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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Brian W. Blakley
Based on 11 articles published since 2009
(Why 11 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Brian Blakley wrote the following 11 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Clinical practice guideline: tinnitus executive summary. 2014

Tunkel, David E / Bauer, Carol A / Sun, Gordon H / Rosenfeld, Richard M / Chandrasekhar, Sujana S / Cunningham, Eugene R / Archer, Sanford M / Blakley, Brian W / Carter, John M / Granieri, Evelyn C / Henry, James A / Hollingsworth, Deena / Khan, Fawad A / Mitchell, Scott / Monfared, Ashkan / Newman, Craig W / Omole, Folashade S / Phillips, C Douglas / Robinson, Shannon K / Taw, Malcolm B / Tyler, Richard S / Waguespack, Richard / Whamond, Elizabeth J. ·Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA dtunkel@jhmi.edu. · Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois, USA. · Partnership for Health Analytic Research, LLC, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA. · New York Otology, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Research and Quality Improvement, American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, Alexandria, Virginia, USA. · Divisions of Rhinology & Sinus Surgery and Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. · Department of Otolaryngology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. · Division of Geriatric Medicine and Aging, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA. · National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA. · ENT Specialists of Northern Virginia, Falls Church, Virginia, USA. · Ochsner Health System, Kenner, Louisiana, USA. · Mitchell & Cavallo, P.C., Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Otology and Neurotology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. · Department of Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Morehouse School of Medicine, East Point, Georgia, USA. · Department of Head and Neck Imaging, Weill Cornell Medical Center, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. · Department of Medicine, UCLA Center for East-West Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. · Consumers United for Evidence-based Healthcare, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #25274374.

ABSTRACT: The American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Tinnitus. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 13 recommendations developed address the evaluation of patients with tinnitus, including selection and timing of diagnostic testing and specialty referral to identify potential underlying treatable pathology. It will then focus on the evaluation and treatment of patients with persistent primary tinnitus, with recommendations to guide the evaluation and measurement of the impact of tinnitus and to determine the most appropriate interventions to improve symptoms and quality of life for tinnitus sufferers.

2 Review Platinum-induced ototoxicity in children: a consensus review on mechanisms, predisposition, and protection, including a new International Society of Pediatric Oncology Boston ototoxicity scale. 2012

Brock, Penelope R / Knight, Kristin R / Freyer, David R / Campbell, Kathleen C M / Steyger, Peter S / Blakley, Brian W / Rassekh, Shahrad R / Chang, Kay W / Fligor, Brian J / Rajput, Kaukab / Sullivan, Michael / Neuwelt, Edward A. ·Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children National Health Service Trust, London, United Kingdom. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #22547603.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The platinum chemotherapy agents cisplatin and carboplatin are widely used in the treatment of adult and pediatric cancers. Cisplatin causes hearing loss in at least 60% of pediatric patients. Reducing cisplatin and high-dose carboplatin ototoxicity without reducing efficacy is important. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This review summarizes recommendations made at the 42nd Congress of the International Society of Pediatric Oncology (SIOP) in Boston, October 21-24, 2010, reflecting input from international basic scientists, pediatric oncologists, otolaryngologists, oncology nurses, audiologists, and neurosurgeons to develop and advance research and clinical trials for otoprotection. RESULTS: Platinum initially impairs hearing in the high frequencies and progresses to lower frequencies with increasing cumulative dose. Genes involved in drug transport, metabolism, and DNA repair regulate platinum toxicities. Otoprotection can be achieved by acting on several these pathways and generally involves antioxidant thiol agents. Otoprotection is a strategy being explored to decrease hearing loss while maintaining dose intensity or allowing dose escalation, but it has the potential to interfere with tumoricidal effects. Route of administration and optimal timing relative to platinum therapy are critical issues. In addition, international standards for grading and comparing ototoxicity are essential to the success of prospective pediatric trials aimed at reducing platinum-induced hearing loss. CONCLUSION: Collaborative prospective basic and clinical trial research is needed to reduce the incidence of irreversible platinum-induced hearing loss, and optimize cancer control. Wide use of the new internationally agreed-on SIOP Boston ototoxicity scale in current and future otoprotection trials should help facilitate this goal.

