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Gastrointestinal Tract HELP
Based on 100,000 articles published since 2010
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These are the 100000 published articles about Gastrointestinal Tract that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline [Essential and interpretation of Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum (JSCCR) guidelines 2019 for the treatment of colorectal cancer]. 2019

Sun, L Y. ·Department of Oncology, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150000, China. ·Zhonghua Wei Chang Wai Ke Za Zhi · Pubmed #31770843.

ABSTRACT: The Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum (JSCCR) published the guidelines 2019 for the treatment of colorectal cancer in March 2019. The new edition expanded the indications of endoscopic treatment, enriched the follow-up recommendations after endoscopic resection of early colorectal cancer, supplemented the indications of ISR and added the recommendations of lymph node recurrence and peritoneal recurrence. In the new edition, the adjuvant and palliative chemotherapy schemes were revised and patients with first-line chemotherapy were divided into three categories as follows: appropriate for intensive systemic therapy (fit), inappropriate for intensive systemic therapy (vulnerable), and inappropriate for systemic therapy (frail). The new edition of guidelines can also provide references to the doctors of colorectal cancer in our country. This article intends to interpret the essentials of this new edition.

2 Guideline [Updated German S3 guidelines on esophageal cancer and supplements from a surgical perspective]. 2019

Hölscher, A H / Gockel, I / Porschen, R. ·Contilia Zentrum für Speiseröhrenerkrankungen, Elisabeth Krankenhaus Essen, Essen, Deutschland. a.hoelscher@contilia.de. · Zentrum für Speiseröhren- und Magenchirurgie, Agaplesion Markus Krankenhaus Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Deutschland. a.hoelscher@contilia.de. · Klinik und Poliklinik für Viszeral‑, Transplantations‑, Thorax- und Gefäßchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Leipzig, Leipzig, Deutschland. · Klinik für Innere Medizin, Klinikum Bremen-Ost, Bremen, Deutschland. ·Chirurg · Pubmed #30976890.

ABSTRACT: The updated German S3 guidelines recommend transthoracic subtotal esophagectomy with 2‑field lymphadenectomy for surgical treatment of esophageal cancer in patients with squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric (AEG type I) junction of the middle and lower third. For AEG type III transhiatal extended total gastrectomy with distal esophageal resection is favored. Patients with AEG type II can be treated by both procedures under the prerequisite that an R0 resection can be achieved. A limited resection of the distal esophagus and the proximal stomach can only be considered in cT1 N0 M0 possibly cT2 AEG junction without an oncological risk constellation, i.e. grade G1/G2, intestinal type and no poorly cohesive carcinoma, because the rate of lymph node metastasis at the distal stomach is less than 2%. Minimally invasive procedures provide advantages compared to open esophagectomy due to the lower rate of postoperative total and especially pulmonary complications. This is true for hybrid esophagectomy (laparoscopy and thoracotomy) versus open access in cases of intrathoracic anastomoses and for total minimally invasive esophagectomy including robotic techniques versus open access in cervical esophagogastrostomy.

3 Guideline ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 210: Fecal Incontinence. 2019

Anonymous1191055. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30913197.

ABSTRACT: Fecal incontinence, or the involuntary leakage of solid or loose stool, is estimated to affect 7-15% of community-dwelling women (1). It is associated with reduced quality of life, negative psychologic effects, and social stigma (2), yet many women do not report their symptoms or seek treatment. Less than 3% of women who do self-report fecal incontinence will have this diagnosis recorded in their medical record (3). Obstetrician-gynecologists are in a unique position to identify women with fecal incontinence because pregnancy, childbirth, obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), and pelvic floor dysfunction are important risk factors that contribute to fecal incontinence in women. The purpose of this Practice Bulletin is to provide evidence-based guidelines on the screening, evaluation, and management of fecal incontinence to help obstetrician-gynecologists diagnose the condition and provide conservative treatment or referral for further work up and surgical management when appropriate. For discussion on fecal incontinence associated with OASIS, see Practice Bulletin No. 198, Prevention and Management of Obstetric Lacerations at Vaginal Delivery (4).

