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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Won-Ho Chung
Based on 21 articles published since 2010
(Why 21 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, W-H Chung wrote the following 21 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease. 2015

Lopez-Escamez, Jose A / Carey, John / Chung, Won-Ho / Goebel, Joel A / Magnusson, Måns / Mandalà, Marco / Newman-Toker, David E / Strupp, Michael / Suzuki, Mamoru / Trabalzini, Franco / Bisdorff, Alexandre / Anonymous1830827 / Anonymous1840827 / Anonymous1850827 / Anonymous1860827 / Anonymous1870827. ·Otology and Neurotology Group CTS495, Department of Genomic Medicine, Centre for Genomics and Oncology Research - Pfizer/Universidad de Granada/Junta de Andalucía (GENyO), PTS, Granada, Spain Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital de Poniente, El Ejido, Almeria, Spain. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univerisity School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden. · Otology and Skull Base Department, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italy. · Department of Neurology, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Neurology and German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany. · Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Neurology, Centre Hospitalier Emile Mayrisch, Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg. ·J Vestib Res · Pubmed #25882471.

ABSTRACT: This paper presents diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease jointly formulated by the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society, The Japan Society for Equilibrium Research, the European Academy of Otology and Neurotology (EAONO), the Equilibrium Committee of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) and the Korean Balance Society. The classification includes two categories: definite Menière's disease and probable Menière's disease. The diagnosis of definite Menière's disease is based on clinical criteria and requires the observation of an episodic vertigo syndrome associated with low- to medium-frequency sensorineural hearing loss and fluctuating aural symptoms (hearing, tinnitus and/or fullness) in the affected ear. Duration of vertigo episodes is limited to a period between 20 minutes and 12 hours. Probable Menière's disease is a broader concept defined by episodic vestibular symptoms (vertigo or dizziness) associated with fluctuating aural symptoms occurring in a period from 20 minutes to 24 hours.

2 Review [Diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease according to the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society]. 2017

Lopez-Escamez, J A / Carey, J / Chung, W-H / Goebel, J A / Magnusson, M / Mandalà, M / Newman-Toker, D E / Strupp, M / Suzuki, M / Trabalzini, F / Bisdorff, A. ·Otology and Neurotology Group CTS495, Department of Genomic Medicine - Centre for Genomics and Oncology Research, Pfizer/Universidad de Granada/Junta de Andalucía (GENyO), PTS Avda de la Ilustracion 114, 18016, Granada, Spanien. antonio.lopezescamez@genyo.es. · Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital de Poniente, El Ejido, Spanien. antonio.lopezescamez@genyo.es. · Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Südkorea. · Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Lund, Lund, Schweden. · Otology and Skull Base Department, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italien. · Department of Neurology, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Neurology and German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, Ludwig-Maximilians University, München, Deutschland. · Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Neurology, Centre Hospitalier Emile Mayrisch, Esch an der Alzette, Luxemburg. ·HNO · Pubmed #28770282.

ABSTRACT: This paper presents diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease jointly formulated by the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society, The Japan Society for Equilibrium Research, the European Academy of Otology and Neurotology (EAONO), the Equilibrium Committee of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) and the Korean Balance Society. The classification includes two categories: definite Menière's disease and probable Menière's disease. The diagnosis of definite Menière's disease is based on clinical criteria and requires the observation of an episodic vertigo syndrome associated with low- to medium-frequency sensorineural hearing loss and fluctuating aural symptoms (hearing, tinnitus and/or fullness) in the affected ear. Duration of vertigo episodes is limited to a period between 20 min and 12 h. Probable Menière's disease is a broader concept defined by episodic vestibular symptoms (vertigo or dizziness) associated with fluctuating aural symptoms occurring in a period from 20 min to 24 h.

3 Article Evaluation of Cerebral White Matter in Prelingually Deaf Children Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging. 2018

Park, Kye Hoon / Chung, Won-Ho / Kwon, Hunki / Lee, Jong-Min. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Republic of Korea. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. ·Biomed Res Int · Pubmed #29511689.

ABSTRACT: This study compared white matter development in prelingually deaf and normal-hearing children using a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed in 21 prelingually deaf (DEAF group) and 20 normal-hearing (HEAR group) subjects aged from 1.7 to 7.7 years. Using TBSS, we evaluated the regions of significant difference in fractional anisotropy (FA) between the groups. Correlations between FA values and age in each group were also analyzed using voxel-wise correlation analyses on the TBSS skeleton. Lower FA values of the white matter tract of Heschl's gyrus, the inferior frontooccipital fasciculus, the uncinate fasciculus, the superior longitudinal fasciculus, and the forceps major were evident in the DEAF group compared with those in the HEAR group below 4 years of age, while the difference was not significant in older subjects. We also found that age-related development of the white matter tracts may continue until 8 years of age in deaf children. These results imply that development of the cerebral white matter tracts is delayed in prelingually deaf children.

