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Hearing Disorders HELP
Based on 24,681 articles published since 2010
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These are the 24681 published articles about Hearing Disorders that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Clinical Practice Guideline: Sudden Hearing Loss (Update). 2019

Chandrasekhar, Sujana S / Tsai Do, Betty S / Schwartz, Seth R / Bontempo, Laura J / Faucett, Erynne A / Finestone, Sandra A / Hollingsworth, Deena B / Kelley, David M / Kmucha, Steven T / Moonis, Gul / Poling, Gayla L / Roberts, J Kirk / Stachler, Robert J / Zeitler, Daniel M / Corrigan, Maureen D / Nnacheta, Lorraine C / Satterfield, Lisa. ·1 ENT & Allergy Associates, LLP, New York, New York, USA. · 2 Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra-Northwell, Hempstead, New York, USA. · 3 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. · 4 Kaiser Permanente, Walnut Creek, California, USA. · 5 Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 6 University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 7 The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada. · 8 Consumers United for Evidence-Based Healthcare, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 9 Ear, Nose & Throat Specialists of Northern Virginia, PC, Manassas, Virginia, USA. · 10 University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA. · 11 Gould Medical Group-Otolaryngology, Stockton, California, USA. · 12 Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. · 13 Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · 14 StachlerENT, West Bloomfield, Michigan, USA. · 15 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, Alexandria, Virginia, USA. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #31369359.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Sudden hearing loss is a frightening symptom that often prompts an urgent or emergent visit to a health care provider. It is frequently but not universally accompanied by tinnitus and/or vertigo. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss affects 5 to 27 per 100,000 people annually, with about 66,000 new cases per year in the United States. This guideline update provides evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of patients who present with sudden hearing loss. It focuses on sudden sensorineural hearing loss in adult patients aged ≥18 years and primarily on those with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Prompt recognition and management of sudden sensorineural hearing loss may improve hearing recovery and patient quality of life. The guideline update is intended for all clinicians who diagnose or manage adult patients who present with sudden hearing loss. PURPOSE: The purpose of this guideline update is to provide clinicians with evidence-based recommendations in evaluating patients with sudden hearing loss and sudden sensorineural hearing loss, with particular emphasis on managing idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. The guideline update group recognized that patients enter the health care system with sudden hearing loss as a nonspecific primary complaint. Therefore, the initial recommendations of this guideline update address distinguishing sensorineural hearing loss from conductive hearing loss at the time of presentation with hearing loss. They also clarify the need to identify rare, nonidiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss to help separate those patients from those with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss, who are the target population for the therapeutic interventions that make up the bulk of the guideline update. By focusing on opportunities for quality improvement, this guideline should improve diagnostic accuracy, facilitate prompt intervention, decrease variations in management, reduce unnecessary tests and imaging procedures, and improve hearing and rehabilitative outcomes for affected patients. METHODS: Consistent with the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation's "Clinical Practice Guideline Development Manual, Third Edition" (Rosenfeld et al. RESULTS: The guideline update group made DIFFERENCES FROM PRIOR GUIDELINE: Incorporation of new evidence profiles to include quality improvement opportunities, confidence in the evidence, and differences of opinion Included 10 clinical practice guidelines, 29 new systematic reviews, and 36 new randomized controlled trials Highlights the urgency of evaluation and initiation of treatment, if treatment is offered, by emphasizing the time from symptom occurrence Clarification of terminology by changing potentially unclear statements; use of the term

2 Guideline Clinical Practice Guideline: Sudden Hearing Loss (Update) Executive Summary. 2019

Chandrasekhar, Sujana S / Tsai Do, Betty S / Schwartz, Seth R / Bontempo, Laura J / Faucett, Erynne A / Finestone, Sandra A / Hollingsworth, Deena B / Kelley, David M / Kmucha, Steven T / Moonis, Gul / Poling, Gayla L / Roberts, J Kirk / Stachler, Robert J / Zeitler, Daniel M / Corrigan, Maureen D / Nnacheta, Lorraine C / Satterfield, Lisa / Monjur, Taskin M. ·1 ENT & Allergy Associates, LLP, New York, New York, USA. · 2 Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra-Northwell, Hempstead, New York, USA. · 3 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. · 4 University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA. · 5 Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 6 University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 7 The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada. · 8 Consumers United for Evidence-based Healthcare (CUE), Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 9 Ear, Nose & Throat Specialists of Northern Virginia, P.C., Manassas, Virginia, USA. · 10 Gould Medical Group-Otolaryngology, Stockton, California, USA. · 11 Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. · 12 Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · 13 StachlerENT, West Bloomfield, Michigan, USA. · 14 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, Alexandria, Virginia, USA. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #31369349.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Sudden hearing loss is a frightening symptom that often prompts an urgent or emergent visit to a health care provider. It is frequently, but not universally, accompanied by tinnitus and/or vertigo. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss affects 5 to 27 per 100,000 people annually, with about 66,000 new cases per year in the United States. This guideline update provides evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of patients who present with sudden hearing loss. It focuses on sudden sensorineural hearing loss in adult patients aged 18 and over and primarily on those with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Prompt recognition and management of sudden sensorineural hearing loss may improve hearing recovery and patient quality of life. The guideline update is intended for all clinicians who diagnose or manage adult patients who present with sudden hearing loss. PURPOSE: The purpose of this guideline update is to provide clinicians with evidence-based recommendations in evaluating patients with sudden hearing loss and sudden sensorineural hearing loss, with particular emphasis on managing idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. The guideline update group recognized that patients enter the health care system with sudden hearing loss as a nonspecific primary complaint. Therefore, the initial recommendations of this guideline update address distinguishing sensorineural hearing loss from conductive hearing loss at the time of presentation with hearing loss. They also clarify the need to identify rare, nonidiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss to help separate those patients from those with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss, who are the target population for the therapeutic interventions that make up the bulk of the guideline update. By focusing on opportunities for quality improvement, this guideline should improve diagnostic accuracy, facilitate prompt intervention, decrease variations in management, reduce unnecessary tests and imaging procedures, and improve hearing and rehabilitative outcomes for affected patients. METHODS: Consistent with the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation's RESULTS: The guideline update group made strong recommendations for the following: clinicians should distinguish sensorineural hearing loss from conductive hearing loss when a patient first presents with sudden hearing loss (KAS 1); clinicians should educate patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss about the natural history of the condition, the benefits and risks of medical interventions, and the limitations of existing evidence regarding efficacy (KAS 7); and clinicians should counsel patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss who have residual hearing loss and/or tinnitus about the possible benefits of audiological rehabilitation and other supportive measures (KAS 13). These strong recommendations were modified from the initial clinical practice guideline for clarity and timing of intervention. The guideline update group made strong recommendation against the following: clinicians should DIFFERENCES FROM PRIOR GUIDELINE: Incorporation of new evidence profiles to include quality improvement opportunities, confidence in the evidence, and differences of opinion Included 10 clinical practice guidelines, 29 new systematic reviews, and 36 new randomized controlled trials Highlights the urgency of evaluation and initiation of treatment, if treatment is offered, by emphasizing the time from symptom occurrence Clarification of terminology by changing potentially unclear statements; use of the term