4 Guideline AGA Clinical Practice Update on Diagnosis and Monitoring of Celiac Disease-Changing Utility of Serology and Histologic Measures: Expert Review. 2019

Husby, Steffen / Murray, Joseph A / Katzka, David A. ·Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Electronic address: murray.joseph@mayo.edu. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #30578783.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The purpose of this clinical practice update is to define key modalities in the diagnosis and monitoring of celiac disease (CD) in adults as well as in children and adolescents. METHODS: The recommendations outlined in this expert review are based on available published evidence, including cohort and case-control studies of the diagnostic process as well as controlled and descriptive studies of disease management. Best Practice Advice 1: Serology is a crucial component of the detection and diagnosis of CD, particularly tissue transglutaminase-immunoglobulin A (TG2-IgA), IgA testing, and less frequently, endomysial IgA testing. Best Practice Advice 2: Thorough histological analysis of duodenal biopsies with Marsh classification, counting of lymphocytes per high-power field, and morphometry is important for diagnosis as well as for differential diagnosis. Best Practice Advice 2a: TG2-IgA, at high levels (> ×10 upper normal limit) is a reliable and accurate test for diagnosing active CD. When such a strongly positive TG2-IgA is combined with a positive endomysial antibody in a second blood sample, the positive predictive value for CD is virtually 100%. In adults, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and duodenal biopsies may then be performed for purposes of differential diagnosis. Best Practice Advice 3: IgA deficiency is an infrequent but important explanation for why patients with CD may be negative on IgA isotype testing despite strong suspicion. Measuring total IgA levels, IgG deamidated gliadin antibody tests, and TG2-IgG testing in that circumstance is recommended. Best Practice Advice 4: IgG isotype testing for TG2 antibody is not specific in the absence of IgA deficiency. Best Practice Advice 5: In patients found to have CD first by intestinal biopsies, celiac-specific serology should be undertaken as a confirmatory test before initiation of a gluten-free diet (GFD). Best Practice Advice 6: In patients in whom CD is strongly suspected in the face of negative biopsies, TG2-IgA should still be performed and, if positive, repeat biopsies might be considered either at that time or sometime in the future. Best Practice Advice 7: Reduction or avoidance of gluten before diagnostic testing is discouraged, as it may reduce the sensitivity of both serology and biopsy testing. Best Practice Advice 8: When patients have already started on a GFD before diagnosis, we suggest that the patient go back on a normal diet with 3 slices of wheat bread daily preferably for 1 to 3 months before repeat determination of TG2-IgA. Best Practice Advice 9: Determination of HLA-DQ2/DQ8 has a limited role in the diagnosis of CD. Its value is largely related to its negative predictive value to rule out CD in patients who are seronegative in the face of histologic changes, in patients who did not have serologic confirmation at the time of diagnosis, and in those patients with a historic diagnosis of CD; especially as very young children before the introduction of celiac-specific serology. MANAGEMENT: Best Practice Advice 10: Celiac serology has a guarded role in the detection of continued intestinal injury, in particular as to sensitivity, as negative serology in a treated patient does not guarantee that the intestinal mucosa has healed. Persistently positive serology usually indicates ongoing intestinal damage and gluten exposure. Follow-up serology should be performed 6 and 12 months after diagnosis, and yearly thereafter. Best Practice Advice 11: Patients with persistent or relapsing symptoms, without other obvious explanations for those symptoms, should undergo endoscopic biopsies to determine healing even in the presence of negative TG2-IgA.

5 Guideline Esophageal cancer practice guidelines 2017 edited by the Japan esophageal society: part 2. 2019

Kitagawa, Yuko / Uno, Takashi / Oyama, Tsuneo / Kato, Ken / Kato, Hiroyuki / Kawakubo, Hirofumi / Kawamura, Osamu / Kusano, Motoyasu / Kuwano, Hiroyuki / Takeuchi, Hiroya / Toh, Yasushi / Doki, Yuichiro / Naomoto, Yoshio / Nemoto, Kenji / Booka, Eisuke / Matsubara, Hisahiro / Miyazaki, Tatsuya / Muto, Manabu / Yanagisawa, Akio / Yoshida, Masahiro. ·Department of Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-8582, Japan. kitagawa@a3.keio.jp. · Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Saku Central Hospital, Nagano, Japan. · Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Gastrointestinal Tract Surgery, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-8582, Japan. · Department of Endoscopy and Endoscopic Surgery, Gunma University Hospital, Maebashi, Gunma, Japan. · Department of General Surgical Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, National Kyushu Cancer Center, Fukuoka, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan. · Department of General Surgery, Kawasaki Medical School, Okayama, Japan. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yonezawa, Japan. · Department of Frontier Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan. · Department of Clinical Oncology, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. · Department of Hemodialysis and Surgery, Chemotherapy Research Institute, International University of Health and Welfare, Ichikawa, Japan. ·Esophagus · Pubmed #30171414.