4 Article Framingham Risk Score as a Prognostic Predictor of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Preliminary Study. 2017

Chang, Young-Soo / Choi, Ji Eun / Ahn, Jungmin / Ryu, Nam-Gyu / Moon, Il Joon / Hong, Sung Hwa / Cho, Yang-Sun / Chung, Won-Ho. ·1 Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sunkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · 2 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Inje University College of Medicine, Republic of Korea. ·Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol · Pubmed #28397567.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Predicting the prognosis of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) remains challenging. This investigation aimed to apply Framingham Risk Scores (FRS) to assess the combination of prognostic factors following ISSHL and investigate the predictive role of FRS in patients with multiple comorbidities including hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective study. METHODS: Twenty-one patients presenting with unilateral idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss and multiple comorbidities were surveyed. Framingham Risk Score was calculated, and patients were assigned into high-risk (FRS ≥20%) and low-risk (FRS <20%) groups. Mean pure tone audiometry (PTA) threshold of both groups and hearing outcomes following established criteria were investigated. All patients were treated with the same protocol of oral methylprednisolone. RESULTS: Overall successful recovery rate (complete + marked recovery) was 23.81%. The mean PTA threshold of the low-risk group showed significant improvement (mean PTA ± standard error, SE: pretreatment, 73.23 ± 11.80; posttreatment, 54.89 ± 10.25, P = .002), while the high-risk group did not show significant improvement in mean PTA threshold (mean PTA ± SE: pretreatment, 71.94 ± 11.77; posttreatment, 68.89 ± 12.81, P = .73). CONCLUSION: Framingham Risk Scores may be useful in predicting outcomes for ISSHL patients with multiple comorbidities.

5 Article Sound Localization and Speech Perception in Noise of Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients: Bimodal Fitting Versus Bilateral Cochlear Implants. 2017

Choi, Ji Eun / Moon, Il Joon / Kim, Eun Yeon / Park, Hee-Sung / Kim, Byung Kil / Chung, Won-Ho / Cho, Yang-Sun / Brown, Carolyn J / Hong, Sung Hwa. ·1Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Speech and Language Pathology, Myongji University Graduate School, Seoul, Korea; 3Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA; and 4Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. ·Ear Hear · Pubmed #28085740.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare binaural performance of auditory localization task and speech perception in babble measure between children who use a cochlear implant (CI) in one ear and a hearing aid (HA) in the other (bimodal fitting) and those who use bilateral CIs. DESIGN: Thirteen children (mean age ± SD = 10 ± 2.9 years) with bilateral CIs and 19 children with bimodal fitting were recruited to participate. Sound localization was assessed using a 13-loudspeaker array in a quiet sound-treated booth. Speakers were placed in an arc from -90° azimuth to +90° azimuth (15° interval) in horizontal plane. To assess the accuracy of sound location identification, we calculated the absolute error in degrees between the target speaker and the response speaker during each trial. The mean absolute error was computed by dividing the sum of absolute errors by the total number of trials. We also calculated the hemifield identification score to reflect the accuracy of right/left discrimination. Speech-in-babble perception was also measured in the sound field using target speech presented from the front speaker. Eight-talker babble was presented in the following four different listening conditions: from the front speaker (0°), from one of the two side speakers (+90° or -90°), from both side speakers (±90°). Speech, spatial, and quality questionnaire was administered. RESULTS: When the two groups of children were directly compared with each other, there was no significant difference in localization accuracy ability or hemifield identification score under binaural condition. Performance in speech perception test was also similar to each other under most babble conditions. However, when the babble was from the first device side (CI side for children with bimodal stimulation or first CI side for children with bilateral CIs), speech understanding in babble by bilateral CI users was significantly better than that by bimodal listeners. Speech, spatial, and quality scores were comparable with each other between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the binaural performance was similar to each other between children who are fit with two CIs (CI + CI) and those who use bimodal stimulation (HA + CI) in most conditions. However, the bilateral CI group showed better speech perception than the bimodal CI group when babble was from the first device side (first CI side for bilateral CI users or CI side for bimodal listeners). Therefore, if bimodal performance is significantly below the mean bilateral CI performance on speech perception in babble, these results suggest that a child should be considered to transit from bimodal stimulation to bilateral CIs.

