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Hearing Disorders HELP
Based on 26,755 articles published since 2008
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These are the 26755 published articles about Hearing Disorders that originated from Worldwide during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2018

Anonymous2741124 / Sharma, Aseem / Kirsch, Claudia F E / Aulino, Joseph M / Chakraborty, Santanu / Choudhri, Asim F / Germano, Isabelle M / Kendi, A Tuba / Kim, H Jeffrey / Lee, Ryan K / Liebeskind, David S / Luttrull, Michael D / Moritani, Toshio / Murad, Gregory J A / Shah, Lubdha M / Shih, Robert Y / Symko, Sophia C / Bykowski, Julie. ·Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Saint Louis, Missouri. Electronic address: sharmaa@mir.wustl.edu. · Panel Chair, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Hospital, Hofstra Medical School, Hempstead, New York. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and the Department of Radiology, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee. · Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York; neurosurgical consultant. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia; American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. · Einstein Healthcare Network, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; American Academy of Neurology. · The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio. · University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa. · University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida; neurosurgical consultant. · University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. · Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland. · Neuroradiology consultant, Denver, Colorado. · Specialty Chair, UC San Diego Health, San Diego, California. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #30392601.

ABSTRACT: This article presents guidelines for imaging utilization in patients presenting with hearing loss or vertigo, symptoms that sometimes occur concurrently due to proximity of receptors and neural pathways responsible for hearing and balance. These guidelines take into account the superiority of CT in providing bony details and better soft-tissue resolution offered by MRI. It should be noted that a dedicated temporal bone CT rather than a head CT best achieves delineation of disease in many of these patients. Similarly, optimal assessment often requires a dedicated high-resolution protocol designed to assess temporal bone and internal auditory canals even though such a study will be requested and billed as a brain MRI. Angiographic techniques are helpful in some patients, especially in the setting of vertigo. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

2 Guideline Hearing loss in adults, assessment and management: summary of NICE guidance. 2018

Ftouh, Saoussen / Harrop-Griffiths, Katherine / Harker, Martin / Munro, Kevin J / Leverton, Ted / Anonymous1531079. ·National Guideline Centre, Royal College of Physicians, London NW1 4LE, UK saoussen.ftouh@rcplondon.ac.uk. · Royal National Throat Nose and Ear Hospital, UCLH NHS Foundation Trust, London WC1X 8DA. · National Guideline Centre, Royal College of Physicians, London NW1 4LE, UK. · Manchester Centre for Audiology and Deafness, School of Health Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK. · Bere Alston, Devon. ·BMJ · Pubmed #29934300.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline French Society of ENT (SFORL) guidelines (short version): Audiometry in adults and children. 2018

Favier, V / Vincent, C / Bizaguet, É / Bouccara, D / Dauman, R / Frachet, B / Le Her, F / Meyer-Bisch, C / Tronche, S / Sterkers-Artières, F / Venail, F. ·ORL et chirurgie cervico-faciale, CHU de Montpellier, 34090 Montpellier, France. Electronic address: valentin_favier@hotmail.com. · Service d'otologie et otoneurologie, CHU de Lille, 59037 Lille cedex, France. · Laboratoire de correction auditive, 75001 Paris, France. · Groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris, France. · Unité d'audiologie, université et CHU de Bordeaux, 33000 Bordeaux, France. · Hôpital Rothschild, centre de réglage des implants cochléaires, Association agir pour l'audition/association France Presbyacousie, AP-HP, 75012 Paris, France. · 41, rue de la Tour-de-Beurre, 76000 Rouen, France. · 2, rue Paul-Louis-Courrier, 11000 Narbonne, France. · ORL, 8, rue De-Navarre, 75005 Paris. · Service d'audiophologie, d'otologie et otoneurologie, institut Saint-Pierre, Palavas, CHU de Montpellier, 34090 Montpellier, France. · Inserm 1051, service otologie-otoneurologie, plateforme d'audiologie I-PaudioM, CHU de Montpellier, 34090 Montpellier, France. ·Eur Ann Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Dis · Pubmed #29929777.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: French Society of ENT (SFORL) good practice guidelines for audiometric examination in adults and children. METHODS: A multidisciplinary working group performed a review of the scientific literature. Guidelines were drawn up, reviewed by an independent reading group, and finalized in a consensus meeting. RESULTS: Audiometry should be performed in an acoustically controlled environment (<30dBA); audiometer calibration should be regularly checked; and patient-specific masking rules should be systematically applied. It should be ensured that masking is not overmasking. Adult pure-tone audiometry data should be interpreted taking account of clinical data, speech audiometry and impedancemetry. In case of discrepancies between clinical and pure-tone and speech audiometry data, objective auditory tests should be perform. In children aged 2 years or younger, subjective audiometry should be associated to behavioral audiometry adapted to the child's age. In suspected hearing impairment, behavioral audiometry should be systematically supplemented by objective hearing tests to determine and confirm the level and type of hearing impairment.