3 Article Tinnitus Treatment Trends. 2016

Blakley, Brian W. ·Department of Otolaryngology, University of Manitoba, Manitoba, Canada. ·Otol Neurotol · Pubmed #27295447.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) recently published guidelines on the treatment of tinnitus. This paper examines the possible impact of those guidelines on otologic practice. DESIGN: A survey was sent to the members of the American Neurotology Society before and after the publication of Clinical practice guideline: tinnitus. The goals of this study were to see if the guidelines changed attitudes of otologists, confirm what treatments and explanations are being used in the field before and after the guidelines were published. MAIN OUTCOMES: Five hundred fifty-eight surveys were sent out and there were 216 responses. Otologists generally seemed to practice in accordance with the recommendations of the guidelines even before these were published. Drugs and sound therapies were not commonly used for primary tinnitus either before or after publication of the guidelines. One treatment that otologists seemed to have confidence in that was omitted from the guidelines was surgical treatment of hearing loss. CONCLUSION: Opinions regarding the treatment of tinnitus vary considerably. The AAO-HNS clinical practice guideline: tinnitus has not significantly altered the practices of otologists, but the guidelines provide meaningful, important information for other clinicians who deal infrequently with tinnitus.

4 Article Elevated auditory brainstem response thresholds in mice with Connexin36 gene ablation. 2015

Blakley, Brian W / Garcia, Carlos E A / da Sliva, Suzete R / Florêncio, Victor M B / Nagy, James I. ·Department of Otolaryngology, University of Manitoba , Winnipeg , Canada. ·Acta Otolaryngol · Pubmed #25891643.

ABSTRACT: CONCLUSION: Expression of connexin36 (Cx36) and electrical synapses formed by Cx36-containing gap junctions contribute to normal auditory brainstem response thresholds in mice. OBJECTIVES: Electrical synaptic transmission mediated by gap junctions has not been intensively studied in the auditory system. This study used transgenic mice with knockout of the gene coding for the major protein that forms neuronal gap junctions in mammalian brain (Cx36) to evaluate the role of Cx36 in murine hearing. METHODS: Auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were measured in 26 wild-type and 26 Cx36 knockout mice. ABR thresholds were used to assess auditory brainstem function at four frequencies. DPOAEs were delivered for seven frequency pairs to assess cochlear function. RESULTS: The magnitudes of the 2f1-f2 distortion products were not different between Cx36 knockout and wild-type mice, suggesting similar cochlear function in the two groups. ABR thresholds were significantly elevated in the Cx36 knockout compared with the wild-type groups, suggesting impaired function in the auditory brainstem. The results suggest that electrical synapses formed by Cx36-containing gap junctions contribute to auditory sound processing and function at the level of the brainstem, not the cochlea. These findings may be important for understanding human auditory pathology.

