Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Susanna Esposito
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, S. Esposito wrote the following 4 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Should corticosteroids be used in bacterial meningitis in children? 2013

Esposito, Susanna / Semino, Margherita / Picciolli, Irene / Principi, Nicola. ·Pediatric Clinic, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Università degli Studi di Milano, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy. susanna.esposito@unimi.it ·Eur J Paediatr Neurol · Pubmed #22789668.

ABSTRACT: Bacterial meningitis is one of the most serious infections in infants and children, with considerable morbidity and mortality. Despite the spreading of conjugated vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), the most important pneumococcal serotypes and serogroup C meningococcus has reduced the incidence of this infection in developed countries, it still remains a global public health problem and an important cause of mortality and disability. Whether corticosteroids should be used as a complementary therapy to antibacterials is still not clear because of the disparate findings from clinical trials and clinical evidence. The aim of this review is to analyze the available evidence on the impact of corticosteroid therapy in infants and children with bacterial meningitis in developed countries in order to define whether they should be added routinely in the empiric therapy of such disease. Our analysis concluded that in high-income countries dexamethasone has shown good results to prevent hearing loss in Hib meningitis if administered before or at the same time as the first dose of antibiotics. Dexamethasone should be evaluated in pneumococcal meningitis: it may be less beneficial in children with delayed presentation to medical attention and may be unfavourable in case of cephalosporin-resistant pneumococci. On the contrary, there is no evidence to recommend the use of corticosteroids in meningococcal meningitis. Further studies that take into account the epidemiologic changes of recent years, consider enrolment based on the onset of symptoms and evaluate outcomes such as hearing loss and neurologic sequelae with advanced techniques are urgently needed.

2 Article Interstitial 6q25 microdeletion syndrome: ARID1B is the key gene. 2016

Ronzoni, Luisa / Tagliaferri, Francesco / Tucci, Arianna / Baccarin, Marco / Esposito, Susanna / Milani, Donatella. ·Pediatric Highly Intensive Care Unit, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Università degli Studi di Milano, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy. · Medical Genetics Laboratory, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy. ·Am J Med Genet A · Pubmed #26754677.

ABSTRACT: Interstitial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 6 are rare. Clinically, these deletions are considered to be part of a unique microdeletion syndrome associated with intellectual disability and speech impairment, typical dysmorphic features, structural anomalies of the brain, microcephaly, and non-specific multiple organ anomalies. The critical region for the interstitial 6q microdeletion phenotype was mapped to 6q24-6q25, particularly the 6q25.3 region containing the genes ARID1B and ZDHHC14. It has been hypothesized that haploinsufficiency of these genes impairs normal development of the brain and is responsible for the phenotype. This case report describes a girl presenting with typical features of 6q microdeletion syndrome, including global developmental delay, speech impairment, distinct dysmorphic features, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, common limb anomalies, and hearing loss. Chromosome analysis by array-CGH revealed a small interstitial 6q deletion spanning approximately 1.1 Mb of DNA and containing only one coding gene, ARID1B. We suggest that ARID1B is the key gene behind 6q microdeletion syndrome, and we discuss its possible role in the phenotypic manifestations.

3 Article Audiological findings, genotype and clinical severity score in Cornelia de Lange syndrome. 2014

Marchisio, Paola / Selicorni, Angelo / Bianchini, Sonia / Milani, Donatella / Baggi, Elena / Cerutti, Marta / Larizza, Lidia / Principi, Nicola / Esposito, Susanna. ·Pediatric Highly Intensive Care Unit, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Università degli Studi di Milano, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: paola.marchisio@unimi.it. · Pediatric Clinic, University of Milano Bicocca, San Gerardo Hospital, Monza, Italy. · Pediatric Highly Intensive Care Unit, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Università degli Studi di Milano, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy. · Genetic Unit, Università degli Studi di Milano, San Paolo Hospital, Milan, Italy. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #24774220.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a rare multisystem disorder in which hearing loss (HL) has been reported. However, no data are available concerning the association between audiological findings, clinical severity score and genotype. METHODS: The study involved 44 pediatric patients aged 1-18 years with a confirmed diagnosis of CdLS, all of whom underwent a full otolaryngological and audiological examination. The presence of NIPBL and SMC1 mutations was also evaluated. RESULTS: According to the severity of clinical phenotypes, 12 (27.3%) children were mild, 15 (34.1%) were moderate and 17 (38.6%) were severe. Thirty-eight children (86%) had OME. Eight children had normal hearing, including one (12.5%) with a severe phenotype. Bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) was diagnosed in 10 children (22.7%): the degree of HL was severe in 8 (80%), all with a severe phenotype. Conductive hearing loss (CHL) was present in 26 patients (59.1%), of whom 8 (30.8%) had a severe phenotype. A severe phenotype was more prevalent among the patients with moderate to severe HL (10/16, 62.5%) than among those with slight/mild HL or normal hearing (7/28, 25.0% p=0.013). NIPBL mutations were detected in 22 patients (50%): 13 (59.1%) with truncating mutations, four (18.2%) with missense mutations, and five (22.7%) with splicing mutations. The frequency of NIPBL truncating mutations was similar in the children with SNHL and those with CHL, whereas this kind of mutation was not found in children with normal hearing. CONCLUSION: Together with SNHL, CHL is an important cause of HL in children with CdLS, and can be associated with a severe phenotype. Moreover, CHL can be associated with NIPBL mutations, particularly truncating mutations. These results highlight the importance of the early identification of audiological problems in children with CdLS and their precise genetic characterization.

4 Article Meningitis complicated by subdural empyema and deafness caused by pneumoccoccal serotype 7F in a 17-month-old child: a case report. 2012

Bosis, S / Semino, M / Picciolli, I / Pinzani, R / Genitori, L / Principi, N / Esposito, S. ·Pediatric Clinic 1, University of Milan, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy. ·J Prev Med Hyg · Pubmed #23240168.

ABSTRACT: Despite the availability of effective antibacterial agents and vaccines, pneumococcal meningitis and sepsis are still associated with high mortality rates and a high risk of neurological sequelae. We describe the case of a 17-month-old boy vaccinated with heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) who developed bacterial meningitis complicated by subdural empyema and deafness caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 7F. The 7F strain is not contained in PCV7 (the only vaccine on the market at the time of the onset of meningitis) but is included in the new pediatric 13-valent PCV, which may therefore prevent cases such as this in the future.