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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Carlo Cecchetto
Based on 8 articles published since 2010
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Carlo Cecchetto wrote the following 8 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Spatial biases in deaf, blind, and deafblind individuals as revealed by a haptic line bisection task. 2018

Cattaneo, Zaira / Rinaldi, Luca / Geraci, Carlo / Cecchetto, Carlo / Papagno, Costanza. ·1 Department of Psychology, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy. · 2 Brain Connectivity Center, IRCCS Mondino, Pavia, Italy. · 3 NeuroMI, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy. · 4 Institut Jean Nicod, Département d'études cognitives, ENS, EHESS, CNRS, PSL Research University, Paris, France. · 5 Structures Formelles du Langage, Université Paris 8/CNRS, Paris, France. · 6 CIMeC and CeRiN, University of Trento, Rovereto, Italy. ·Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) · Pubmed #30362405.

ABSTRACT: In this study, we investigated whether auditory deprivation leads to a more balanced bilateral control of spatial attention in the haptic space. We tested four groups of participants: early deaf, early blind, deafblind, and control (normally hearing and sighted) participants. Using a haptic line bisection task, we found that while normally hearing individuals (even when blind) showed a significant tendency to bisect to the left of the veridical midpoint (i.e., pseudoneglect), deaf individuals did not show any significant directional bias. This was the case of both deaf signers and non-signers, in line with prior findings obtained using a visual line bisection task. Interestingly, deafblind individuals also erred significantly to the left, resembling the pattern of early blind and control participants. Overall, these data critically suggest that deafness induces changes in the hemispheric asymmetry subtending the orientation of spatial attention also in the haptic modality. Moreover, our findings indicate that what counterbalances the right-hemisphere dominance in the control of spatial attention is not the lack of auditory input per se, nor sign language use, but rather the heavier reliance on visual experience induced by early auditory deprivation.

2 Article Tactile short-term memory in sensory-deprived individuals. 2017

Papagno, Costanza / Minniti, Giovanna / Mattavelli, Giulia C / Mantovan, Lara / Cecchetto, Carlo. ·Department of Psychology, Centre for Neuroscience Milano, NeuroMi, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza dell'Ateneo Nuovo 1- Edificio U6, 20126, Milano, Italy. costanza.papagno@unimib.it. · Department of Psychology, Centre for Neuroscience Milano, NeuroMi, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza dell'Ateneo Nuovo 1- Edificio U6, 20126, Milano, Italy. · CNRS UMR 7023 Structures Formelles du Langage, Université de Paris 8, Saint-Denis, France. ·Exp Brain Res · Pubmed #27785548.

ABSTRACT: To verify whether loosing a sense or two has consequences on a spared sensory modality, namely touch, and whether these consequences depend on practice or are biologically determined, we investigated 13 deafblind participants, 16 deaf participants, 15 blind participants, and 13 matched normally sighted and hearing controls on a tactile short-term memory task, using checkerboard matrices of increasing length in which half of the squares were made up of a rough texture and half of a smooth one. Time of execution of a fixed matrix, number of correctly reproduced matrices, largest matrix correctly reproduced and tactile span were recorded. The three groups of sensory-deprived individuals did not differ in any measure, while blind and deaf participants outscored controls in all parameters except time of execution; the difference approached significance for deafblind people compared to controls only in one measure, namely correctly reproduced matrices. In blind and deafblind participants, performance negatively correlated with age of Braille acquisition, the older being the subject when acquiring Braille, the lower the performance, suggesting that practice plays a role. However, the fact that deaf participants, who did not share tactile experience, performed similarly to blind participants and significantly better than controls highlights that practice cannot be the only contribution to better tactile memory.

3 Article Deaf, blind or deaf-blind: Is touch enhanced? 2016

Papagno, Costanza / Cecchetto, Carlo / Pisoni, Alberto / Bolognini, Nadia. ·Department of Psychology, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza dell'Ateneo Nuovo 1, 20126, Milan, Italy. costanza.papagno@unimib.it. · NeuroMI, Milan Centre for Neuroscience, Milan, Italy. costanza.papagno@unimib.it. · Department of Psychology, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza dell'Ateneo Nuovo 1, 20126, Milan, Italy. · NeuroMI, Milan Centre for Neuroscience, Milan, Italy. · Laboratory of Neuropsychology, IRCCS Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milan, Italy. ·Exp Brain Res · Pubmed #26573575.

ABSTRACT: When someone looses one type of sensory input, s/he may compensate by using the sensory information conveyed by other senses. To verify whether loosing a sense or two has consequences on a spared sensory modality, namely touch, and whether these consequences depend on the type of sensory loss, we investigated the effects of deafness and blindness on temporal and spatial tactile tasks in deaf, blind and deaf-blind people. Deaf and deaf-blind people performed the spatial tactile task better than the temporal one, while blind and controls showed the opposite pattern. Deaf and deaf-blind participants were impaired in temporal discrimination as compared to controls, while deaf-blind individuals outperformed blind participants in the spatial tactile task. Overall, sensory-deprived participants did not show an enhanced tactile performance. We speculate that discriminative touch is not so relevant in humans, while social touch is. Probably, more complex tactile tasks would have revealed an increased performance in sensory-deprived people.

4 Article Deaf Individuals Show a Leftward Bias in Numerical Bisection. 2016

Cattaneo, Zaira / Cecchetto, Carlo / Papagno, Costanza. ·Department of Psychology, University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy; Brain Connectivity Center, C. Mondino National Neurological Institute, Pavia, Italy zaira.cattaneo@unimib.it. · Department of Psychology, University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy. ·Perception · Pubmed #26562852.