5 Article Clinical practice guideline: tinnitus. 2014

Tunkel, David E / Bauer, Carol A / Sun, Gordon H / Rosenfeld, Richard M / Chandrasekhar, Sujana S / Cunningham, Eugene R / Archer, Sanford M / Blakley, Brian W / Carter, John M / Granieri, Evelyn C / Henry, James A / Hollingsworth, Deena / Khan, Fawad A / Mitchell, Scott / Monfared, Ashkan / Newman, Craig W / Omole, Folashade S / Phillips, C Douglas / Robinson, Shannon K / Taw, Malcolm B / Tyler, Richard S / Waguespack, Richard / Whamond, Elizabeth J. ·Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA dtunkel@jhmi.edu. · Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois, USA. · Partnership for Health Analytic Research, LLC, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York at Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA. · New York Otology, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Research and Quality Improvement, American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, Alexandria, Virginia, USA. · Divisions of Rhinology & Sinus Surgery and Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · Department of Otolaryngology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. · Division of Geriatric Medicine and Aging, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA. · National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA. · ENT Specialists of Northern Virginia, Falls Church, Virginia, USA. · Ochsner Health System, Kenner, Louisiana, USA. · Mitchell & Cavallo, P.C., Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Otology and Neurotology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. · Department of Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Morehouse School of Medicine, East Point, Georgia, USA. · Department of Head and Neck Imaging, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. · Department of Medicine, UCLA Center for East-West Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. · Consumers United for Evidence-Based Healthcare, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #25273878.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Tinnitus is the perception of sound without an external source. More than 50 million people in the United States have reported experiencing tinnitus, resulting in an estimated prevalence of 10% to 15% in adults. Despite the high prevalence of tinnitus and its potential significant effect on quality of life, there are no evidence-based, multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines to assist clinicians with management. The focus of this guideline is on tinnitus that is both bothersome and persistent (lasting 6 months or longer), which often negatively affects the patient's quality of life. The target audience for the guideline is any clinician, including nonphysicians, involved in managing patients with tinnitus. The target patient population is limited to adults (18 years and older) with primary tinnitus that is persistent and bothersome. PURPOSE: The purpose of this guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinicians managing patients with tinnitus. This guideline provides clinicians with a logical framework to improve patient care and mitigate the personal and social effects of persistent, bothersome tinnitus. It will discuss the evaluation of patients with tinnitus, including selection and timing of diagnostic testing and specialty referral to identify potential underlying treatable pathology. It will then focus on the evaluation and treatment of patients with persistent primary tinnitus, with recommendations to guide the evaluation and measurement of the effect of tinnitus and to determine the most appropriate interventions to improve symptoms and quality of life for tinnitus sufferers. ACTION STATEMENTS: The development group made a strong recommendation that clinicians distinguish patients with bothersome tinnitus from patients with nonbothersome tinnitus. The development group made a strong recommendation against obtaining imaging studies of the head and neck in patients with tinnitus, specifically to evaluate tinnitus that does not localize to 1 ear, is nonpulsatile, and is not associated with focal neurologic abnormalities or an asymmetric hearing loss. The panel made the following recommendations: Clinicians should (a) perform a targeted history and physical examination at the initial evaluation of a patient with presumed primary tinnitus to identify conditions that if promptly identified and managed may relieve tinnitus; (b) obtain a prompt, comprehensive audiologic examination in patients with tinnitus that is unilateral, persistent (≥ 6 months), or associated with hearing difficulties; (c) distinguish patients with bothersome tinnitus of recent onset from those with persistent symptoms (≥ 6 months) to prioritize intervention and facilitate discussions about natural history and follow-up care; (d) educate patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus about management strategies; (e) recommend a hearing aid evaluation for patients who have persistent, bothersome tinnitus associated with documented hearing loss; and (f) recommend cognitive behavioral therapy to patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus. The panel recommended against (a) antidepressants, anticonvulsants, anxiolytics, or intratympanic medications for the routine treatment of patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus; (b) Ginkgo biloba, melatonin, zinc, or other dietary supplements for treating patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus; and (c) transcranial magnetic stimulation for the routine treatment of patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus. The development group provided the following options: Clinicians may (a) obtain an initial comprehensive audiologic examination in patients who present with tinnitus (regardless of laterality, duration, or perceived hearing status); and (b) recommend sound therapy to patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus. The development group provided no recommendation regarding the effect of acupuncture in patients with persistent, bothersome tinnitus.

6 Article Patients with cochlear implants in the OR--issues and concerns. 2011

Blakley, Brian W. ·Department of Otolaryngology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg. ·Can Oper Room Nurs J · Pubmed #21987904.

ABSTRACT: Safety standards for patients with cochlear implants are difficult to find. Safety standards are, in fact, constantly evolving as more information becomes available. This article provides an overview of current philosophies and guidelines for most medical/surgical interventions, with emphasis on the operating room environment, as indicated by the three manufacturers authorized to market cochlear implants in Canada.