3 Guideline Guidelines (short version) of the French Society of Otorhinolaryngology (SFORL) on pediatric cochlear implant indications. 2019

Simon, F / Roman, S / Truy, E / Barone, P / Belmin, J / Blanchet, C / Borel, S / Charpiot, A / Coez, A / Deguine, O / Farinetti, A / Godey, B / Lazard, D / Marx, M / Mosnier, I / Nguyen, Y / Teissier, N / Virole, B / Lescanne, E / Loundon, N. ·Service d'ORL pédiatrique, hôpital Necker - Enfants-Malades, université Paris Descartes, 75015 Paris, France. Electronic address: f.simon@aphp.fr. · Service d'ORL pédiatrique, hôpital La Timone, Aix-Marseille université, 13005 Marseille, France. · Service ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale, hôpital Édouard-Herriot, université Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, 69003 Lyon, France. · Université de Toulouse, CerCo UMR 5549 CNRS, faculté de médecine de Purpan, 31000 Toulouse, France. · Hôpital universitaire Charles-Foix, université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie, 75013 Paris, France. · Service d'ORL pédiatrique, hôpital Arnaud-de-Villeneuve, 34090 Montpellier, France. · Université de Tours, 37000 Tours, France. · Service d'ORL, CHU de Strasbourg, 67200 Strasbourg, France. · CEA-Inserm U1000 Neuroimaging and Psychiatry, service hospitalier Frédéric-Joliot, 91400 Orsay, France. · Service d'ORL, CHU de Toulouse, 31300 Toulouse, France. · Service d'oto-rhino-laryngologie et de chirurgie maxillo-faciale, CHU de Rennes, 35000 Rennes, France. · Institut Arthur-Vernes, 75006 Paris, France; Nottingham University, Nottingham, UK. · Service d'ORL, hôpital Purpan, CHU de Toulouse, université Paul-Sabatier, 31000 Toulouse, France. · AP-HP, groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, service d'ORL, otologie, implants auditifs et chirurgie de la base du crâne, Sorbonne universités, université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie, 75013 Paris, France. · Groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, unité otologie, implants auditifs et chirurgie de la base du crâne, UMR-S 1159 Inserm, université Paris 6 Pierre-et-Marie-Curie, 75013 Paris, France. · Service d'ORL pédiatrique, hôpital Robert-Debré, université Paris-Diderot, Paris, France. · Service d'ORL et audiophonologie infantile, hôpital Robert-Debré, 75019 Paris, France. · Service d'ORL, CHU de Tours, 37000 Tours, France. · Service d'ORL pédiatrique, hôpital Necker - Enfants-Malades, université Paris Descartes, 75015 Paris, France. ·Eur Ann Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Dis · Pubmed #31221590.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The authors present the guidelines of the French Society of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (Société française d'oto-rhino-laryngologie et de chirurgie de la face et du cou - SFORL) on the indications for cochlear implantation in children. METHODS: A multidisciplinary work group was entrusted with a review of the scientific literature on the above topic. Guidelines were drawn up, based on the articles retrieved and the group members' individual experience. They were then read over by an editorial group independent of the work group. The guidelines were graded as A, B, C or expert opinion, by decreasing level of evidence. RESULTS: The SFORL recommends that children with bilateral severe/profound hearing loss be offered bilateral cochlear implantation, with surgery before 12months of age. In sequential bilateral cochlear implantation in children with severe/profound hearing loss, it is recommended to reduce the interval between the two implants, preferably to less than 18months. The SFORL recommends encouraging children with unilateral cochlear implants to wear contralateral hearing aids when residual hearing is present, and recommends assessing perception with hearing-in-noise tests. It is recommended that the surgical technique should try to preserve the residual functional structures of the inner ear as much as possible.

4 Guideline French Society of ENT (SFORL) guidelines. Indications for cochlear implantation in adults. 2019

Hermann, R / Lescanne, E / Loundon, N / Barone, P / Belmin, J / Blanchet, C / Borel, S / Charpiot, A / Coez, A / Deguine, O / Farinetti, A / Godey, B / Lazard, D / Marx, M / Mosnier, I / Nguyen, Y / Teissier, N / Virole, M B / Roman, S / Truy, E. ·Service ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale, hôpital Edouard Herriot, HCL, 5, place d'Arsonval, 69003 Lyon, France. Electronic address: ruben.hermann@chu-lyon.fr. · Service ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale, CHRU de Tours, boulevard Tonnellé, 37044 Tours, France. · Service ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale, hôpital Necker-Enfants-Malades, AP-HP, 149, rue de Sèvres, 75743 Paris, France. · Laboratoire CerCo, UMR 5549, CHU de Purpan, Pavillon Baudot, place du Dr Joseph Baylac, 31300 Toulouse, France. · Service de gériatrie, hôpital Charles-Foix, 7, avenue de la République, 94200 Ivry-sur-Seine, France. · Service ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale, CHRU de Montpellier, 80, avenue Augustin Fliche, 34090 Montpellier, France. · Université de Tours, boulevard Tonnellé, 37032 Tours cedex 1, France. · Service ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale, hôpital de Hautepierre, 1, avenue de Molière, 67200 Strasbourg, France. · Société française d'audiologie, 20, rue Thérèse, 75001 Paris, France. · Service ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale, CHU de Toulouse, place du Dr Joseph Baylac, 31300 Toulouse, France. · Service ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale pédiatrique, hôpital de la Timone, 278, rue Saint-Pierre, 13005 Marseille, France. · Service ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale, hôpital Pontchaillou, 2, rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35033 Rennes cedex 09, France. · Service ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale, hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, AP-HP, 47-83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France. · Service ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale, hôpital Robert-Debré, AP-HP, 48, boulevard Sérurier, 75019 Paris, France. · Service ORL et d'audiophonologie, hôpital Robert-Debré, AP-HP, 48, boulevard Sérurier, 75019 Paris, France. · Service ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale, hôpital Edouard Herriot, HCL, 5, place d'Arsonval, 69003 Lyon, France. ·Eur Ann Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Dis · Pubmed #31005457.

