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Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Marit Erna Austeng
Based on 3 articles published since 2009
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Marit Erna Austeng wrote the following 3 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Otitis media with effusion in children with in Down syndrome. 2013

Austeng, Marit Erna / Akre, Harriet / Øverland, Britt / Abdelnoor, Michael / Falkenberg, Eva-Signe / Kværner, Kari Jorunn. ·Østfold Hospital Trust, Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Norway. Marit.Erna.Austeng@so-hf.no ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #23790958.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of otitis media with effusion (OME) in children with Down syndrome (DS), and the associated to hearing loss at the age of 8 years. STUDY DESIGN: A national population based clinical study of all children with DS born in Norway in 2002. RESULTS: OME was found in 20 out of 52 (38%) children. Those with OME had a significant lower hearing level with a mean pure tone average (PTA) of 33.4 dB HL compared to children with no OME whose mean PTA was 21.7 dB HL (p < 0.0001). Verified hearing loss above 25 dB HL in the better hearing ear was found in 12 out of the 20 with OME, compared to 5 out 31 without OME. CONCLUSION: The findings of this present study uncover the increased risk of OME in eight year old children with DS as current otitis media was found in one of three. This reduced hearing ability in children with DS due to OME at age of 8 strongly emphasizes the need for optimal treatment and follow up to optimize hearing rehabilitation. The findings are further supported by the population based study design, the focus on the narrow age band and the high response rate.

2 Article Hearing level in children with Down syndrome at the age of eight. 2013

Austeng, Marit Erna / Akre, Harriet / Falkenberg, Eva-Signe / Øverland, Britt / Abdelnoor, Michael / Kværner, Kari Jorunn. ·Østfold Hospital Trust, Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Norway. Marit.Erna.Austeng@so-hf.no ·Res Dev Disabil · Pubmed #23644229.

ABSTRACT: This study examines the prevalence of hearing loss in children with Down syndrome at the age of 8. All children were examined in the ENT-departments of public hospitals in Norway and the study population consisted of children born in Norway in 2002 with Down syndrome. Hearing loss was defined as pure-tone air-conduction reduction by on average more than 25 dB HL in the best hearing ear. A cross sectional clinical and audiological population based study was chosen as study design. Hearing loss more than 25 dB HL in the best hearing ear was found in 17/49 children (35%). Mild hearing loss was found in 13 children (26%), moderate in 3 (6%) children and severe hearing loss in 1 child (2%). Conductive hearing loss was found in 8 children (16%), 9 children (18%) had a sensory-neural hearing loss, and mixed hearing loss was found in 3 children. Mean hearing level among boys and girls were 30.0 dB HL (SD 15.7) and 25.5 dB HL (SD13.7) respectively, a non-significant difference (p=0.139). In conclusion this study indicates that both conductive and sensorineural hearing loss, is still common in children with Down syndrome children at the age of eight and as much as two thirds of the children may have a bilateral impairment. The study population was under diagnosed in terms of hearing loss and thus our findings underline the importance of continuous audiological follow up of this group of children throughout childhood.

3 Article Maternal infection with toxoplasma gondii in pregnancy and the risk of hearing loss in the offspring. 2010

Austeng, Marit Erna / Eskild, Anne / Jacobsen, Morten / Jenum, Pål A / Whitelaw, Andrew / Engdahl, Bo. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Fredrikstad Hospital Trust, Fredrikstad, Norway. Marit.Erna.Austeng@so-hf.no ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #20053157.

ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between maternal infection with Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) in pregnancy and subsequent risk of hearing loss in the offspring. The study included 27 727 children born in Norway 1992-1994. Maternal toxoplasma infection during pregnancy was ascertained by serological examination and fetal infection was ascertained by parasite detection in amniotic fluid and/or postnatal serological examination. Hearing loss was defined as mean hearing loss >35 dB HL in the better ear averaged over the pure-tone hearing thresholds at 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz, and the children were identified through linkage to the Norwegian Registry of Hearing Loss in Children. Twenty-two of the 27 727 children (0.08%) were diagnosed with hearing loss. Forty women had primary T. gondii infection in pregnancy. None of their offspring had hearing loss. There was also no association between T. gondii infection prior to pregnancy and hearing loss in the offspring. Hence, we did not find any association between T. gondii infection in pregnancy and hearing loss in the offspring.