4 Guideline A good practice guide for translating and adapting hearing-related questionnaires for different languages and cultures. 2018

Hall, Deborah A / Zaragoza Domingo, Silvia / Hamdache, Leila Z / Manchaiah, Vinaya / Thammaiah, Spoorthi / Evans, Chris / Wong, Lena L N / Anonymous921118. ·a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre , Nottingham , UK. · b Otology and Hearing group Division of Clinical Neuroscience , School of Medicine, University of Nottingham , Nottingham , UK. · c Neuropsychological Research Organization , Barcelona , Spain. · d The Carlton Academy , Nottingham , UK. · e Department of Speech and Hearing , Lamar State University , Beaumont , TX , USA. · f Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research , Linköping University , Linköping , Sweden. · g Department of Speech and Hearing School of Allied Health Sciences , Manipal University , Manipal , India. · h Department of Audiology , All India Institute of Speech and Hearing , Mysore , India. · i Department of Psychology, University of Roehampton , London , UK , and. · j Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Faculty of Education , The University of Hong Kong, Prince Philip Dental Hospital , Hong Kong, China. ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #29161914.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To raise awareness and propose a good practice guide for translating and adapting any hearing-related questionnaire to be used for comparisons across populations divided by language or culture, and to encourage investigators to publish detailed steps. DESIGN: From a synthesis of existing guidelines, we propose important considerations for getting started, followed by six early steps: (1) Preparation, (2, 3) Translation steps, (4) Committee Review, (5) Field testing and (6) Reviewing and finalising the translation. STUDY SAMPLE: Not applicable. RESULTS: Across these six steps, 22 different items are specified for creating a questionnaire that promotes equivalence to the original by accounting for any cultural differences. Published examples illustrate how these steps have been implemented and reported, with shared experiences from the authors, members of the International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology and TINnitus research NETwork. CONCLUSIONS: A checklist of the preferred reporting items is included to help researchers and clinicians make informed choices about conducting or omitting any items. We also recommend using the checklist to document these decisions in any resulting report or publication. Following this step-by-step guide would promote quality assurance in multinational trials and outcome evaluations but, to confirm functional equivalence, large-scale evaluation of psychometric properties should follow.

5 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2017

Anonymous7950925 / Kessler, Marcus M / Moussa, Marwan / Bykowski, Julie / Kirsch, Claudia F E / Aulino, Joseph M / Berger, Kevin L / Choudhri, Asim F / Fife, Terry D / Germano, Isabelle M / Kendi, A Tuba / Kim, Jeffrey H / Luttrull, Michael D / Nunez, Diego / Shah, Lubdha M / Sharma, Aseem / Shetty, Vilaas S / Symko, Sophia C / Cornelius, Rebecca S. ·Principal Author, AllegiantMD, Tampa, Florida. Electronic address: mail@drkessler.info. · Research Author, University of Ankansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas. · Panel Chair, UC San Diego Health, San Diego, California. · Panel Vice Chair North Shore-Long Island Jewish Hospital, Hofstra Medical School, Hempstead, New York. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Chesapeake Medical Imaging, Annapolis, Maryland. · Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee. · Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, Arizona; American Academy of Neurology. · Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York; neurosurgical consultant. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia; American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. · The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio. · Brigham & Women's Hospital & Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of Utah Health Care, Salt Lake City, Utah. · Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Saint Louis, Missouri. · Saint Louis University Hospital, Saint Louis, Missouri. · Kaiser Permanente Franklin Medical Offices, Denver, Colorado. · Specialty Chair, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #29101995.

ABSTRACT: Tinnitus is the perception of sound in the absence of an external source. It is a common symptom that can be related to hearing loss and other benign causes. However, tinnitus may be disabling and can be the only symptom in a patient with a central nervous system process disorder. History and physical examination are crucial first steps to determine the need for imaging. CT and MRI are useful in the setting of pulsatile tinnitus to evaluate for an underlying vascular anomaly or abnormality. If there is concomitant asymmetric hearing loss, neurologic deficit, or head trauma, imaging should be guided by those respective ACR Appropriateness Criteria