ABSTRACT: The authors present the guidelines of the French Society of ENT and Head and Neck Surgery (SFORL) regarding indications for cochlear implantation in adults. After a literature review by a multidisciplinary workgroup, guidelines were drawn up based on retrieved articles and group-members' experience, then read over by an independent reading group to edit the final version. Guidelines were graded A, B, C or "expert opinion" according to decreasing level of evidence. There is no upper age limit to cochlear implantation in the absence of proven dementia and if autonomy is at least partial. Bilateral implantation may be proposed if unilateral implantation fails to provide sufficiently good spatial localization, speech perception in noise and quality of life, and should be preceded by binaural hearing assessment. Rehabilitation by acoustic and electrical stimulation may be proposed when low-frequency hearing persists. Quality of life should be assessed before and after implantation.

5 Guideline Update on consensus on diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. 2019

Herrera, Mayte / García Berrocal, José Ramón / García Arumí, Ana / Lavilla, María José / Plaza, Guillermo / Anonymous791090. ·Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario de Fuenlabrada, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, España. Electronic address: mariateresa.herrera@salud.madrid.org. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, Universidad Autónoma, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Universidad Autónoma, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Clínico, Universidad de Zaragoza, España. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario de Fuenlabrada, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, España. ·Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp · Pubmed #30093087.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) is a sudden, unexplained unilateral hearing loss. OBJECTIVES: To update the Spanish Consensus on the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of ISSNHL. MATERIAL AND METHODS: After a systematic review of the literature from 1966 to March 2018, on MESH terms «(acute or sudden) hearing loss or deafness», a third update was performed, including 1508 relevant papers. RESULTS: Regarding diagnosis, 11ISSNHL is clinically suspected, the following diagnostic tests are mandatory: otoscopy, acumetry, tonal audiometry, speech audiometry, and tympanometry, to discount conductive causes. After clinical diagnosis has been established, and before treatment is started, a full analysis should be performed. An MRI should then be requested, ideally performed during the first 15 days after diagnosis, to discount specific causes and to help to understand the physiopathological mechanisms in each case. Although treatment is very controversial, due to its effect on quality of life after ISSNHL and the few rare adverse effects associated with short-term steroid treatment, this consensus recommends that all patients should be treated with steroids, orally and/or intratympanically, depending on each patient. In the event of failure of systemic steroids, intratympanic rescue is also recommended. Follow-up should be at day 7, and after 12 months. CONCLUSION: By consensus, results after treatment should be reported as absolute decibels recovered in pure tonal audiometry and as improvement in speech audiometry.

6 Guideline Clinical guideline on bone conduction implants. 2019

Lavilla Martín de Valmaseda, María José / Cavalle Garrido, Laura / Huarte Irujo, Alicia / Núñez Batalla, Faustino / Manrique Rodriguez, Manuel / Ramos Macías, Ángel / de Paula Vernetta, Carlos / Gil-Carcedo Sañudo, Elisa / Lassaletta, Luis / Sánchez-Cuadrado, Isabel / Espinosa Sánchez, Juan Manuel / Batuecas Caletrio, Ángel / Cenjor Español, Carlos. ·Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Clínico Universitario Lozano Blesa, Zaragoza, España; Miembro de la Comisión de Audiología, Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. Electronic address: mjlavilla2004@yahoo.es. · Departamento de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, España; Miembro de la Comisión de Audiología, Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. · Departamento de Otorrinolaringología, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra, España; Miembro de la Comisión de Audiología, Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Central de Asturias, Oviedo, Asturias, España; Miembro de la Comisión de Audiología, Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. · Departamento de Otorrinolaringología, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra, España; Miembro de la Comisión de Otología, Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. · Departamento de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario Materno-Infantil , Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, España; Miembro de la Comisión de Otología, Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. · Departamento de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, España; Miembro de la Comisión de Otología, Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. · Departamento de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario Rio Hortega, Valladolid, España; Miembro de la Comisión de Otología, Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, IdiPAZ. Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, España; Miembro de la Comisión de Otoneurología, Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, IdiPAZ. Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves, Granada, España; Miembro de la Comisión de Otoneurología, Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario de Salamanca, Salamanca, España; Miembro de la Comisión de Otoneurología, Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Madrid, España; Miembro de la Comisión de Otoneurología, Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. ·Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp · Pubmed #29656762.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION AND GOALS: During the last decade there have been multiple and relevant advances in conduction and mixed hearing loss treatment. These advances and the appearance of new devices have extended the indications for bone-conduction implants. The Scientific Committee of Audiology of the Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello SEORL-CCC (Spanish Society of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery), together with the Otology and Otoneurology Committees, have undertaken a review of the current state of bone-conduction devices with updated information, to provide a clinical guideline on bone-conduction implants for otorhinolaryngology specialists, health professionals, health authorities and society in general. METHODS: This clinical guideline on bone-conduction implants contains information on the following: 1) Definition and description of bone-conduction devices; 2) Current and upcoming indications for bone conduction devices: Magnetic resonance compatibility; 3) Organization requirements for a bone-conduction implant programme. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The purpose of this guideline is to describe the different bone-conduction implants, their characteristics and their indications, and to provide coordinated instructions for all the above-mentioned agents for decision making within their specific work areas.

7 Guideline Guideline on cochlear implants. 2019

Manrique, Manuel / Ramos, Ángel / de Paula Vernetta, Carlos / Gil-Carcedo, Elisa / Lassaletta, Luis / Sanchez-Cuadrado, Isabel / Espinosa, Juan Manuel / Batuecas, Ángel / Cenjor, Carlos / Lavilla, María José / Núñez, Faustino / Cavalle, Laura / Huarte, Alicia. ·Miembros de la Comisión de Otología de la Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello, Madrid, España. Electronic address: mmanrique@unav.es. · Miembros de la Comisión de Otología de la Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello, Madrid, España. · Miembros de la Comisión de Otoneurología de la Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello, Madrid, España; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER-U761), Madrid, España. · Miembros de la Comisión de Otoneurología de la Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello, Madrid, España. · Miembros de la Comisión de Audiología de la Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello, Madrid, España. ·Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp · Pubmed #29598832.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: In the last decade numerous hospitals have started to work with patients who are candidates for a cochlear implant (CI) and there have been numerous and relevant advances in the treatment of sensorineural hearing loss that extended the indications for cochlear implants. OBJECTIVES: To provide a guideline on cochlear implants to specialists in otorhinolaryngology, other medical specialities, health authorities and society in general. METHODS: The Scientific Committees of Otology, Otoneurology and Audiology from the Spanish Society of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery (SEORL-CCC), in a coordinated and agreed way, performed a review of the current state of CI based on the existing regulations and in the scientific publications referenced in the bibliography of the document drafted. RESULTS: The clinical guideline on cochlear implants provides information on: a) Definition and description of Cochlear Implant; b) Indications for cochlear implants; c) Organizational requirements for a cochlear implant programme. CONCLUSIONS: A clinical guideline on cochlear implants has been developed by a Committee of Experts of the SEORL-CCC, to help and guide all the health professionals involved in this field of CI in decision-making to treathearing impairment.