6 Article Clinical Implication of the Threshold Equalizing Noise Test in Patients With Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss. 2016

Choi, Ji Eun / Lee, Jung Joo / Chung, Won-Ho / Cho, Yang-Sun / Hong, Sung Hwa / Moon, Il Joon. ·*Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center†Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #27631827.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aims of the present study were to investigate the prevalence of cochlear dead regions (DRs) in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) and compare the hearing outcome according to the presence of DRs. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective chart review. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The threshold-equalizing noise (HL) test was performed on a total of 112 ears diagnosed with SSNHL. Ears were divided into two groups based on the presence of DRs. Eighty-two ears belonged to the group without DRs and 30 ears belonged to the group with DRs. There was no difference between the two groups with respect to age, sex, side of affected ear, presence of bilateral SSNHL, presence of vertigo, history of treatment, and initial pure-tone thresholds. Pure-tone audiograms were gathered at the time of initial presentation and at 1, 3, and 6 months after onset of symptoms. RESULTS: The prevalence of DRs was observed to be 29% and was found to be prevalent at 1k and 1.5k Hz in patients with SSNHL. When the hearing thresholds over times were compared between the two groups, subjects with DRs showed significantly poorer hearing outcome compared with those without DRs. The improvements in word recognition scores over times were also less in subject with DRs than those without DRs. CONCLUSION: DRs are associated with worse hearing thresholds at follow-up audiogram and might be associated with unfavorable hearing outcome in patients with SSNHL.

7 Article Factors Associated With Age-related Hearing Impairment: A Retrospective Cohort Study. 2015

Moon, Il Joon / Byun, Hayoung / Woo, Sook-Young / Gwak, Geum-Youn / Hong, Sung Hwa / Chung, Won-Ho / Cho, Yang-Sun. ·From the Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine (IJM, HB, SHH, W-HC, Y-SC) · Biostatistics Team, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute (S-yW) · and Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (G-YG). ·Medicine (Baltimore) · Pubmed #26512592.

ABSTRACT: Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) is a complex degenerative disease in the elderly. As multiple factors interact during the development of ARHI, it is important to elucidate the major influencing factors to understand and prevent ARHI. We aimed to identify risk factors associated with the development of ARHI with a retrospective cohort from 2001 to 2010. The records of the adult subjects over 40 years of age who consecutively underwent a comprehensive health checkup including pure-tone audiometry at the Health Promotion Center were reviewed. During this period, 1560 subjects who underwent pure-tone audiometry more than twice, had no other otologic diseases, and were followed-up more than 2 years were included. A pure-tone average (PTA: 0.5, 1, 2, 4 kHz) was calculated. Development of ARHI was defined as a PTA at follow-up more than 10 dB greater than the baseline PTA. Times to the first development of ARHI were investigated. Overall, 12.7% of subjects developed ARHI within the first 4 years. High blood ionized calcium (hazard ratio [HR] 0.084), albumin (HR 0.239), systolic blood pressure (HR 0.577), thyroid hormone (T3) (HR 0.593), and alpha fetoprotein levels (HR 0.883) were associated with decreased hazard for the development of ARHI. In contrast, high blood high-density lipoprotein (HR 2.105), uric acid (HR 1.684), total protein (HR 1.423), and total bilirubin levels (HR 1.220) were potential risk factors for the development of ARHI. Development of ARHI is common among the aged population, and a variety of factors may interact during this process. The results of this study can be used for counseling of adults at high-risk of developing ARHI with regard to regular audiological check-up.

8 Article Spectrotemporal Modulation Detection and Speech Perception by Cochlear Implant Users. 2015

Won, Jong Ho / Moon, Il Joon / Jin, Sunhwa / Park, Heesung / Woo, Jihwan / Cho, Yang-Sun / Chung, Won-Ho / Hong, Sung Hwa. ·Division of Ophthalmic and Ear, Nose and Throat Devices, Office of Device Evaluation, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, US Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland, United States of America. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, 135-710, Republic of Korea. · School of Electrical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749, Republic of Korea. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #26485715.

ABSTRACT: Spectrotemporal modulation (STM) detection performance was examined for cochlear implant (CI) users. The test involved discriminating between an unmodulated steady noise and a modulated stimulus. The modulated stimulus presents frequency modulation patterns that change in frequency over time. In order to examine STM detection performance for different modulation conditions, two different temporal modulation rates (5 and 10 Hz) and three different spectral modulation densities (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 cycles/octave) were employed, producing a total 6 different STM stimulus conditions. In order to explore how electric hearing constrains STM sensitivity for CI users differently from acoustic hearing, normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners were also tested on the same tasks. STM detection performance was best in NH subjects, followed by HI subjects. On average, CI subjects showed poorest performance, but some CI subjects showed high levels of STM detection performance that was comparable to acoustic hearing. Significant correlations were found between STM detection performance and speech identification performance in quiet and in noise. In order to understand the relative contribution of spectral and temporal modulation cues to speech perception abilities for CI users, spectral and temporal modulation detection was performed separately and related to STM detection and speech perception performance. The results suggest that that slow spectral modulation rather than slow temporal modulation may be important for determining speech perception capabilities for CI users. Lastly, test-retest reliability for STM detection was good with no learning. The present study demonstrates that STM detection may be a useful tool to evaluate the ability of CI sound processing strategies to deliver clinically pertinent acoustic modulation information.