ABSTRACT: Consistent evidence suggests that deaf individuals conceive of numerical magnitude as a left-to-right-oriented mental number line, as typically observed in hearing individuals. When accessing this spatial representation of numbers, normally hearing individuals typically show an attentional bias to the left (pseudoneglect), resembling the attentional bias they show in physical space. Deaf individuals do not show pseudoneglect in representing external space, as assessed by a visual line bisection task. However, whether deaf individuals show attentional biases in representing numerical space has never been investigated before. Here we instructed groups of deaf and hearing individuals to quickly estimate (without calculating) the midpoint of a series of numerical intervals presented in ascending and descending order. Both hearing and deaf individuals were significantly biased toward lower numbers (i.e., the leftward side of the mental number line) in their estimations. Nonetheless, the underestimation bias was smaller in deaf individuals than in the hearing when bisecting pairs of numbers given in descending order. This result may depend on the use of different strategies by deaf and hearing participants or a less pronounced lateralization of deaf individuals in the control of spatial attention.

5 Article Auditory deprivation affects biases of visuospatial attention as measured by line bisection. 2014

Cattaneo, Zaira / Lega, Carlotta / Cecchetto, Carlo / Papagno, Costanza. ·Department of Psychology, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy, zaira.cattaneo@unimib.it. ·Exp Brain Res · Pubmed #24770861.

ABSTRACT: In this study, we investigated whether early deafness affects the typical pattern of hemispheric lateralization [i.e., right hemisphere (RH) dominance] in the control of spatial attention. To this aim, deaf signers, deaf non-signers, hearing signers, and hearing non-signers were required to bisect a series of centrally presented visual lines. The directional bisection bias was found to be significantly different between hearing and deaf participants, irrespective of sign language use. Hearing participants (both signers and non-signers) showed a consistent leftward bias, reflecting RH dominance. Conversely, we observed no evidence of a clear directional bias in deaf signers or non-signers (deaf participants overall showing a non-significant tendency to deviate rightward), suggesting that deafness may be associated to a more bilateral hemispheric engagement in visuospatial tasks.

6 Article Making sense of an unexpected detrimental effect of sign language use in a visual task. 2014

Romero Lauro, Leonor J / Crespi, Marta / Papagno, Costanza / Cecchetto, Carlo. ·University of Milano-Bicocca leonor.romero1@unimib.it. · University of Milano-Bicocca. ·J Deaf Stud Deaf Educ · Pubmed #24737843.

ABSTRACT: What supports deaf signers advantage over nonsigners on visuospatial short-term memory (STM) tasks is still a matter of debate. We compared the performance of 18 deaf Italian Sign Language (LIS) users with that of a matched group of Italian hearing nonsigners in three different tasks: two versions of the Corsi Block test, namely span forward and span backward, and the Visual Pattern Test (VPT). Although the Corsi forward and backward are dynamic and mainly involve a spatial component, the VPT is static and taps primarily the visual component of STM. Signers significantly outperformed nonsigners on both versions of the Corsi Block test, whereas they performed significantly worse on the VPT. We suggest that the source of the different pattern lies in the static nature of the VPT versus the dynamic nature of the Corsi spans.

7 Article Hearing shapes our perception of time: temporal discrimination of tactile stimuli in deaf people. 2012

Bolognini, Nadia / Cecchetto, Carlo / Geraci, Carlo / Maravita, Angelo / Pascual-Leone, Alvaro / Papagno, Costanza. ·Department of Psychology, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza dellʼAteneoNuovo 1, Milan, Italy. costanza.papagno@unimib.it ·J Cogn Neurosci · Pubmed #21916563.

ABSTRACT: Confronted with the loss of one type of sensory input, we compensate using information conveyed by other senses. However, losing one type of sensory information at specific developmental times may lead to deficits across all sensory modalities. We addressed the effect of auditory deprivation on the development of tactile abilities, taking into account changes occurring at the behavioral and cortical level. Congenitally deaf and hearing individuals performed two tactile tasks, the first requiring the discrimination of the temporal duration of touches and the second requiring the discrimination of their spatial length. Compared with hearing individuals, deaf individuals were impaired only in tactile temporal processing. To explore the neural substrate of this difference, we ran a TMS experiment. In deaf individuals, the auditory association cortex was involved in temporal and spatial tactile processing, with the same chronometry as the primary somatosensory cortex. In hearing participants, the involvement of auditory association cortex occurred at a later stage and selectively for temporal discrimination. The different chronometry in the recruitment of the auditory cortex in deaf individuals correlated with the tactile temporal impairment. Thus, early hearing experience seems to be crucial to develop an efficient temporal processing across modalities, suggesting that plasticity does not necessarily result in behavioral compensation.

8 Article Looking for an explanation for the low sign span. Is order involved? 2011

Gozzi, Marta / Geraci, Carlo / Cecchetto, Carlo / Perugini, Marco / Papagno, Costanza. ·Dipartimento di Psicologia, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza dell'Ateneo Nuovo 1, Milan, Italy. ·J Deaf Stud Deaf Educ · Pubmed #20679138.

ABSTRACT: Although signed and speech-based languages have a similar internal organization of verbal short-term memory, sign span is lower than word span. We investigated whether this is due to the fact that signs are not suited for serial recall, as proposed by Bavelier, Newport, Hall, Supalla, and Boutla (2008. Ordered short-term memory differs in signers and speakers: Implications for models of short-term memory. Cognition, 107, 433-459). We administered a serial recall task with stimuli in Italian Sign Language to 12 deaf people, and we compared their performance with that of twelve age-, gender-, and education-matched hearing participants who performed the task in Italian. The results do not offer evidence for the hypothesis that serial order per se is a detrimental factor for deaf participants. An alternative explanation for the lower sign span based on signs being phonologically heavier than words is considered.