6 Guideline Hearing aid fine-tuning based on Dutch descriptions. 2017

Thielemans, Thijs / Pans, Donné / Chenault, Michelene / Anteunis, Lucien. ·a Koninklijke Kentalis, Den Bosch and Sint Michielsgestel , the Netherlands. · b Adelante Audiology and Communication , Hoensbroek , the Netherlands. · c ENT Department , Maastricht University Medical Center, School for Mental Health & Neuroscience , Maastricht , the Netherlands , and. · d Department of Health, Ethics and Society , Maastricht University , Maastricht , the Netherlands. ·Int J Audiol · Pubmed #28635499.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to derive an independent fitting assistant based on expert consensus. Two questions were asked: (1) what (Dutch) terms do hearing impaired listeners use nowadays to describe their specific hearing aid fitting problems? (2) What is the expert consensus on how to resolve these complaints by adjusting hearing aid parameters? DESIGN: Hearing aid dispensers provided descriptors that impaired listeners use to describe their reactions to specific hearing aid fitting problems. Hearing aid fitting experts were asked "How would you adjust the hearing aid if its user reports that the aid sounds…?" with the blank filled with each of the 40 most frequently mentioned descriptors. STUDY SAMPLE: 112 hearing aid dispensers and 15 hearing aid experts. The expert solution with the highest weight value was considered the best solution for that descriptor. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to identify a factor structure in fitting problems. RESULTS: Nine fitting problems could be identified resulting in an expert-based, hearing aid manufacturer independent, fine-tuning fitting assistant for clinical use. CONCLUSIONS: The construction of an expert-based, hearing aid manufacturer independent, fine-tuning fitting assistant to be used as an additional tool in the iterative fitting process is feasible.

7 Guideline Consensus Statement of the Indian Academy of Pediatrics on Newborn Hearing Screening. 2017

Anonymous6380909 / Paul, Abraham / Prasad, Chhaya / Kamath, S S / Dalwai, Samir / C Nair, M K / Pagarkar, Waheeda. ·From Child Care Centre, Cochin Hospital; #Max Super Speciality Hospital, Chandigarh; $Welcare Hospital, Vytilla; *New Horizons Group, Mumbai; ‡Kerala University, Thrissur; India, and @Audiovestibular Medicine, Hackney ARK and Royal National Throat Nose and Ear Hospital, London. Correspondence to: Dr Samir Dalwai, Director, New Horizons Child Development Centre, Mumbai.  samyrdalwai@gmail.com. ·Indian Pediatr · Pubmed #28607211.

ABSTRACT: JUSTIFICATION: Hearing impairment is one of the most critical sensory impairments with significant social and psychological consequences. Evidence-based, standardized national guidelines are needed for professionals to screen for hearing impairment during the neonatal period. PROCESS: The meeting on formulation of national consensus guidelines on developmental disorders was organized by Indian Academy of Pediatrics in Mumbai, on 18th and 19th December, 2015. The invited experts included Pediatricians, Developmental Pediatricians, Pediatric Neurologists and Clinical Psychologists. The participants framed guidelines after extensive discussions. OBJECTIVE: To provide guidelines on newborn hearing screening in India. RECOMMENDATIONS: The first screening should be conducted before the neonate's discharge from the hospital - if it 'fails', then it should be repeated after four weeks, or at first immunization visit. If it 'fails' again, then Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) audiometry should be conducted. All babies admitted to intensive care unit should be screened via ABR. All babies with abnormal ABR should undergo detailed evaluation, hearing aid fitting and auditory rehabilitation, before six months of age. The goal is to screen newborn babies before one month of age, diagnose hearing loss before three months of age and start intervention before six months of age.

8 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of otitis media with effusion (OME) in children in Japan, 2015. 2017

Ito, Makoto / Takahashi, Haruo / Iino, Yukiko / Kojima, Hiromi / Hashimoto, Sho / Kamide, Yosuke / Kudo, Fumiyo / Kobayashi, Hitome / Kuroki, Haruo / Nakano, Atsuko / Hidaka, Hiroshi / Takahashi, Goro / Yoshida, Haruo / Nakayama, Takeo. ·Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Jichi Children's Medical Center Tochigi, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, 329-0498, Japan. Electronic address: makoto-ito@jichi.ac.jp. · Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Japan. · Department of Otolaryngology, Jichi Medical University Saitama Medical Center, Japan. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Japan. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, National Sendai Medical Center, Japan. · Kamide Ear Nose and Throat Clinic, Japan. · Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Health Care Science, Chiba Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Japan. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Showa University School of Medicine, Japan. · Sotobo Children's Clinic, Japan. · Division of Otorhinolaryngology, Chiba Children's Hospital, Japan. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Japan. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Japan. · Department of Health Informatics, Kyoto University School of Public Health, Japan. ·Auris Nasus Larynx · Pubmed #28473270.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To (1) indicate the definition, the disease state, methods of diagnosis, and testing for otitis media with effusion (OME) in childhood (<12 years); and (2) recommend methods of treatment in accordance with the evidence-based consensus reached by the Subcommittee of Clinical Practice Guideline for Diagnosis and Management of OME in Children. METHODS: We produced Clinical Questions (CQs) concerning the treatment of OME and searched the literature published until April 2014 according to each theme including CQ, the definition, the disease state, the method of diagnosis, and examination. The recommendations are based on the results of the literature review and the expert opinion of the Subcommittee. RESULTS: Because children with Down's syndrome and cleft palate are susceptible to OME, we categorized OME into low-risk and high-risk groups (e.g., Down's syndrome and cleft palate), and recommended the appropriate treatment for each group. CONCLUSION: In the clinical management of OME in children, Japanese Clinical Practice Guidelines recommend management not only of OME itself, such as effusion in the middle ear and pathological changes in the tympanic membrane, but also pathological abnormality in surrounding organs, such as infectious or inflammatory diseases.

