anchored hearing aid in the left ear for single sided deafness, and intratympanic steroid injections in the left ear to salvage hearing. This case study highlights that when a patient is educated on all available options the patient is then able to make a decision comfortable to him and to help improve his hearing.

8 Article Efficacy and safety of bilateral posterior canal occlusion in patients with refractory benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: case report series. 2012

Ramakrishna, Jayant / Goebel, Joel A / Parnes, Lorne S. ·Division of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #22429946.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To highlight the effectiveness, safety, and adverse effects of treating intractable posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) with bilateral posterior canal occlusions. PATIENTS: Included in this study are 6 patients diagnosed with bilateral BPPV refractory to medical treatment and particle repositioning maneuvers (PRMs) who underwent bilateral posterior semicircular canal occlusions. Patients were selected from tertiary hospital referral centers in London, Ontario, Canada, and St. Louis, Missouri, USA. INTERVENTIONS: This study used the following interventions: preoperative and postoperative audiogram testing to monitor long-term changes in hearing, computed tomography of the head to rule out central lesions and confirm normal inner ear anatomy before surgery, magnetic resonance imaging of the head as needed to rule out posterior fossa lesions causing persistent vertigo, Dix-Hallpike maneuver to diagnose BPPV, PRM and physiotherapy vestibular rehabilitation to attempt treating BPPV before surgical intervention, and sequential transmastoid posterior semicircular canal occlusion for treatment of intractable BPPV. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Postoperative resolution of vertigo induced by head movement and hearing preservation by audiometric testing and postural stability. RESULTS: All patients with severe debilitating bilateral BPPV refractory to medical treatment and PRM had complete resolution of their positional vertigo after bilateral sequential posterior semicircular canal occlusion. Hearing was preserved at the preoperative level in all but 1 patient who developed bilateral postoperative, mild, high-tone sensorineural loss. Residual postoperative adverse effects included transient imbalance in all patients and episodic, nonpositional vertigo in 1 patient. When stressed by extreme head motion, some patients had mild residual instability. There were no other significant long-term complications. CONCLUSION: Bilateral sequential posterior semicircular canal occlusion is a definitive, effective, and safe treatment modality for intractable bilateral BPPV, providing patients with resolution of their vertiginous symptoms. All 6 patients stated that the alleviation of their BPPV symptoms far out-weighed the residual motion sensitivity resulting from the occluded canals.

9 Article Oral vs intratympanic corticosteroid therapy for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss: a randomized trial. 2011

Rauch, Steven D / Halpin, Christopher F / Antonelli, Patrick J / Babu, Seilesh / Carey, John P / Gantz, Bruce J / Goebel, Joel A / Hammerschlag, Paul E / Harris, Jeffrey P / Isaacson, Brandon / Lee, Daniel / Linstrom, Christopher J / Parnes, Lorne S / Shi, Helen / Slattery, William H / Telian, Steven A / Vrabec, Jeffrey T / Reda, Domenic J. ·Department of Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 243 Charles St, Boston, MA 02114, USA. steven_rauch@meei.harvard.edu ·JAMA · Pubmed #21610239.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss has been treated with oral corticosteroids for more than 30 years. Recently, many patients' symptoms have been managed with intratympanic steroid therapy. No satisfactory comparative effectiveness study to support this practice exists. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of oral vs intratympanic steroid to treat sudden sensorineural hearing loss. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: Prospective, randomized, noninferiority trial involving 250 patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss presenting within 14 days of onset of 50 dB or higher of pure tone average (PTA) hearing threshold. The study was conducted from December 2004 through October 2009 at 16 academic community-based otology practices. Participants were followed up for 6 months. INTERVENTION: One hundred twenty-one patients received either 60 mg/d of oral prednisone for 14 days with a 5-day taper and 129 patients received 4 doses over 14 days of 40 mg/mL of methylprednisolone injected into the middle ear. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary end point was change in hearing at 2 months after treatment. Noninferiority was defined as less than a 10-dB difference in hearing outcome between treatments. RESULTS: In the oral prednisone group, PTA improved by 30.7 dB compared with a 28.7-dB improvement in the intratympanic treatment group. Mean pure tone average at 2 months was 56.0 for the oral steroid treatment group and 57.6 dB for the intratympanic treatment group. Recovery of hearing on oral treatment at 2 months by intention-to-treat analysis was 2.0 dB greater than intratympanic treatment (95.21% upper confidence interval, 6.6 dB). Per-protocol analysis confirmed the intention-to-treat result. Thus, the hypothesis of inferiority of intratympanic methylprednisolone to oral prednisone for primary treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss was rejected. CONCLUSION: Among patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss, hearing level 2 months after treatment showed that intratympanic treatment was not inferior to oral prednisone treatment. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00097448.