8 Guideline Diagnosis and treatment of otitis media with effusion: CODEPEH recommendations. 2019

Núñez-Batalla, Faustino / Jáudenes-Casaubón, Carmen / Sequí-Canet, Jose Miguel / Vivanco-Allende, Ana / Zubicaray-Ugarteche, Jose. ·Presidente de la CODEPEH (Comisión para la detección precoz de la hipoacusia). Electronic address: fnunezb@telefonica.net. · Vocales de la CODEPEH. ·Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp · Pubmed #29033123.

ABSTRACT: The incidence and the prevalence rates of otitis media with effusion (OME) are high. However, there is evidence that only a minority of professionals follow the recommendations provided in clinical practice guidelines. For the purpose of improving diagnosis and treatment of OME in children to prevent and/or reduce its impact on children's development, the Commission for the Early Detection of Deafness (CODEPEH) has deeply reviewed the scientific literature on this field and has drafted a document of recommendations for a correct clinical reaction to of OME, including diagnosis and medical and surgical treatment methodology. Among others, medication, in particular antibiotics and corticoids, should not be prescribed and 3 months of watchful waiting should be the first adopted measure. If OME persists, an ENT doctor should assess the possibility of sugical treatment. The impact of OME in cases of children with a comorbidity is higher, so it requires immediate reaction, without watchful waiting.

9 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2018

Anonymous7200967 / Sharma, Aseem / Kirsch, Claudia F E / Aulino, Joseph M / Chakraborty, Santanu / Choudhri, Asim F / Germano, Isabelle M / Kendi, A Tuba / Kim, H Jeffrey / Lee, Ryan K / Liebeskind, David S / Luttrull, Michael D / Moritani, Toshio / Murad, Gregory J A / Shah, Lubdha M / Shih, Robert Y / Symko, Sophia C / Bykowski, Julie. ·Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Saint Louis, Missouri. Electronic address: sharmaa@mir.wustl.edu. · Panel Chair, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Hospital, Hofstra Medical School, Hempstead, New York. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and the Department of Radiology, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee. · Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York; neurosurgical consultant. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia; American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. · Einstein Healthcare Network, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; American Academy of Neurology. · The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio. · University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa. · University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida; neurosurgical consultant. · University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. · Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland. · Neuroradiology consultant, Denver, Colorado. · Specialty Chair, UC San Diego Health, San Diego, California. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #30392601.

ABSTRACT: This article presents guidelines for imaging utilization in patients presenting with hearing loss or vertigo, symptoms that sometimes occur concurrently due to proximity of receptors and neural pathways responsible for hearing and balance. These guidelines take into account the superiority of CT in providing bony details and better soft-tissue resolution offered by MRI. It should be noted that a dedicated temporal bone CT rather than a head CT best achieves delineation of disease in many of these patients. Similarly, optimal assessment often requires a dedicated high-resolution protocol designed to assess temporal bone and internal auditory canals even though such a study will be requested and billed as a brain MRI. Angiographic techniques are helpful in some patients, especially in the setting of vertigo. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

10 Guideline Occupational Noise-Induced Hearing Loss. 2018

Mirza, Raúl / Kirchner, D Bruce / Dobie, Robert A / Crawford, James / Anonymous5700957. ·American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Elk Grove, Illinois. ·J Occup Environ Med · Pubmed #30095587.

ABSTRACT: : Occupational hearing loss is preventable through a hierarchy of controls, which prioritize the use of engineering controls over administrative controls and personal protective equipment. The occupational and environmental medicine (OEM) physician plays a critical role in the prevention of occupational noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). This position statement clarifies current best practices in the diagnosis of occupational NIHL.

11 Guideline The Role of the Professional Supervisor in the Audiometric Testing Component of Hearing Conservation Programs. 2018

Mirza, Raúl A / Kirchner, D Bruce / Anonymous5690957. ·American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Elk Grove, Illinois. ·J Occup Environ Med · Pubmed #30095586.

ABSTRACT: : ACOEM believes that the functions of a professional supervisor in hearing conservation programs are part of the "core practice" of occupational medicine. This guidance emphasizes the role occupational medicine clinicians play in the supervision of audiometric surveillance conducted under the auspices of hearing conservation programs and reviews the regulatory and scientific basis and pertinent practices involved in this supervisory role.

12 Guideline Hearing loss in adults, assessment and management: summary of NICE guidance. 2018

Ftouh, Saoussen / Harrop-Griffiths, Katherine / Harker, Martin / Munro, Kevin J / Leverton, Ted / Anonymous30170952. ·National Guideline Centre, Royal College of Physicians, London NW1 4LE, UK saoussen.ftouh@rcplondon.ac.uk. · Royal National Throat Nose and Ear Hospital, UCLH NHS Foundation Trust, London WC1X 8DA. · National Guideline Centre, Royal College of Physicians, London NW1 4LE, UK. · Manchester Centre for Audiology and Deafness, School of Health Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK. · Bere Alston, Devon. ·BMJ · Pubmed #29934300.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Guideline French Society of ENT (SFORL) guidelines (short version): Audiometry in adults and children. 2018

Favier, V / Vincent, C / Bizaguet, É / Bouccara, D / Dauman, R / Frachet, B / Le Her, F / Meyer-Bisch, C / Tronche, S / Sterkers-Artières, F / Venail, F. ·ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale, CHU de Montpellier, 34090 Montpellier, France. Electronic address: valentin_favier@hotmail.com. · Service d'otologie et otoneurologie, CHU de Lille, 59037 Lille cedex, France. · Laboratoire de correction auditive, 75001 Paris, France. · Groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris, France. · Unité d'audiologie, université et CHU de Bordeaux, 33000 Bordeaux, France. · Hôpital Rothschild, centre de réglage des implants cochléaires, Association agir pour l'audition/association France Presbyacousie, AP-HP, 75012 Paris, France. · 41, rue de la Tour-de-Beurre, 76000 Rouen, France. · 2, rue Paul-Louis-Courrier, 11000 Narbonne, France. · ORL, 8, rue De-Navarre, 75005 Paris. · Service d'audiophologie, d'otologie et otoneurologie, institut Saint-Pierre, Palavas, CHU de Montpellier, 34090 Montpellier, France. · Inserm 1051, service otologie-otoneurologie, plateforme d'audiologie I-PaudioM, CHU de Montpellier, 34090 Montpellier, France. ·Eur Ann Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Dis · Pubmed #29929777.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: French Society of ENT (SFORL) good practice guidelines for audiometric examination in adults and children. METHODS: A multidisciplinary working group performed a review of the scientific literature. Guidelines were drawn up, reviewed by an independent reading group, and finalized in a consensus meeting. RESULTS: Audiometry should be performed in an acoustically controlled environment (<30dBA); audiometer calibration should be regularly checked; and patient-specific masking rules should be systematically applied. It should be ensured that masking is not overmasking. Adult pure-tone audiometry data should be interpreted taking account of clinical data, speech audiometry and impedancemetry. In case of discrepancies between clinical and pure-tone and speech audiometry data, objective auditory tests should be perform. In children aged 2 years or younger, subjective audiometry should be associated to behavioral audiometry adapted to the child's age. In suspected hearing impairment, behavioral audiometry should be systematically supplemented by objective hearing tests to determine and confirm the level and type of hearing impairment.