9 Guideline Aetiological diagnosis of child deafness: CODEPEH recommendations. 2017

Núñez-Batalla, Faustino / Jáudenes-Casaubón, Carmen / Sequí-Canet, Jose Miguel / Vivanco-Allende, Ana / Zubicaray-Ugarteche, Jose / Cabanillas-Farpón, Rubén. ·Comisión para la Detección Precoz de la Hipoacusia (CODEPEH), Madrid, España. Electronic address: fnunezb@telefonica.net. · Comisión para la Detección Precoz de la Hipoacusia (CODEPEH), Madrid, España. · Instituto de Medicina Oncológica y Molecular de Asturias (IMOMA), Oviedo, España. ·Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp · Pubmed #27644946.

ABSTRACT: Important progress in the fields of molecular genetics (principally) and diagnostic imaging, together with the lack of a consensus protocol for guiding the diagnostic process after confirming deafness by neonatal screening, have led to this new work document drafted by the Spanish Commission for the Early Detection of Child Deafness (Spanish acronym: CODEPEH). This 2015 Recommendations Document, which is based on the most recent scientific evidence, provides guidance to professionals to support them in making decisions regarding aetiological diagnosis. Such diagnosis should be performed without delay and without impeding early intervention. Early identification of the causes of deafness offers many advantages: it prevents unnecessary trouble for the families, reduces health system expenses caused by performing different tests, and provides prognostic information that may guide therapeutic actions.

10 Guideline International Pediatric Otolaryngology Group (IPOG) consensus recommendations: Hearing loss in the pediatric patient. 2016

Liming, Bryan J / Carter, John / Cheng, Alan / Choo, Daniel / Curotta, John / Carvalho, Daniela / Germiller, John A / Hone, Stephen / Kenna, Margaret A / Loundon, Natalie / Preciado, Diego / Schilder, Anne / Reilly, Brian J / Roman, Stephane / Strychowsky, Julie / Triglia, Jean-Michel / Young, Nancy / Smith, Richard J H. ·Department of Otolaryngology -Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA, USA. Electronic address: Bryan-liming@uiowa.edu. · Department of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA, USA. · Sydney Children's Hospital Network, Sydney, Australia. · Cincinnati Children's Hospital, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, CA, USA. · Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia PA, USA. · Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Otolaryngology and Communication Enhancement, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston MA, USA. · Pediatric ENT Department, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, AP-HP Universite Paris Descartes, Paris, France. · Department of Otolaryngology, Children's National Hospital, Washington DC, USA. · Evident, UCL Ear Institute, Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital, London UK. · Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, La Timone Children's Hospital, Aix-Marseille Universite', Marseille, France. · Paediatric Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery-Children's Hospital at London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago IL, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology -Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA, USA. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #27729144.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide recommendations for the workup of hearing loss in the pediatric patient. METHODS: Expert opinion by the members of the International Pediatric Otolaryngology Group. RESULTS: Consensus recommendations include initial screening and diagnosis as well as the workup of sensorineural, conductive and mixed hearing loss in children. The consensus statement discusses the role of genetic testing and imaging and provides algorithms to guide the workup of children with hearing loss. CONCLUSION: The workup of children with hearing loss can be guided by the recommendations provided herein.

11 Guideline [FEDERAL CLINICAL RECOMMENDATIONS IN DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND PREVENTION OF HEARING LOSS DUE TO NOISE]. 2016

Adeninskaya, E E / Bukhtiarov, I V / Bushmanov, A Iu / Dayhes, N A / Denisov, E I / Izmerov, N F / Mazitova, N N / Pankova, V B / Preobrazhenskaya, E A / Prokopenko, L V / Simonova, N I / Tavartkiladze, G A / Fedina, I N. · ·Med Tr Prom Ekol · Pubmed #27265944.

ABSTRACT: Noise induced hearing loss is a slowly developing hearing impairment, caused by occupational exposure to excessive noise levels, constitutes a lesion of the auditory analyzer and clinically manifested as chronic bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Currently, there is not a treatment that provide a cure of sensorineural hearing loss. Regular, individually tailored treatment should be directed to the pathogenic mechanisms and specific clinical symptoms of hearing loss, as well as the prevention of complications. We recommend using non-drug therapies that can improve blood flow in labyrinth, tissue and cellular metabolism.

12 Guideline Guidelines for the evaluation of hearing aid fitting (2010). 2016

Kodera, Kazuoki / Hosoi, Hiroshi / Okamoto, Makito / Manabe, Toshiki / Kanda, Yukihiko / Shiraishi, Kimio / Sugiuchi, Tomoko / Suzuki, Keiko / Tauchi, Hikaru / Nishimura, Tadashi / Matsuhira, Toshimasa / Ishikawa, Kotaro. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Japan. · President's Office, Nara Medical University, Japan. · Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Japan. · Manabe Clinic, Takamatsu, Japan. · Kanda E·N·T Clinic, Nagasaki Bell Hearing Center, Nagasaki, Japan. · Department of Communication Design Science, Faculty of Design, Kyushu University, Japan. · Sugiuchi Clinic, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Rehabilitation, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences, Japan. · Rinsho Keishin Clinic, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Nara Medical University, Kashihara, Japan. Electronic address: t-nishim@naramed-u.ac.jp. · Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences and Disorders, Kyoto Gakuen University, Japan. · Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital, National Rehabilitation Center for Persons with Disabilities, Japan. ·Auris Nasus Larynx · Pubmed #26654157.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The methods to evaluate the efficacy of the adjusted hearing aid for a hearing-impaired person are fitting tests. The tests include those presently carried out for evaluating hearing aid fitting, and the methods of testing and evaluation have been published as "Guidelines for the evaluation of hearing aid fitting (2010)" by the Japan Audiological Society. METHODS: Guidelines for the following 8 test methods are presented. (1) Measurements of speech performance-intensity functions and speech recognition scores; (2) Assessment of hearing aid fitting from the aspect of tolerance of environmental noise; (3) Measurement of real-ear insertion gain (measurement of sound pressure levels at the eardrum); (4) Measurement of the hearing threshold level and the uncomfortable loudness level (UCL) in sound pressure level (SPL) with an inserted earphone; (5) Aided threshold test in a sound field (functional gain measurement); (6) Prediction of insertion gain and aided threshold from hearing aid characteristics and the pure tone audiogram; (7) Measurement of speech recognition in noise; (8) Assessment of hearing aid fitting using questionnaires. In the above tests, (1) and (2) are mandatory tests, and (3) to (8) are informative tests. RESULTS: By performing test combinations properly selected from the above 8 tests, the benefits of a hearing aid could be determined. CONCLUSION: The above test methods were useful and valuable in determining the efficacy of the adjusted hearing aid for a hearing-impaired person during clinical practice.

13 Guideline [CODEPEH 2014 recommendations for the early detection of delayed hearing loss]. 2016

Núñez-Batalla, Faustino / Jáudenes-Casaubón, Carmen / Sequí-Canet, José Miguel / Vivanco-Allende, Ana / Zubicaray-Ugarteche, José. ·Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo, Asturias, España. · Confederación Española de Familias de Personas Sordas (FIAPAS), Madrid, España. · Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital de Gandía, Gandía, Valencia, España. · Área de Gestión Clínica de Pediatría, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo, Asturias, España. Electronic address: anaviall@hotmail.com. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología Infantil, Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra, España. ·An Pediatr (Barc) · Pubmed #26276692.

ABSTRACT: The latest scientific literature considers early diagnosis of deafness as key element to define the educational prognosis and inclusion of the deaf child, as advantage can be taken in the critical period of development (0-4 years). Highly significant differences exist between those deaf persons who have been stimulated early and those who have received late or inappropriate intervention. Early identification of late-onset disorders requires special attention and knowledge of all childcare professionals. Programs and additional actions beyond neonatal screening should be designed and planned in order to ensure that every child with a significant hearing loss is detected early. For this purpose, the Committee for the Early Detection of Deafness (CODEPEH) would like to highlight the need for continuous monitoring on the hearing health of children. And, for this reason, CODEPEH drafts the recommendations included in the present document.

14 Guideline [Guideline of diagnosis and treatment of sudden deafness (2015)]. 2015

Anonymous8420852. · ·Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi · Pubmed #26695792.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Guideline Diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease. 2015

Lopez-Escamez, Jose A / Carey, John / Chung, Won-Ho / Goebel, Joel A / Magnusson, Måns / Mandalà, Marco / Newman-Toker, David E / Strupp, Michael / Suzuki, Mamoru / Trabalzini, Franco / Bisdorff, Alexandre / Anonymous1830827 / Anonymous1840827 / Anonymous1850827 / Anonymous1860827 / Anonymous1870827. ·Otology and Neurotology Group CTS495, Department of Genomic Medicine, Centre for Genomics and Oncology Research - Pfizer/Universidad de Granada/Junta de Andalucía (GENyO), PTS, Granada, Spain Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital de Poniente, El Ejido, Almeria, Spain. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univerisity School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden. · Otology and Skull Base Department, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italy. · Department of Neurology, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Neurology and German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany. · Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Neurology, Centre Hospitalier Emile Mayrisch, Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg. ·J Vestib Res · Pubmed #25882471.