7 Article End points for cisplatin ototoxicity. 2011

Qureshy, Kaiser / Blakley, Brian / Alsaleh, Saad / Quddusi, Taeed / Berard, Sylvie. ·University of Manitoba, and Sylvie Berard: Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, MB. ·J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #21453661.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Hearing loss owing to ototoxicity in humans is usually presumed to be irreversible and stable. Most articles in the literature study the effects of ototoxic agents such as cisplatin only over a few days or weeks. This study focused on the recovery of hearing over several months in mice. The same treatment was applied to guinea pigs to determine whether there were significant differences in response between the two species. METHODS: Thirty-two mice and 37 guinea pigs were randomized to receive either saline or cisplatin (15 mg/kg). After this exposure, we performed auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing on the mice over 8 months and on the guinea pigs for 1 month. RESULTS: Hearing loss owing to cisplatin shows significant variability between and within species. In mice, hearing loss is maximal at about 17 dB during the third month after cisplatin administration but actually improves to the level attributable to presbyacusis. Guinea pigs, however, experience greater, approximately 25 dB hearing loss within a month of administration of the same dose of cisplatin, tested with the same protocol. CONCLUSION: In general, ototoxicity end points should be assessed more than 1 month after exposure for animals. Our observation that hearing loss is incomplete before 1 month in mice opens the possibility of studies for preventive treatment during that time.

8 Article Does sodium thiosulphate delay presbyacusis? 2010

Quddusi, Taeed / Blakley, Brian W / Meen, Eric / Berard, Sylvie / Dewji, Zameel. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba. taeed@shaw.ca ·J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #20643009.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: This study compares the effects of sodium thiosulphate (STS) and normal saline on the prevention of hearing loss. SETTING: Animal research laboratory. METHODS: Sixteen mice were randomized to receive intraperitoneal injections of either normal saline or STS. Auditory brainstem response testing was used to determine baseline and posttreatment hearing thresholds over the course of 1 year. RESULTS: Compared with saline, treatment with STS resulted in a statistically significant improvement in click and pure-tone thresholds until the end of the year. CONCLUSION: STS can significantly delay hearing loss associated with age in this murine model.

9 Article Does intracochlear brain-derived nerve growth factor improve auditory brainstem click thresholds in sensorineural hearing loss? 2010

Meen, Eric / Blakley, Brian / Quddusi, Taeed. ·Department of Otolaryngology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba. ericmeen@gmail.com ·J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #20470666.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine whether intracochlear administration of brain-derived nerve growth factor (BDNF) is associated with lower auditory brainstem response (ABR) click thresholds after cisplatin-induced sensorineural hearing loss. STUDY DESIGN: Animal research study. METHODS: Fifteen normal hearing guinea pigs were studied. In 11 animals, hearing loss was created using cisplatin. One month later, bilateral cochleostomies were then performed. In one ear, BDNF was injected, and in the other, an equivalent volume of saline was injected prior to plugging with fat. In four animals, no cisplatin or BDNF was given, but the cochleostomies were performed bilaterally as surgical controls. ABR testing was then carried out for two subsequent months using clicks to determine thresholds. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant changes in ABR click thresholds between BDNF-treated versus BDNF-untreated ears. The thresholds for the control group that underwent cochleostomy only were actually worse than those for either of the groups that received cisplatin, and the ears that received BDNF had better hearing than either saline or surgical controls, but the results were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Our data do not support the use of intracochlear BDNF for severe hearing loss correction in guinea pigs as used in this protocol.

10 Article Brain-derived nerve growth factor in the treatment of sensorineural hearing loss. 2009

Meen, Eric / Blakley, Brian / Quddusi, Taeed. ·Department of Otolaryngology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. ericmeen@gmail.com ·Laryngoscope · Pubmed #19479743.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: A possible medical treatment for sensorineural hearing loss using brain-derived nerve growth factor (BDNF) was explored. The hypothesis is that direct intracochlear application of BDNF will result in improved hearing. STUDY DESIGN: Animal research study. METHODS: Significant hearing loss was created using cisplatin in 11 guinea pigs. One month later, bilateral cochleostomies were performed placing 0.05 microg of BDNF in one cochlea of each animal prior to plugging with connective tissue. The other cochlea served as a control. Auditory brain-stem response (ABR) testing was then carried out for three months at 6,000, 8,000, 12,000, and 24,000 Hz. RESULTS: ABR thresholds were better in the treated ear for all frequencies. Threshold differences were statistically significantly better two months after treatment (general linear model, repeated measures P = .045). CONCLUSIONS: Intracochlear application of BDNF may prevent hearing loss.

11 Minor Re: Risk of damage to hearing from personal listening devices in young adults. 2009

Blakley, Brian W. · ·J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #19344624.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --