Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Hearing Disorders: HELP
Articles by Parvaneh Abbasalipour
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Parvaneh Abbasalipour wrote the following 3 articles about Hearing Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Balancing current levels in children with bilateral cochlear implants using electrophysiological and behavioral measures. 2016

Gordon, Karen A / Abbasalipour, Parvaneh / Papsin, Blake C. ·Archie's Cochlear Implant Laboratory, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Room 6D08, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1X8, Canada; Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, St. George Campus, 190 Elizabeth St, Rm 3S438, RFE Building, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2N2, Canada. Electronic address: karen.gordon@utoronto.ca. · Archie's Cochlear Implant Laboratory, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Room 6D08, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1X8, Canada. Electronic address: pabbasal@uwo.ca. · Archie's Cochlear Implant Laboratory, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Room 6D08, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1X8, Canada; Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, St. George Campus, 190 Elizabeth St, Rm 3S438, RFE Building, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2N2, Canada. Electronic address: blake.papsin@utoronto.ca. ·Hear Res · Pubmed #27021590.

ABSTRACT: Children have benefited from bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) over unilateral CIs despite often missing important periods in bilateral auditory development. This suggests a remarkable perceptual ability by children to "work around" abnormal changes in the auditory pathways. Nonetheless, these children rely primarily on interaural level differences as interaural timing cues are more difficult to access or detect. Mismatched levels provided to the two implants could distort interaural level cues thus compromising the benefits of bilateral CI use. We asked whether "balanced" or "centered" perception of bilateral input can be predicted by physiological or behavioral measures. Twenty-four children who had used unilateral CIs for 9.21 ± 2.66 years prior to bilateral implantation participated. "Balanced bilateral levels" were identified by responses occurring with a probability of 50% on the right side of the head and 50% on the left in a two choice lateralization task. Loudness judgments of current presented unilaterally by each implant were measured on a continuous visual scale. Maximum wave eV amplitudes were evoked unilaterally by each implant and matched amplitudes were identified. Balanced bilateral levels were predicted within 10 Clinical Units (CU) in 9 of 13 (69%) children using matched wave eV amplitudes. Bilaterally balanced levels were reasonably predicted by similar loudness judgments (<10% difference between CIs) in only 6 of 13 (46%) children. Results indicate that matching amplitudes of physiological responses can produce a balanced perception of bilateral input despite unilateral strengthening of the auditory pathways and can potentially be used clinically to provide a first approximation of balance/centered levels.

2 Article Perception of binaural cues develops in children who are deaf through bilateral cochlear implantation. 2014

Gordon, Karen A / Deighton, Michael R / Abbasalipour, Parvaneh / Papsin, Blake C. ·Archie's Cochlear Implant Laboratory, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Archie's Cochlear Implant Laboratory, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #25531107.

ABSTRACT: There are significant challenges to restoring binaural hearing to children who have been deaf from an early age. The uncoordinated and poor temporal information available from cochlear implants distorts perception of interaural timing differences normally important for sound localization and listening in noise. Moreover, binaural development can be compromised by bilateral and unilateral auditory deprivation. Here, we studied perception of both interaural level and timing differences in 79 children/adolescents using bilateral cochlear implants and 16 peers with normal hearing. They were asked on which side of their head they heard unilaterally or bilaterally presented click- or electrical pulse- trains. Interaural level cues were identified by most participants including adolescents with long periods of unilateral cochlear implant use and little bilateral implant experience. Interaural timing cues were not detected by new bilateral adolescent users, consistent with previous evidence. Evidence of binaural timing detection was, for the first time, found in children who had much longer implant experience but it was marked by poorer than normal sensitivity and abnormally strong dependence on current level differences between implants. In addition, children with prior unilateral implant use showed a higher proportion of responses to their first implanted sides than children implanted simultaneously. These data indicate that there are functional repercussions of developing binaural hearing through bilateral cochlear implants, particularly when provided sequentially; nonetheless, children have an opportunity to use these devices to hear better in noise and gain spatial hearing.

3 Article Unilateral cochlear implant use promotes normal-like loudness perception in adolescents with childhood deafness. 2014

Steel, Morrison Mansour / Abbasalipour, Parvaneh / Salloum, Claire A M / Hasek, David / Papsin, Blake C / Gordon, Karen A. ·1Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2Department of Otolaryngology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 3Research Institute, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 4Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; and 5Department of Communication Disorders, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·Ear Hear · Pubmed #25072236.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Behavioral measures of cochlear implant (CI) device stimulation levels can be difficult to obtain in individuals with limited or no hearing experience. Loudness measures are particularly challenging. It would therefore be useful to have a battery of objective and behavioral measures to determine CI stimulation levels in listeners with childhood deafness. In the present study, the authors characterized loudness growth in 20 adolescents: 8 with normal hearing and 12 CI participants with pre/perilingual bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. They asked (1) do adolescent CI users with childhood deafness experience similar increases in loudness as their peers with normal hearing? and (2) can loudness be predicted by objective measures of auditory activity? The authors hypothesized that loudness perception would be significantly different between CI and normal-hearing groups and that it would correlate with objective measures. DESIGN: CI users were recruited from the Cochlear Implant Program at The Hospital for Sick Children and all had used unilateral Nucleus CIs for at least 2 years. The dynamic range for each participant was defined as the difference between the behavioral threshold and the electrically evoked stapedius reflex (ESR) threshold. Loudness growth was assessed within this range behaviorally on a continuous visual scale and objectively with physiological measures. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and ESRs were recorded in both groups and electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) of the auditory nerve were recorded in addition in CI listeners. The regression line slopes of ECAP and ABR amplitude growth functions were then calculated and compared with behavioral loudness growth slopes in the upper portion (40-100%) and lower portion (0-40%) of the dynamic range. Electrical pulse stimuli (in CI users) and acoustic clicks (in normal-hearing participants) were presented within each participant's dynamic range. RESULTS: The mean dynamic range in CI listeners was more variable than in normal-hearing individuals. Despite this difference, loudness at the ESR threshold was not significantly different in CI adolescents from their normal-hearing peers, and CI users exhibited normal-like loudness growth. There was a significantly positive correlation between ECAP amplitude growth and loudness growth in CI users in the upper portion of the dynamic range, while ABR wave V amplitude growth was not related to loudness growth in either group. CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed that the ESR threshold is a good measure of comfortably loud levels in adolescents with cochlear implants and their normal-hearing peers. Adolescents using CIs show normal-like rates of loudness growth on average, despite having highly variable dynamic ranges of hearing. Individual rates of loudness growth in the upper dynamic range in CI users can be predicted by the rate of amplitude growth of the ECAP. Thus, the rate of neural recruitment with increasing CI current is important for loudness perception in pre/perilingually deaf listeners and should be considered when programming their CIs.