ABSTRACT: This paper presents diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease jointly formulated by the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society, The Japan Society for Equilibrium Research, the European Academy of Otology and Neurotology (EAONO), the Equilibrium Committee of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) and the Korean Balance Society. The classification includes two categories: definite Menière's disease and probable Menière's disease. The diagnosis of definite Menière's disease is based on clinical criteria and requires the observation of an episodic vertigo syndrome associated with low- to medium-frequency sensorineural hearing loss and fluctuating aural symptoms (hearing, tinnitus and/or fullness) in the affected ear. Duration of vertigo episodes is limited to a period between 20 minutes and 12 hours. Probable Menière's disease is a broader concept defined by episodic vestibular symptoms (vertigo or dizziness) associated with fluctuating aural symptoms occurring in a period from 20 minutes to 24 hours.

16 Guideline Clinical practice guideline: tinnitus executive summary. 2014

Tunkel, David E / Bauer, Carol A / Sun, Gordon H / Rosenfeld, Richard M / Chandrasekhar, Sujana S / Cunningham, Eugene R / Archer, Sanford M / Blakley, Brian W / Carter, John M / Granieri, Evelyn C / Henry, James A / Hollingsworth, Deena / Khan, Fawad A / Mitchell, Scott / Monfared, Ashkan / Newman, Craig W / Omole, Folashade S / Phillips, C Douglas / Robinson, Shannon K / Taw, Malcolm B / Tyler, Richard S / Waguespack, Richard / Whamond, Elizabeth J. ·Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA dtunkel@jhmi.edu. · Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois, USA. · Partnership for Health Analytic Research, LLC, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA. · New York Otology, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Research and Quality Improvement, American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, Alexandria, Virginia, USA. · Divisions of Rhinology & Sinus Surgery and Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. · Department of Otolaryngology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. · Division of Geriatric Medicine and Aging, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA. · National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA. · ENT Specialists of Northern Virginia, Falls Church, Virginia, USA. · Ochsner Health System, Kenner, Louisiana, USA. · Mitchell & Cavallo, P.C., Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Otology and Neurotology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. · Department of Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Morehouse School of Medicine, East Point, Georgia, USA. · Department of Head and Neck Imaging, Weill Cornell Medical Center, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. · Department of Medicine, UCLA Center for East-West Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama, USA. · Consumers United for Evidence-based Healthcare, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #25274374.

ABSTRACT: The American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Tinnitus. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 13 recommendations developed address the evaluation of patients with tinnitus, including selection and timing of diagnostic testing and specialty referral to identify potential underlying treatable pathology. It will then focus on the evaluation and treatment of patients with persistent primary tinnitus, with recommendations to guide the evaluation and measurement of the impact of tinnitus and to determine the most appropriate interventions to improve symptoms and quality of life for tinnitus sufferers.

17 Guideline Principles and guidelines for early intervention after confirmation that a child is deaf or hard of hearing. 2014

Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine. ·Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences, University of Colorado, Campus Box 409, Boulder, CO 80309-0409. Christie.Yoshi@Colorado.EDU. ·J Deaf Stud Deaf Educ · Pubmed #24131505.

ABSTRACT: This document is a supplement to the year 2007 position statement of the Joint Committee on Infant Hearing and provides comprehensive guidelines for establishing strong early intervention (EI) systems with appropriate expertise to meet the needs of children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH). Optimal outcomes can only be achieved when there is high quality to the universal newborn hearing screening programs, the audiologic diagnostic process of confirmation that a child is D/HH and fitting of amplification, and the provision of appropriate, individualized, targeted, and high-quality EI services. There are 12 best practice guidelines for EI programs that include the provision of timely referral to EI services with providers who have knowledge and skills in early childhood deafness and hearing loss, infusion within the system of partnerships with parents as well as professionals who are D/HH, longitudinal developmental assessments for monitoring the child's development, data management systems that include developmental outcomes, a process to monitor the fidelity of the intervention, and appropriate services for children with additional disabilities, those from non-English speaking families, and those from special populations, including unilateral hearing loss and auditory neuropathy/dyssynchrony.

18 Guideline [The Königsteiner Empfehlung of 2012 - essential alterations and modifications]. 2013

Brusis, T / Wolf, U / Meister, E F / Anonymous1420764. ·Institut für Begutachtung, Köln. ·Laryngorhinootologie · Pubmed #23860785.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Since 1974, the recommendation for assessment of hearing impairment caused by noise - formerly known as "Königsteiner Merkblatt" (now: "Königsteiner Empfehlung") - has been representing the state of the art for the assessment of the occupational disease BK-No. 2301. It was updated several times, the last time in 2012. It provides a summary of the current medical knowledge. A new measurement for the entire working life - the Effective Noise Dose by Liedtke - was introduced. Otoacoustic emissions (OAE) are now the crucial tests in order to detect a hair cell dysfunction. As from now the tinnitus has to be put under a more comprehensive examination. On the strength of post experience the previous speech audiometry (Freiburger Test) is reliable, it was retrained. In future the indication for hearing aids will be oriented towards the aid guidelines of the legal health insurance. The questionnaire for the expert opinion was revised and the fee was adapted.