14 Guideline None 2018

Martínez Rubioa, Ana / Cortés Rico, Olga / Pallás Alonso, Carmen Rosa / Rando Diego, Álvaro / Sánchez Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco Javier / Colomer Revuelta, Julia / Esparza Olcina, María Jesús / Gallego Iborra, Ana / García Aguado, Jaime / Sánchez-Ventura, José Galbe / Merino Moína, Manuel / Mengual Gil, José María. ·Especialista en Pediatría, Centro de Salud Camas, Sevilla. · Especialista en Pediatría, Centro de Salud Canillejas, Madrid. · Especialista en Pediatría, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid. · Especialista en Pediatría, Centro de Salud Velilla de San Antonio, Mejorada del Campo, Madrid. · Especialista en Pediatría, Centro de Salud Zaidín Sur, Granada. · Especialista en Pediatría, Centro de Salud Fuente de San Luis, Valencia. · Especialista en Pediatría, Centro de Salud Barcelona, Móstoles, Madrid. · Especialista en Pediatría, Centro de Salud Trinidad-Jesús Cautivo, Málaga. · Especialista en Pediatría, Centro de Salud Villablanca, Madrid. · Especialista en Pediatría, Centro de Salud Torrero la Paz, Zaragoza. · Especialista en Pediatría, Centro de Salud el Greco, Getafe, Madrid. · Especialista en Pediatría. Centro de Salud Delicias-Sur, Zaragoza. ·Aten Primaria · Pubmed #29866354.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Guideline Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines on Otologic and Audiologic Screening for Patients With Vestibular Schwannomas. 2018

Sweeney, Alex D / Carlson, Matthew L / Shepard, Neil T / McCracken, D Jay / Vivas, Esther X / Neff, Brian A / Olson, Jeffrey J. ·Bobby R. Alford Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · Department of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Neurosurgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. ·Neurosurgery · Pubmed #29309699.

ABSTRACT: QUESTION 1: What is the expected diagnostic yield for vestibular schwannomas when using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate patients with previously published definitions of asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss? TARGET POPULATION: These recommendations apply to adults with an asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss on audiometric testing. RECOMMENDATION: Level 3: On the basis of an audiogram, it is recommended that MRI screening on patients with ≥10 decibels (dB) of interaural difference at 2 or more contiguous frequencies or ≥15 dB at 1 frequency be pursued to minimize the incidence of undiagnosed vestibular schwannomas. However, selectively screening patients with ≥15 dB of interaural difference at 3000 Hz alone may minimize the incidence of MRIs performed that do not diagnose a vestibular schwannoma. QUESTION 2: What is the expected diagnostic yield for vestibular schwannomas when using an MRI to evaluate patients with asymmetric tinnitus, as defined as either purely unilateral tinnitus or bilateral tinnitus with subjective asymmetry? TARGET POPULATION: These recommendations apply to adults with subjective complaints of asymmetric tinnitus. RECOMMENDATION: Level 3: It is recommended that MRI be used to evaluate patients with asymmetric tinnitus. However, this practice is low yielding in terms of vestibular schwannoma diagnosis (<1%). QUESTION 3: What is the expected diagnostic yield for vestibular schwannomas when using an MRI to evaluate patients with a sudden sensorineural hearing loss? TARGET POPULATION: These recommendations apply to adults with a verified sudden sensorineural hearing loss on an audiogram. RECOMMENDATION: Level 3: It is recommended that MRI be used to evaluate patients with a sudden sensorineural hearing loss. However, this practice is low yielding in terms of vestibular schwannoma diagnosis (<3%).  The full guideline can be found at: https://www.cns.org/guidelines/guidelines-management-patients-vestibular-schwannoma/chapter_2.

16 Guideline Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines on Hearing Preservation Outcomes in Patients With Sporadic Vestibular Schwannomas. 2018

Carlson, Matthew L / Vivas, Esther X / McCracken, D Jay / Sweeney, Alex D / Neff, Brian A / Shepard, Neil T / Olson, Jeffrey J. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic, School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Department of Neurosurgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Bobby R. Alford Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. ·Neurosurgery · Pubmed #29309683.

ABSTRACT: Question 1: What is the overall probability of maintaining serviceable hearing following stereotactic radiosurgery utilizing modern dose planning, at 2, 5, and 10 yr following treatment? Recommendation: Level 3: Individuals who meet these criteria and are considering stereotactic radiosurgery should be counseled that there is moderately high probability (>50%-75%) of hearing preservation at 2 yr, moderately high probability (>50%-75%) of hearing preservation at 5 yr, and moderately low probability (>25%-50%) of hearing preservation at 10 yr. Question 2: Among patients with AAO-HNS (American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery hearing classification) class A or GR (Gardner-Robertson hearing classification) grade I hearing at baseline, what is the overall probability of maintaining serviceable hearing following stereotactic radiosurgery, utilizing modern dose planning, at 2, 5, and 10 yr following treatment? Recommendation: Level 3: Individuals who meet these criteria and are considering stereotactic radiosurgery should be counseled that there is a high probability (>75%-100%) of hearing preservation at 2 yr, moderately high probability (>50%-75%) of hearing preservation at 5 yr, and moderately low probability (>25%-50%) of hearing preservation at 10 yr. Question 3: What patient- and tumor-related factors influence progression to nonserviceable hearing following stereotactic radiosurgery using ≤13 Gy to the tumor margin? Recommendation: Level 3: Individuals who meet these criteria and are considering stereotactic radiosurgery should be counseled regarding the probability of successful hearing preservation based on the following prognostic data: the most consistent prognostic features associated with maintenance of serviceable hearing are good preoperative word recognition and/or pure tone thresholds with variable cut-points reported, smaller tumor size, marginal tumor dose ≤12 Gy, and cochlear dose ≤4 Gy. Age and sex are not strong predictors of hearing preservation outcome. Question 4: What is the overall probability of maintaining serviceable hearing following microsurgical resection of small to medium-sized sporadic vestibular schwannomas early after surgery, at 2, 5, and 10 yr following treatment? Recommendation: Level 3: Individuals who meet these criteria and are considering microsurgical resection should be counseled that there is a moderately low probability (>25%-50%) of hearing preservation immediately following surgery, moderately low probability (>25%-50%) of hearing preservation at 2 yr, moderately low probability (>25%-50%) of hearing preservation at 5 yr, and moderately low probability (>25%-50%) of hearing preservation at 10 yr. Question 5: Among patients with AAO-HNS class A or GR grade I hearing at baseline, what is the overall probability of maintaining serviceable hearing following microsurgical resection of small to medium-sized sporadic vestibular schwannomas early after surgery, at 2, 5, and 10 yr following treatment? Recommendation: Level 3: Individuals who meet these criteria and are considering microsurgical resection should be counseled that there is a moderately high probability (>50%-75%) of hearing preservation immediately following surgery, moderately high probability (>50%-75%) of hearing preservation at 2 yr, moderately high probability (>50%-75%) of hearing preservation at 5 yr, and moderately low probability (>25%-50%) of hearing preservation at 10 yr. Question 6: What patient- and tumor-related factors influence progression to nonserviceable hearing following microsurgical resection of small to medium-sized sporadic vestibular schwannomas? Recommendation: Level 3: Individuals who meet these criteria and are considering microsurgical resection should be counseled regarding the probability of successful hearing preservation based on the following prognostic data: the most consistent prognostic features associated with maintenance of serviceable hearing are good preoperative word recognition and/or pure tone thresholds with variable cut-points reported, smaller tumor size commonly less than 1 cm, and presence of a distal internal auditory canal cerebrospinal fluid fundal cap. Age and sex are not strong predictors of hearing preservation outcome. Question 7: What is the overall probability of maintaining serviceable hearing with conservative observation of vestibular schwannomas at 2, 5, and 10 yr following diagnosis? Recommendation: Level 3: Individuals who meet these criteria and are considering observation should be counseled that there is a high probability (>75%-100%) of hearing preservation at 2 yr, moderately high probability (>50%-75%) of hearing preservation at 5 yr, and moderately low probability (>25%-50%) of hearing preservation at 10 yr. Question 8: Among patients with AAO-HNS class A or GR grade I hearing at baseline, what is the overall probability of maintaining serviceable hearing with conservative observation at 2 and 5 yr following diagnosis? Recommendation: Level 3: Individuals who meet these criteria and are considering stereotactic radiosurgery should be counseled that there is a high probability (>75%-100%) of hearing preservation at 2 yr, and moderately high probability (>50%-75%) of hearing preservation at 5 yr. Insufficient data were available to determine the probability of hearing preservation at 10 yr for this population subset. Question 9: What patient and tumor-related factors influence progression to nonserviceable hearing during conservative observation? Recommendation: Level 3: Individuals who meet these criteria and are considering observation should be counseled regarding probability of successful hearing preservation based on the following prognostic data: the most consistent prognostic features associated with maintenance of serviceable hearing are good preoperative word recognition and/or pure tone thresholds with variable cut-points reported, as well as nongrowth of the tumor. Tumor size at the time of diagnosis, age, and sex do not predict future development of nonserviceable hearing during observation.  The full guideline can be found at: https://www.cns.org/guidelines/guidelines-manage-ment-patients-vestibular-schwannoma/chapter_3.

17 Guideline A good practice guide for translating and adapting hearing-related questionnaires for different languages and cultures. 2018

Hall, Deborah A / Zaragoza Domingo, Silvia / Hamdache, Leila Z / Manchaiah, Vinaya / Thammaiah, Spoorthi / Evans, Chris / Wong, Lena L N / Anonymous12051111. ·a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre , Nottingham , UK. · b Otology and Hearing group Division of Clinical Neuroscience , School of Medicine, University of Nottingham , Nottingham , UK. · c Neuropsychological Research Organization , Barcelona , Spain. · d The Carlton Academy , Nottingham , UK. · e Department of Speech and Hearing , Lamar State University , Beaumont , TX , USA. · f Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research , Linköping University , Linköping , Sweden. · g Department of Speech and Hearing School of Allied Health Sciences , Manipal University , Manipal , India. · h Department of Audiology , All India Institute of Speech and Hearing , Mysore , India. · i Department of Psychology, University of Roehampton , London , UK , and. · j Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Faculty of Education , The University of Hong Kong, Prince Philip Dental Hospital , Hong Kong, China. ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #29161914.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To raise awareness and propose a good practice guide for translating and adapting any hearing-related questionnaire to be used for comparisons across populations divided by language or culture, and to encourage investigators to publish detailed steps. DESIGN: From a synthesis of existing guidelines, we propose important considerations for getting started, followed by six early steps: (1) Preparation, (2, 3) Translation steps, (4) Committee Review, (5) Field testing and (6) Reviewing and finalising the translation. STUDY SAMPLE: Not applicable. RESULTS: Across these six steps, 22 different items are specified for creating a questionnaire that promotes equivalence to the original by accounting for any cultural differences. Published examples illustrate how these steps have been implemented and reported, with shared experiences from the authors, members of the International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology and TINnitus research NETwork. CONCLUSIONS: A checklist of the preferred reporting items is included to help researchers and clinicians make informed choices about conducting or omitting any items. We also recommend using the checklist to document these decisions in any resulting report or publication. Following this step-by-step guide would promote quality assurance in multinational trials and outcome evaluations but, to confirm functional equivalence, large-scale evaluation of psychometric properties should follow.

18 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2017

Anonymous6420925 / Kessler, Marcus M / Moussa, Marwan / Bykowski, Julie / Kirsch, Claudia F E / Aulino, Joseph M / Berger, Kevin L / Choudhri, Asim F / Fife, Terry D / Germano, Isabelle M / Kendi, A Tuba / Kim, Jeffrey H / Luttrull, Michael D / Nunez, Diego / Shah, Lubdha M / Sharma, Aseem / Shetty, Vilaas S / Symko, Sophia C / Cornelius, Rebecca S. ·Principal Author, AllegiantMD, Tampa, Florida. Electronic address: mail@drkessler.info. · Research Author, University of Ankansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas. · Panel Chair, UC San Diego Health, San Diego, California. · Panel Vice Chair North Shore-Long Island Jewish Hospital, Hofstra Medical School, Hempstead, New York. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Chesapeake Medical Imaging, Annapolis, Maryland. · Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee. · Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, Arizona; American Academy of Neurology. · Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York; neurosurgical consultant. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia; American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. · The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio. · Brigham & Women's Hospital & Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of Utah Health Care, Salt Lake City, Utah. · Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Saint Louis, Missouri. · Saint Louis University Hospital, Saint Louis, Missouri. · Kaiser Permanente Franklin Medical Offices, Denver, Colorado. · Specialty Chair, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #29101995.