9 Article Objective and Subjective Improvement of Hearing in Noise After Surgical Correction of Unilateral Congenital Aural Atresia in Pediatric Patients: A Prospective Study Using the Hearing in Noise Test, the Sound-Spatial-Quality Questionnaire, and the Glasgow Benefit Inventory. 2015

Byun, Hayoung / Moon, Il Joon / Woo, Sook-Young / Jin, Sun Hwa / Park, Heesung / Chung, Won-Ho / Hong, Sung Hwa / Cho, Yang-Sun. ·1Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea; and 2Biostatistics Team, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul, Korea. ·Ear Hear · Pubmed #25695924.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the objective and subjective long-term binaural benefits of surgical correction in children with unilateral congenital aural atresia, using an open-set sentence test in noise and subjective questionnaires. DESIGN: A prospective study was performed between August 2010 and February 2013. This study included pediatric patients who had unilateral conductive hearing loss (normal bone conduction hearing) on the atretic side but normal air conduction hearing on the normal side and were scheduled to undergo a primary canaloplasty. Pure-tone audiometry, the hearing in noise test (HINT), and questionnaires (Sound-Spatial-Qualities of Hearing Scale; Glasgow Benefit Inventory [GBI]) were administered preoperatively and at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. RESULTS: Among 34 consecutive patients who initially met enrollment criteria, 26 subjects (23 boys and 3 girls) aged 10 to 16 years (mean 12.3 years) completed this study. Canaloplasty and hearing restoration procedures were performed uneventfully in all patients. The mean air conduction thresholds were significantly improved from 63.9 to 35.0 dB (6 months) and 39.4 dB (12 months) after surgery (p < 0.001). In HINT, speech understanding in noise that was presented toward the newly opened atretic ear significantly improved at 1 year postoperatively (p = 0.014). In noise toward the normal ear, speech understanding significantly improved after surgery, from -0.1 dB preoperatively to -2.0 dB at 6 months (p = 0.002) and -1.8 dB at 12 months (p = 0.005) (p for quadratic trend = 0.036). The composite score improved from -2.6 dB preoperatively to -3.4 dB at 6 months and -3.6 dB at 12 months (p = 0.045; p for linear trend = 0.005). The Sound-Spatial-Qualities of Hearing Scale scores in all domains significantly improved 1 year after surgery (p < 0.034). The mean GBI scores in each domain ranged from 14.2 to 49.4. Total GBI score was correlated with better signal to noise ratio in noise toward the atretic ear as measured by HINT at postoperative 1 year (Spearman ρ = 0.482, p = 0.013). CONCLUSIONS: Teenaged patients with unilateral congenital aural atresia showed satisfactory hearing improvement after canaloplasty with hearing restoration surgery. In a serial long-term follow-up, speech understanding in noise measured by HINT improved over time. One year after surgery, teenaged children acquired binaural hearing (binaural squelch), as measured by the HINT with noise presented to the newly opened atretic ear. Subjective questionnaires also showed improvements in binaural hearing function and quality of life.

10 Article Effect of a Bluetooth-implemented hearing aid on speech recognition performance: subjective and objective measurement. 2014

Kim, Min-Beom / Chung, Won-Ho / Choi, Jeesun / Hong, Sung Hwa / Cho, Yang-Sun / Park, Gyuseok / Lee, Sangmin. · ·Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol · Pubmed #24687593.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The object was to evaluate speech perception improvement through Bluetooth-implemented hearing aids in hearing-impaired adults. METHODS: Thirty subjects with bilateral symmetric moderate sensorineural hearing loss participated in this study. A Bluetooth-implemented hearing aid was fitted unilaterally in all study subjects. Objective speech recognition score and subjective satisfaction were measured with a Bluetooth-implemented hearing aid to replace the acoustic connection from either a cellular phone or a loudspeaker system. In each system, participants were assigned to 4 conditions: wireless speech signal transmission into hearing aid (wireless mode) in quiet or noisy environment and conventional speech signal transmission using external microphone of hearing aid (conventional mode) in quiet or noisy environment. Also, participants completed questionnaires to investigate subjective satisfaction. RESULTS: Both cellular phone and loudspeaker system situation, participants showed improvements in sentence and word recognition scores with wireless mode compared to conventional mode in both quiet and noise conditions (P < .001). Participants also reported subjective improvements, including better sound quality, less noise interference, and better accuracy naturalness, when using the wireless mode (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Bluetooth-implemented hearing aids helped to improve subjective and objective speech recognition performances in quiet and noisy environments during the use of electronic audio devices.