19 Guideline Clinical practice guideline: Tympanostomy tubes in children. 2013

Rosenfeld, Richard M / Schwartz, Seth R / Pynnonen, Melissa A / Tunkel, David E / Hussey, Heather M / Fichera, Jeffrey S / Grimes, Alison M / Hackell, Jesse M / Harrison, Melody F / Haskell, Helen / Haynes, David S / Kim, Tae W / Lafreniere, Denis C / LeBlanc, Katie / Mackey, Wendy L / Netterville, James L / Pipan, Mary E / Raol, Nikhila P / Schellhase, Kenneth G. ·Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York 11201, USA. richrosenfeld@msn.com ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #23818543.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Insertion of tympanostomy tubes is the most common ambulatory surgery performed on children in the United States. Tympanostomy tubes are most often inserted because of persistent middle ear fluid, frequent ear infections, or ear infections that persist after antibiotic therapy. Despite the frequency of tympanostomy tube insertion, there are currently no clinical practice guidelines in the United States that address specific indications for surgery. This guideline is intended for any clinician involved in managing children, aged 6 months to 12 years, with tympanostomy tubes or being considered for tympanostomy tubes in any care setting, as an intervention for otitis media of any type. PURPOSE: The primary purpose of this clinical practice guideline is to provide clinicians with evidence-based recommendations on patient selection and surgical indications for and management of tympanostomy tubes in children. The development group broadly discussed indications for tube placement, perioperative management, care of children with indwelling tubes, and outcomes of tympanostomy tube surgery. Given the lack of current published guidance on surgical indications, the group focused on situations in which tube insertion would be optional, recommended, or not recommended. Additional emphasis was placed on opportunities for quality improvement, particularly regarding shared decision making and care of children with existing tubes. ACTION STATEMENTS: The development group made a strong recommendation that clinicians should prescribe topical antibiotic eardrops only, without oral antibiotics, for children with uncomplicated acute tympanostomy tube otorrhea. The panel made recommendations that (1) clinicians should not perform tympanostomy tube insertion in children with a single episode of otitis media with effusion (OME) of less than 3 months' duration; (2) clinicians should obtain an age-appropriate hearing test if OME persists for 3 months or longer (chronic OME) or prior to surgery when a child becomes a candidate for tympanostomy tube insertion; (3) clinicians should offer bilateral tympanostomy tube insertion to children with bilateral OME for 3 months or longer (chronic OME) and documented hearing difficulties; (4) clinicians should reevaluate, at 3- to 6-month intervals, children with chronic OME who did not receive tympanostomy tubes until the effusion is no longer present, significant hearing loss is detected, or structural abnormalities of the tympanic membrane or middle ear are suspected; (5) clinicians should not perform tympanostomy tube insertion in children with recurrent acute otitis media (AOM) who do not have middle ear effusion in either ear at the time of assessment for tube candidacy; (6) clinicians should offer bilateral tympanostomy tube insertion to children with recurrent AOM who have unilateral or bilateral middle ear effusion at the time of assessment for tube candidacy; (7) clinicians should determine if a child with recurrent AOM or with OME of any duration is at increased risk for speech, language, or learning problems from otitis media because of baseline sensory, physical, cognitive, or behavioral factors; (8) in the perioperative period, clinicians should educate caregivers of children with tympanostomy tubes regarding the expected duration of tube function, recommended follow-up schedule, and detection of complications; (9) clinicians should not encourage routine, prophylactic water precautions (use of earplugs, headbands; avoidance of swimming or water sports) for children with tympanostomy tubes. The development group provided the following options: (1) clinicians may perform tympanostomy tube insertion in children with unilateral or bilateral OME for 3 months or longer (chronic OME) and symptoms that are likely attributable to OME including, but not limited to, vestibular problems, poor school performance, behavioral problems, ear discomfort, or reduced quality of life and (2) clinicians may perform tympanostomy tube insertion in at-risk children with unilateral or bilateral OME that is unlikely to resolve quickly as reflected by a type B (flat) tympanogram or persistence of effusion for 3 months or longer (chronic OME).

20 Guideline Supplement to the JCIH 2007 position statement: principles and guidelines for early intervention after confirmation that a child is deaf or hard of hearing. 2013

Anonymous7790753 / Muse, Carianne / Harrison, Judy / Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine / Grimes, Alison / Brookhouser, Patrick E / Epstein, Stephen / Buchman, Craig / Mehl, Albert / Vohr, Betty / Moeller, Mary Pat / Martin, Patti / Benedict, Beth S / Scoggins, Bobbie / Crace, Jodee / King, Michelle / Sette, Alice / Martin, Beth. · ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #23530178.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Guideline [Preventive activities among the elderly]. 2012

Herreros, Y Herreros / López-Torres Hidalgo, J D / de-Hoyos Alonso, M C / Díez, J M Baena / Gorroñogoitia Iturbe, A / Lesende, I Martín / Anonymous5740749. ·Grupo de Actividades Preventivas en los Mayores del PAPPS. ·Aten Primaria · Pubmed #23399508.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Guideline Sensorineural hearing loss: radiologic diagnosis. 2012

Anonymous1990740 / Anonymous2000740. · ·Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) · Pubmed #23090219.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Guideline Screening for hearing loss in older adults: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. 2012

Moyer, Virginia A / Anonymous1770734. ·U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, Rockville, MD, USA. ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #22893115.