ABSTRACT: Tinnitus is the perception of sound in the absence of an external source. It is a common symptom that can be related to hearing loss and other benign causes. However, tinnitus may be disabling and can be the only symptom in a patient with a central nervous system process disorder. History and physical examination are crucial first steps to determine the need for imaging. CT and MRI are useful in the setting of pulsatile tinnitus to evaluate for an underlying vascular anomaly or abnormality. If there is concomitant asymmetric hearing loss, neurologic deficit, or head trauma, imaging should be guided by those respective ACR Appropriateness Criteria

19 Guideline Hearing aid fine-tuning based on Dutch descriptions. 2017

Thielemans, Thijs / Pans, Donné / Chenault, Michelene / Anteunis, Lucien. ·a Koninklijke Kentalis, Den Bosch and Sint Michielsgestel , the Netherlands. · b Adelante Audiology and Communication , Hoensbroek , the Netherlands. · c ENT Department , Maastricht University Medical Center, School for Mental Health & Neuroscience , Maastricht , the Netherlands , and. · d Department of Health, Ethics and Society , Maastricht University , Maastricht , the Netherlands. ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #28635499.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to derive an independent fitting assistant based on expert consensus. Two questions were asked: (1) what (Dutch) terms do hearing impaired listeners use nowadays to describe their specific hearing aid fitting problems? (2) What is the expert consensus on how to resolve these complaints by adjusting hearing aid parameters? DESIGN: Hearing aid dispensers provided descriptors that impaired listeners use to describe their reactions to specific hearing aid fitting problems. Hearing aid fitting experts were asked "How would you adjust the hearing aid if its user reports that the aid sounds…?" with the blank filled with each of the 40 most frequently mentioned descriptors. STUDY SAMPLE: 112 hearing aid dispensers and 15 hearing aid experts. The expert solution with the highest weight value was considered the best solution for that descriptor. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to identify a factor structure in fitting problems. RESULTS: Nine fitting problems could be identified resulting in an expert-based, hearing aid manufacturer independent, fine-tuning fitting assistant for clinical use. CONCLUSIONS: The construction of an expert-based, hearing aid manufacturer independent, fine-tuning fitting assistant to be used as an additional tool in the iterative fitting process is feasible.

20 Guideline Consensus Statement of the Indian Academy of Pediatrics on Newborn Hearing Screening. 2017

Anonymous5370909 / Paul, Abraham / Prasad, Chhaya / Kamath, S S / Dalwai, Samir / C Nair, M K / Pagarkar, Waheeda. ·From Child Care Centre, Cochin Hospital; #Max Super Speciality Hospital, Chandigarh; $Welcare Hospital, Vytilla; *New Horizons Group, Mumbai; ‡Kerala University, Thrissur; India, and @Audiovestibular Medicine, Hackney ARK and Royal National Throat Nose and Ear Hospital, London. Correspondence to: Dr Samir Dalwai, Director, New Horizons Child Development Centre, Mumbai.  samyrdalwai@gmail.com. ·Indian Pediatr · Pubmed #28607211.

ABSTRACT: JUSTIFICATION: Hearing impairment is one of the most critical sensory impairments with significant social and psychological consequences. Evidence-based, standardized national guidelines are needed for professionals to screen for hearing impairment during the neonatal period. PROCESS: The meeting on formulation of national consensus guidelines on developmental disorders was organized by Indian Academy of Pediatrics in Mumbai, on 18th and 19th December, 2015. The invited experts included Pediatricians, Developmental Pediatricians, Pediatric Neurologists and Clinical Psychologists. The participants framed guidelines after extensive discussions. OBJECTIVE: To provide guidelines on newborn hearing screening in India. RECOMMENDATIONS: The first screening should be conducted before the neonate's discharge from the hospital - if it 'fails', then it should be repeated after four weeks, or at first immunization visit. If it 'fails' again, then Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) audiometry should be conducted. All babies admitted to intensive care unit should be screened via ABR. All babies with abnormal ABR should undergo detailed evaluation, hearing aid fitting and auditory rehabilitation, before six months of age. The goal is to screen newborn babies before one month of age, diagnose hearing loss before three months of age and start intervention before six months of age.

21 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of otitis media with effusion (OME) in children in Japan, 2015. 2017

Ito, Makoto / Takahashi, Haruo / Iino, Yukiko / Kojima, Hiromi / Hashimoto, Sho / Kamide, Yosuke / Kudo, Fumiyo / Kobayashi, Hitome / Kuroki, Haruo / Nakano, Atsuko / Hidaka, Hiroshi / Takahashi, Goro / Yoshida, Haruo / Nakayama, Takeo. ·Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Jichi Children's Medical Center Tochigi, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, 329-0498, Japan. Electronic address: makoto-ito@jichi.ac.jp. · Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Japan. · Department of Otolaryngology, Jichi Medical University Saitama Medical Center, Japan. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Japan. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, National Sendai Medical Center, Japan. · Kamide Ear Nose and Throat Clinic, Japan. · Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Health Care Science, Chiba Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Japan. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Showa University School of Medicine, Japan. · Sotobo Children's Clinic, Japan. · Division of Otorhinolaryngology, Chiba Children's Hospital, Japan. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Japan. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Japan. · Department of Health Informatics, Kyoto University School of Public Health, Japan. ·Auris Nasus Larynx · Pubmed #28473270.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To (1) indicate the definition, the disease state, methods of diagnosis, and testing for otitis media with effusion (OME) in childhood (<12 years); and (2) recommend methods of treatment in accordance with the evidence-based consensus reached by the Subcommittee of Clinical Practice Guideline for Diagnosis and Management of OME in Children. METHODS: We produced Clinical Questions (CQs) concerning the treatment of OME and searched the literature published until April 2014 according to each theme including CQ, the definition, the disease state, the method of diagnosis, and examination. The recommendations are based on the results of the literature review and the expert opinion of the Subcommittee. RESULTS: Because children with Down's syndrome and cleft palate are susceptible to OME, we categorized OME into low-risk and high-risk groups (e.g., Down's syndrome and cleft palate), and recommended the appropriate treatment for each group. CONCLUSION: In the clinical management of OME in children, Japanese Clinical Practice Guidelines recommend management not only of OME itself, such as effusion in the middle ear and pathological changes in the tympanic membrane, but also pathological abnormality in surrounding organs, such as infectious or inflammatory diseases.