11 Article Sound localization performance improves after canaloplasty in unilateral congenital aural atresia patients. 2014

Moon, Il Joon / Byun, Hayoung / Jin, Sun Hwa / Kwon, Seeyoun / Chung, Won-Ho / Hong, Sung Hwa / Cho, Yang-Sun. ·*Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Seoul; and †Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Suwon, Republic of Korea. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #24557035.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the changes in sound localization ability in the horizontal plane after canaloplasty in unilateral congenital aural atresia (CAA) patients. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective interventional study. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Twenty-eight patients with unilateral CAA were enrolled. All patients had unilateral conductive hearing loss. INTERVENTIONS: Canaloplasty. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pure tone audiometry, sound localization test, and the Speech, Spatial, and Quality questionnaire (SSQ) were administered preoperatively, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. For the sound localization test, 8 loudspeakers were positioned in a circle at 45-degree intervals, and patients were instructed to identify the speaker from which sound was coming. Mean correct response rate and mean error degree were calculated for each patient. The correct lateralization rate to the ipsilesional/contralesional stimuli was also calculated. RESULTS: Mean hearing threshold decreased from preoperatively 63.8 to 39.4 dB 12 months after canaloplasty. Mean correct response rate and error degree at preoperative evaluation were 26.0% and 60.7 degrees, respectively, and these were respectively improved to 58.5% and 27.8 degrees postoperatively. Respective mean correct lateralization rate to ipsilesional stimuli after canaloplasty improved from 20.6% to 84.0%, and that to contralesional stimuli slightly improved from 93.8% to 98.8%. Patients with good postoperative hearing (<40 dBHL) showed better sound localization results. In addition, self-assessment scores of spatial domain in the SSQ questionnaire were significantly improved after the operation. CONCLUSION: Sound localization performance improved significantly after canaloplasty. Canaloplasty could provide better localization benefit and subjective improvement in spatial sensation to unilateral CAA patients.

12 Article Performance after timely cochlear implantation in prelingually deaf children with cerebral palsy. 2013

Byun, Hayoung / Moon, Il Joon / Kim, Eun Yeon / Park, Junoh / Kwon, See Youn / Han, Hyo Dam / Chung, Won-Ho / Cho, Yang-Sun / Hong, Sung Hwa. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #23639338.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To investigate auditory perception, speech production, and language ability of prelingually deaf toddlers with cerebral palsy (CP) who were implanted within a sensitive period and who received proper speech therapy. Comparison of their outcomes with age- and sex-matched CI recipients without additional disabilities was also performed. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed a cohort of pediatric CI in Samsung Medical Center. Eight CP subjects who received CI before 3 years of age and age-sex matched control recipients who had no additional disabilities except idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) were included for the analysis. Preoperative evaluation included the Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) score, Korean Version of the Ling's Stage (K-Ling), Sequenced Language Scale for Infants (SELSI), Bailey Scales of Infant Development II assessment, Social Maturity Scale test, and grading of CP severity using severity level and Gross Motor Function Classification System for CP (GMFCS). To measure the outcome, the CAP scores, K-Ling, and SELSI were performed at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after implantation. RESULTS: Four CP children with outstanding performances showed comparable achievement with matched control recipients. These patients had less severe motor disabilities (mild-moderate severity, GMFCS level 1-3), better social quotient, and better cognitive abilities. Although the others showed poor language abilities and hardly produced meaningful speech, their CAP scores reached 1 or 2 in 24 months after implantation. CONCLUSIONS: Deaf children with CP could have various ranges of benefits up to the levels of normal peers whose only disability was hearing loss, when CI was performed within a critical period. Especially, children with mild or moderate CP had a favorable outcome after CI, equivalent to that of normal peers.

13 Article Auditory and speech performance in deaf children with deaf parents after cochlear implant. 2013

Park, Ga Young / Moon, Il Joon / Kim, Eun Yeon / Chung, Eun-Wook / Cho, Yang-Sun / Chung, Won-Ho / Hong, Sung Hwa. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #23324738.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the auditory and speech outcome in deaf children with deaf parents (CDP) after cochlear implantation (CI), emphasizing both the presence of additional caregiver and patients' main communication mode. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case review. SETTING: Cochlear implant center at a tertiary referral hospital. PATIENTS: Fourteen CDP and 14 age- and sex-matched deaf children with normal-hearing parents (CNH). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): The Korean version of Ling's stage (K-Ling) and Category of Auditory Perception (CAP) were administered to the children to assess the speech production and auditory perception abilities, preoperatively and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after CI. To elucidate the effects of the additional caregiver and main communication mode of the implanted child, the patients were divided into the following groups: with additional caregiver(s) who have normal hearing (n = 11) versus without additional caregiver (n = 3); sign language plus oral communication (S+O) group (n = 9) versus oral communication only (O) group (n = 5). RESULTS: CAP scores and K-Ling stages improved remarkably in both CDP and CNH, and no significant differences were found between the 2 groups. Within the CDP group, CAP scores and K-Ling stages improved significantly in CDP with an additional caregiver than those without. Auditory perception and speech production performances in the S+O group were similar to those in the O group. CONCLUSION: CDP can develop similarly to CNH in auditory perception and speech production, if an additional caregiver with normal hearing provides sufficient support and speech input. In addition, using sign language in addition to oral language might not be harmful, and these children can be a communication bridge between their deaf parents and society.

14 Article The auditory and speech performance of children with intellectual disability after cochlear implantation. 2013

Youm, Hye-Youn / Moon, Il Joon / Kim, Eun Yeon / Kim, Bo Young / Cho, Yang-Sun / Chung, Won-Ho / Hong, Sung Hwa. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea. ·Acta Otolaryngol · Pubmed #23066719.

ABSTRACT: CONCLUSION: The results revealed that children with intellectual disability (ID) who underwent cochlear implantation (CI) showed gradual progress in their auditory perception and speech development. ID in children should not be considered a contraindication for CI, because they are able to obtain a chance to develop oral communication skills following CI. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the auditory and speech performance of 14 young deaf children with ID after CI. METHODS: Fourteen children with ID who underwent CI between December 2002 and February 2010 were included. Improvement in auditory perception and speech production over time was evaluated longitudinally with the Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) score and Korean version of Ling's stages (K-Ling). The results were compared with those of age- and gender-matched implanted controls without additional disabilities. All tests were performed four times in each patient: before implantation and at 3, 6, and 12 months after implantation. Preoperative and postoperative communication modes were also assessed and compared between the two groups. RESULTS: Auditory perception and speech production of deaf children with an ID improved consistently after CI. In addition, the communication mode also took a favorable turn from nonverbal to vocalizations or oral communication or from vocalizations to oral communication.

15 Article The clinical significance of preoperative brain magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric cochlear implant recipients. 2012

Moon, Il Joon / Kim, Eun Yeon / Park, Ga-Young / Jang, Min Seok / Kim, Ji Hye / Lee, Jeehun / Chung, Won-Ho / Cho, Yang-Sun / Hong, Sung Hwa. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ·Audiol Neurootol · Pubmed #22907183.

ABSTRACT: Although central nervous system abnormalities are incidentally detected in preoperative brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in pediatric cochlear implant (CI) candidates, the clinical significance of the abnormalities remains unclear. We aimed to assess post-implantation auditory and speech performance in patients with brain lesions seen on MRI. Pediatric CI recipients (n = 177) who underwent preoperative MRI scans of the brain between January 2002 and June 2009 were included in this study. Patients with brain lesions on MRI were reviewed and categorized into the following groups: brain parenchymal lesions (focal vs. diffuse), ventriculomegaly, and extra-axial lesion. The main communication mode as well as progress in auditory perception and speech production were evaluated preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Performance in patients with brain lesions was compared with the age- and sex-matched control group. Various brain lesions were found in 27 out of 177 patients. Children with brain lesions who received CIs showed gradual progress in auditory and speech outcomes for 2 years, though performance was reduced compared with the control group. In addition, there was a significant difference in the main communication mode between the two groups at 2 years following cochlear implantation. This difference was especially significant in patients with diffuse brain parenchymal lesions after further stratification of the brain lesion group. Preoperative brain MRI may have a role in improving the prediction of adverse outcomes in pediatric CI recipients. In particular, children with diffuse brain parenchymal lesions should be counseled regarding the poor prognosis preoperatively, and followed up with special attention.

16 Article Open-type congenital cholesteatoma: differential diagnosis for conductive hearing loss with a normal tympanic membrane. 2012

Kim, Se-Hyung / Cho, Yang-Sun / Chu, Ho-Suk / Jang, Jeon-Yeob / Chung, Won-Ho / Hong, Sung Hwa. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju, South Korea. ·Acta Otolaryngol · Pubmed #22497639.

ABSTRACT: CONCLUSION: In patients with progressive conductive hearing loss and a normal tympanic membrane (TM), and with soft tissue density in the middle ear cavity (MEC) on temporal bone computed tomography (TBCT) scan, open-type congenital cholesteatoma (OCC) should be highly suspected and a proper surgical plan that includes mastoid exploration and second-stage operation is required. OBJECTIVE: The clinical presentation of OCC is very similar to congenital ossicular anomaly (COA) presenting with a conductive hearing loss with intact TM. Therefore, it is challenging to make a correct preoperative diagnosis in patients with OCC. We evaluated the clinical characteristics of OCC compared with those of COA to find diagnostic clues useful in diagnosis of OCC. METHODS: The medical records of 12 patients with surgically proven OCC and 14 patients with surgically proven COA were reviewed for demographic data, otologic history, preoperative TBCT findings, intraoperative findings, and pre- and postoperative audiologic data. RESULTS: There was no difference between OCC and COA based on demographic data, preoperative hearing, and ossicular status on TBCT. However, the presence of progressive hearing loss, soft tissue density in the MEC on TBCT scan, and the need for mastoid surgery and second-stage operation were significantly more frequent in OCC patients.

17 Article Predictive value of electrocochleography for determining hearing outcomes in Ménière's disease. 2012

Moon, Il Joon / Park, Ga Young / Choi, Jeesun / Cho, Yang-Sun / Hong, Sung Hwa / Chung, Won-Ho. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #22246386.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of performing electrocochleography (ECoG) at the initial visit in predicting hearing outcomes. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Tertiary hospital. PATIENTS: Ninety patients with unilateral, definite Ménière's disease. INTERVENTIONS: The summating potential (SP)/action potential (AP) ratio was obtained using ECoG at the initial visits. An SP/AP ratio greater than 0.34 was considered abnormal. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Audiogram types, hearing fluctuations, hearing thresholds at the initial and last visits, hearing changes, caloric response, and treatment outcomes were analyzed in subjects with normal and abnormal ECoGs. Correlation analyses between the SP/AP ratio at the initial visit, hearing thresholds at each visit, and hearing changes were performed. RESULTS: The mean follow-up period was 22.6 months. Abnormal ECoGs were found in 50 (55.6%) of the 90 subjects. No significant differences regarding audiogram types, hearing fluctuations, caloric response, or treatment outcomes were observed between subjects with normal and abnormal ECoGs. Ipsilateral SP/AP ratios at the initial visit were correlated with both hearing thresholds at the initial (r = 0.347, p < 0.001) and last (r = 0.435, p < 0.001) visits. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between SP/AP ratio and hearing change during follow-up (r = 0.280, p = 0.008). After stratification by initial hearing level, Stage 1 and 2 subjects (hearing threshold, 0-40 dB) with abnormal ECoGs at the initial visit showed a decrease in hearing over time compared with those with normal ECoGs (p = 0.008). CONCLUSION: A high SP/AP ratio at the initial visit may be used as a predictor of poor hearing outcomes in subjects with Ménière's disease, especially with initial hearing Stage 1 and 2.

18 Article The influence of various factors on the performance of repetition tests in adults with cochlear implants. 2012

Moon, Il Joon / Kim, Eun Yeon / Jeong, Jin Ok / Chung, Won-Ho / Cho, Yang-Sun / Hong, Sung Hwa. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, 50 Irwon-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, 135-710, Korea. ·Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #21739091.

ABSTRACT: A variety of internal and external factors influence speech perception performance following cochlear implantation (CI) in adult deaf patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the speech perception performance during repetition testing according to various factors and to identify the predictive factors associated with postoperative speech perception. The performances on speech perception under audio-only conditions were examined over time in 61 adult patients with CI. Mono- and bi-syllable and sentence repetition testing, using both the Korean version of the Central Institute for the Deaf (K-CID) and the K-Western Aphasia Battery test (K-WAB), were performed preoperatively and at 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. To elucidate the effect that the etiology of deafness has on postoperative outcome, patients were divided into the following four groups: Prelingual hearing loss (HL) (n = 9), Meningitis (n = 6), Progressive HL (n = 31) and Sudden HL groups (n = 15). Moreover, the duration of HL and deafness was defined as follows: (1) "age of deafness onset: AoD", (2) "number of years between the onset of profound deafness and CI: DoD" and (3) "percentage of the patient's life with moderate-to-profound hearing loss before CI: PoL". DoD and PoL were significantly different between the four groups. Although AoD appeared to be associated with performance on the sentence repetition test before standardizing for education level and age (P = 0.015), there was no association after adjusting for these factors (P = 0.719). Only PoL showed a good correlation with performance on repetition testing after CI after adjusting for AoD and DoD. However, DoD was associated with speech perception performance on the sentence repetition test only. In addition, speech perception performance results in the Progressive and Sudden HL groups were improved over the Prelingual HL and Meningitis groups. The Meningitis group showed the poorest speech perception performance among postlingually deaf adults. Consideration of age, education level, etiology and overall time with hearing loss may be necessary for predicting speech perception outcomes in CI recipients.