ABSTRACT: DESCRIPTION: Update of the 1996 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for hearing impairment in older adults. METHODS: The USPSTF reviewed evidence published between 1950 and January 2010 on screening for age-related sensorineural hearing impairment in adults aged 50 years or older without diagnosed hearing loss in the primary care setting. POPULATION: This recommendation applies to asymptomatic adults aged 50 years or older. It does not apply to persons seeking evaluation for perceived hearing problems or for cognitive or affective symptoms that may be related to hearing loss. RECOMMENDATION: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for hearing loss in asymptomatic adults aged 50 years or older (I statement).

24 Guideline Clinical practice guideline: sudden hearing loss. 2012

Stachler, Robert J / Chandrasekhar, Sujana S / Archer, Sanford M / Rosenfeld, Richard M / Schwartz, Seth R / Barrs, David M / Brown, Steven R / Fife, Terry D / Ford, Peg / Ganiats, Theodore G / Hollingsworth, Deena B / Lewandowski, Christopher A / Montano, Joseph J / Saunders, James E / Tucci, Debara L / Valente, Michael / Warren, Barbara E / Yaremchuk, Kathleen L / Robertson, Peter J / Anonymous4970719. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 48202, USA. rstachl1@hfhs.org ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #22383545.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Sudden hearing loss (SHL) is a frightening symptom that often prompts an urgent or emergent visit to a physician. This guideline provides evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of patients who present with SHL. The guideline primarily focuses on sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) in adult patients (aged 18 and older). Prompt recognition and management of SSNHL may improve hearing recovery and patient quality of life (QOL). Sudden sensorineural hearing loss affects 5 to 20 per 100,000 population, with about 4000 new cases per year in the United States. This guideline is intended for all clinicians who diagnose or manage adult patients who present with SHL. PURPOSE: The purpose of this guideline is to provide clinicians with evidence-based recommendations in evaluating patients with SHL, with particular emphasis on managing SSNHL. The panel recognized that patients enter the health care system with SHL as a nonspecific, primary complaint. Therefore, the initial recommendations of the guideline deal with efficiently distinguishing SSNHL from other causes of SHL at the time of presentation. By focusing on opportunities for quality improvement, the guideline should improve diagnostic accuracy, facilitate prompt intervention, decrease variations in management, reduce unnecessary tests and imaging procedures, and improve hearing and rehabilitative outcomes for affected patients. RESULTS: The panel made strong recommendations that clinicians should (1) distinguish sensorineural hearing loss from conductive hearing loss in a patient presenting with SHL; (2) educate patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) about the natural history of the condition, the benefits and risks of medical interventions, and the limitations of existing evidence regarding efficacy; and (3) counsel patients with incomplete recovery of hearing about the possible benefits of amplification and hearing-assistive technology and other supportive measures. The panel made recommendations that clinicians should (1) assess patients with presumptive SSNHL for bilateral SHL, recurrent episodes of SHL, or focal neurologic findings; (2) diagnose presumptive ISSNHL if audiometry confirms a 30-dB hearing loss at 3 consecutive frequencies and an underlying condition cannot be identified by history and physical examination; (3) evaluate patients with ISSNHL for retrocochlear pathology by obtaining magnetic resonance imaging, auditory brainstem response, or audiometric follow-up; (4) offer intratympanic steroid perfusion when patients have incomplete recovery from ISSNHL after failure of initial management; and (5) obtain follow-up audiometric evaluation within 6 months of diagnosis for patients with ISSNHL. The panel offered as options that clinicians may offer (1) corticosteroids as initial therapy to patients with ISSNHL and (2) hyperbaric oxygen therapy within 3 months of diagnosis of ISSNHL. The panel made a recommendation against clinicians routinely prescribing antivirals, thrombolytics, vasodilators, vasoactive substances, or antioxidants to patients with ISSNHL. The panel made strong recommendations against clinicians (1) ordering computerized tomography of the head/brain in the initial evaluation of a patient with presumptive SSNHL and (2) obtaining routine laboratory tests in patients with ISSNHL.

25 Guideline Occupational noise-induced hearing loss: ACOEM Task Force on Occupational Hearing Loss. 2012

Anonymous4060713 / Kirchner, D Bruce / Evenson, Eric / Dobie, Robert A / Rabinowitz, Peter / Crawford, James / Kopke, Richard / Hudson, T Warner. · ·J Occup Environ Med · Pubmed #22183164.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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