22 Guideline Aetiological diagnosis of child deafness: CODEPEH recommendations. 2017

Núñez-Batalla, Faustino / Jáudenes-Casaubón, Carmen / Sequí-Canet, Jose Miguel / Vivanco-Allende, Ana / Zubicaray-Ugarteche, Jose / Cabanillas-Farpón, Rubén. ·Comisión para la Detección Precoz de la Hipoacusia (CODEPEH), Madrid, España. Electronic address: fnunezb@telefonica.net. · Comisión para la Detección Precoz de la Hipoacusia (CODEPEH), Madrid, España. · Instituto de Medicina Oncológica y Molecular de Asturias (IMOMA), Oviedo, España. ·Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp · Pubmed #27644946.

ABSTRACT: Important progress in the fields of molecular genetics (principally) and diagnostic imaging, together with the lack of a consensus protocol for guiding the diagnostic process after confirming deafness by neonatal screening, have led to this new work document drafted by the Spanish Commission for the Early Detection of Child Deafness (Spanish acronym: CODEPEH). This 2015 Recommendations Document, which is based on the most recent scientific evidence, provides guidance to professionals to support them in making decisions regarding aetiological diagnosis. Such diagnosis should be performed without delay and without impeding early intervention. Early identification of the causes of deafness offers many advantages: it prevents unnecessary trouble for the families, reduces health system expenses caused by performing different tests, and provides prognostic information that may guide therapeutic actions.

23 Guideline International Pediatric Otolaryngology Group (IPOG) consensus recommendations: Hearing loss in the pediatric patient. 2016

Liming, Bryan J / Carter, John / Cheng, Alan / Choo, Daniel / Curotta, John / Carvalho, Daniela / Germiller, John A / Hone, Stephen / Kenna, Margaret A / Loundon, Natalie / Preciado, Diego / Schilder, Anne / Reilly, Brian J / Roman, Stephane / Strychowsky, Julie / Triglia, Jean-Michel / Young, Nancy / Smith, Richard J H. ·Department of Otolaryngology -Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA, USA. Electronic address: Bryan-liming@uiowa.edu. · Department of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA, USA. · Sydney Children's Hospital Network, Sydney, Australia. · Cincinnati Children's Hospital, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, CA, USA. · Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia PA, USA. · Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Otolaryngology and Communication Enhancement, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston MA, USA. · Pediatric ENT Department, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, AP-HP Universite Paris Descartes, Paris, France. · Department of Otolaryngology, Children's National Hospital, Washington DC, USA. · Evident, UCL Ear Institute, Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital, London UK. · Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, La Timone Children's Hospital, Aix-Marseille Universite', Marseille, France. · Paediatric Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery-Children's Hospital at London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago IL, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology -Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA, USA. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #27729144.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide recommendations for the workup of hearing loss in the pediatric patient. METHODS: Expert opinion by the members of the International Pediatric Otolaryngology Group. RESULTS: Consensus recommendations include initial screening and diagnosis as well as the workup of sensorineural, conductive and mixed hearing loss in children. The consensus statement discusses the role of genetic testing and imaging and provides algorithms to guide the workup of children with hearing loss. CONCLUSION: The workup of children with hearing loss can be guided by the recommendations provided herein.

24 Guideline [FEDERAL CLINICAL RECOMMENDATIONS IN DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND PREVENTION OF HEARING LOSS DUE TO NOISE]. 2016

Adeninskaya, E E / Bukhtiarov, I V / Bushmanov, A Iu / Dayhes, N A / Denisov, E I / Izmerov, N F / Mazitova, N N / Pankova, V B / Preobrazhenskaya, E A / Prokopenko, L V / Simonova, N I / Tavartkiladze, G A / Fedina, I N. · ·Med Tr Prom Ekol · Pubmed #27265944.

ABSTRACT: Noise induced hearing loss is a slowly developing hearing impairment, caused by occupational exposure to excessive noise levels, constitutes a lesion of the auditory analyzer and clinically manifested as chronic bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Currently, there is not a treatment that provide a cure of sensorineural hearing loss. Regular, individually tailored treatment should be directed to the pathogenic mechanisms and specific clinical symptoms of hearing loss, as well as the prevention of complications. We recommend using non-drug therapies that can improve blood flow in labyrinth, tissue and cellular metabolism.

25 Guideline Guidelines for the evaluation of hearing aid fitting (2010). 2016

Kodera, Kazuoki / Hosoi, Hiroshi / Okamoto, Makito / Manabe, Toshiki / Kanda, Yukihiko / Shiraishi, Kimio / Sugiuchi, Tomoko / Suzuki, Keiko / Tauchi, Hikaru / Nishimura, Tadashi / Matsuhira, Toshimasa / Ishikawa, Kotaro. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Japan. · President's Office, Nara Medical University, Japan. · Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Japan. · Manabe Clinic, Takamatsu, Japan. · Kanda E·N·T Clinic, Nagasaki Bell Hearing Center, Nagasaki, Japan. · Department of Communication Design Science, Faculty of Design, Kyushu University, Japan. · Sugiuchi Clinic, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Rehabilitation, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences, Japan. · Rinsho Keishin Clinic, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Nara Medical University, Kashihara, Japan. Electronic address: t-nishim@naramed-u.ac.jp. · Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences and Disorders, Kyoto Gakuen University, Japan. · Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital, National Rehabilitation Center for Persons with Disabilities, Japan. ·Auris Nasus Larynx · Pubmed #26654157.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The methods to evaluate the efficacy of the adjusted hearing aid for a hearing-impaired person are fitting tests. The tests include those presently carried out for evaluating hearing aid fitting, and the methods of testing and evaluation have been published as "Guidelines for the evaluation of hearing aid fitting (2010)" by the Japan Audiological Society. METHODS: Guidelines for the following 8 test methods are presented. (1) Measurements of speech performance-intensity functions and speech recognition scores; (2) Assessment of hearing aid fitting from the aspect of tolerance of environmental noise; (3) Measurement of real-ear insertion gain (measurement of sound pressure levels at the eardrum); (4) Measurement of the hearing threshold level and the uncomfortable loudness level (UCL) in sound pressure level (SPL) with an inserted earphone; (5) Aided threshold test in a sound field (functional gain measurement); (6) Prediction of insertion gain and aided threshold from hearing aid characteristics and the pure tone audiogram; (7) Measurement of speech recognition in noise; (8) Assessment of hearing aid fitting using questionnaires. In the above tests, (1) and (2) are mandatory tests, and (3) to (8) are informative tests. RESULTS: By performing test combinations properly selected from the above 8 tests, the benefits of a hearing aid could be determined. CONCLUSION: The above test methods were useful and valuable in determining the efficacy of the adjusted hearing aid for a hearing-impaired person during clinical practice.

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