19 Article Video pneumatic otoscopy for the diagnosis of conductive hearing loss with normal tympanic membranes. 2011

Lee, Jae Kwon / Cho, Yang-Sun / Ko, Moon Hee / Lee, Won Yong / Kim, Hyung-Jin / Kim, Eunhee / Chung, Won-Ho / Hong, Sung Hwa. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #21493390.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the usefulness of video pneumatic otoscopy (VPO) for the diagnosis of conductive hearing loss (CHL) with normal tympanic membranes (TM). STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: Tertiary care hospital. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Thirty-seven ears with CHL and 9 control ears with normal TMs were included. The VPO was performed preoperatively in all patients. The authors captured TM images in 3 stages of the VPO (static, positive, and negative pressure stage) in all subjects and measured the amount of relative position differences of the umbo. Pure-tone audiometry and temporal bone computed tomography (TBCT) were performed preoperatively. The possible causes of hearing loss were evaluated during exploratory tympanotomy in the patients with CHL. RESULTS: Fifteen patients had stapedial fixation, 10 had fixation of the malleus or incus (MIF), and 12 had ossicular discontinuity. The positional differences between the negative and positive pressure stage of the MIF group were significantly smaller between the CHL and control groups (P = .001). The air-bone gap showed no significant difference among the CHL groups. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of the VPO for the diagnosis of MIF, with a cutoff value of 1.5% or less in terms of the movement of umbo, were 80.0%, 92.6%, and 89.2%, respectively. These findings were comparable to those of the TBCT, which were 90.0%, 85.2%, and 86.5%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The VPO is a simple, noninvasive, and accurate tool for the differential diagnosis of CHL with a normal TM.

20 Article A new measurement tool for speech development based on Ling's stages of speech acquisition in pediatric cochlear implant recipients. 2011

Moon, Il Joon / Kim, Eun Yeon / Chu, Hosuk / Chung, Won-Ho / Cho, Yang-Sun / Hong, Sung Hwa. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, 50 Irwon-dong, Gangnam-gu, 135-710 Seoul, Republic of Korea. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #21295354.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: With the rapid increase of pediatric cochlear implantation (CI), there exists a need for a standardized assessment tool regarding speech and communication skills in children with CI. However, the current testing tools are not appropriate for the longitudinal evaluation of young children after CI. The aims of this study were to describe a progressive testing tool developed for the evaluation of speech acquisition and production in young children who have undergone CI and to examine its validity. METHODS: Sixty children younger than six years of age with CI participated in this study. A Korean version of Ling's stages (K-Ling) was developed based on the Ling speech teaching model to longitudinally assess phonologic and phonetic developments in young children after CI. The K-Ling, the Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP), and the Sequenced Language Scale for Infants (SELSI) were performed in the children with CI preoperatively and three, six, and 12 months postoperatively. Correlations among these three testing tools were analyzed. RESULTS: Auditory, language, and speech skills assessed using the CAP, SELSI, and K-Ling improved continuously for 12 months in young children following CI. Strong correlations were obtained among K-Ling's level, CAP scores, and the equivalent age of SELSI; correlation indices ranged from 0.540 to 0.800. CONCLUSIONS: The K-Ling was a valid evaluation tool regarding speech development in young children who are using CI and who are in the early stages of speech development. Longitudinal assessments of phonetic and phonologic developments may be attainable in young children using the K-Ling.

21 Article Prognostic factors of hearing preservation after gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. 2010

Kim, Chang-Hyun / Chung, Kyu Whan / Kong, Doo-Sik / Nam, Do-Hyun / Park, Kwan / Kim, Jong-Hyun / Hong, Sung Hwa / Cho, Yang-Sun / Chung, Won-Ho / Lee, Jung-Il. ·Department of Neurosurgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, Korea. ·J Clin Neurosci · Pubmed #20056421.

ABSTRACT: We conducted a prospective study to identify prognostic factors of hearing preservation after gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS). Twenty-seven patients with unilateral VS and serviceable hearing underwent GKRS. The mean lesion diameter was 17.3mm (range 6.1-30.0mm), the median marginal dose was 12 Gy (11-15 Gy), and the mean follow-up duration was 35.7 months (9-81 months). The probabilities of hearing preservation after GKRS were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Tumor growth was controlled in 26 of the 27 patients (96.3%), and rates of hearing preservation were 85.1% and 68.1% at 2 and 3 years, respectively. A normal auditory brainstem response (ABR) (p = 0.008) and Gardner-Robertson class I hearing (p = 0.012) before GKRS were found to be significant prognostic factors of a favorable outcome. Our findings suggest that a normal pre GKRS ABR strongly predicts hearing preservation after GKRS. Accordingly, we advise that ABR should be considered with other prognostic factors when GKRS is considered in patients with VS.