ABSTRACT:

6 Guideline ECCO-ESGAR Guideline for Diagnostic Assessment in IBD Part 2: IBD scores and general principles and technical aspects. 2019

Sturm, Andreas / Maaser, Christian / Calabrese, Emma / Annese, Vito / Fiorino, Gionata / Kucharzik, Torsten / Vavricka, Stephan R / Verstockt, Bram / van Rheenen, Patrick / Tolan, Damian / Taylor, Stuart A / Rimola, Jordi / Rieder, Florian / Limdi, Jimmy K / Laghi, Andrea / Krustiņš, Eduards / Kotze, Paulo G / Kopylov, Uri / Katsanos, Konstantinos / Halligan, Steve / Gordon, Hannah / González Lama, Yago / Ellul, Pierre / Eliakim, Rami / Castiglione, Fabiana / Burisch, Johan / Borralho Nunes, Paula / Bettenworth, Dominik / Baumgart, Daniel C / Stoker, Jaap / Anonymous3560959. ·Department of Gastroenterology, DRK Kliniken Berlin I Westend, Berlin, Germany. · Outpatients Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Lüneburg, Lüneburg, Germany. · Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome, Tor Vergata, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Valiant Clinic & American Hospital, Dubai, UAE. · Department of Gastroenterology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, Hospital Lüneburg, Lüneburg, Germany. · Gastroenterology and Hepatology Center, Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospitals Leuven and CHROMETA - Translational Research in Gastrointestinal Disorders, KU Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Clinical Radiology, St James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK. · Centre for Medical Imaging, University College London, London, UK. · Department of Radiology, Hospital Clínic Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, Digestive Diseases and Surgery Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust, Manchester; Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Department of Clinical and Surgical Translational Medicine, Sapienza - University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Pauls Stradins Clinical University Hospital, Riga, Latvia. · Colorectal Surgery Unit, Catholic University of Paraná PUCPR, Curitiba, Brazil. · Department of Gastroenterology, Sheba Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University and Medical School of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece. · Section of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Royal London Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Puerta De Hierro, Majadahonda Madrid, Spain. · Department of Medicine, Mater Dei Hospital, Msida, Malta. · Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, "Federico II" University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, North Zealand University Hospital; Center for Clinical Research and Prevention, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark. · Department of Anatomic Pathology, Hospital Cuf Descobertas; Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal. · Department of Medicine B, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. · Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center AMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #30137278.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Guideline [Perineal tears and episiotomy: Surgical procedure - CNGOF perineal prevention and protection in obstetrics guidelines]. 2018

Marty, N / Verspyck, E. ·Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU Charles-Nicolle, 1, rue de Germont, 76031 Rouen cedex, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU Charles-Nicolle, 1, rue de Germont, 76031 Rouen cedex, France. Electronic address: eric.verspyck@chu-rouen.fr. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #30392991.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To recommend the episiotomy procedure, repair of perineal or vaginal tears and episiotomy. METHODS: Published Literature was retrieved using PubMed and Cochrane Library computer databases up to May 2018 and recommendations issued from international societies. RESULTS: A midline episiotomy increases the risk of OASIS compared with a mediolateral procedure (LE2). OASIS rates are similar for mediolateral and lateral episiotomies (LE1). A scar angle of at least 45° (measured in relation to the midline after suturing) is associated with a lower risk of OASIS (LE3). To obtain this final angle, the episiotomy must be performed at a 60° angle (LE1). Current data are insufficient to recommend the length, the timing, and the modalities procedure during instrumental delivery for mediolateral episiotomy. Suturing the superficial plane of a perineal tear provides no benefits when the edges touch and do not bleed (LE2). The techniques for suturing perineal lacerations by continuous sutures are associated with a reduction in immediate pain, reduced use of analgesics, and less frequent removal of stitches, compared with interrupted stitches (LE1). Synthetic suture materials with either standard or rapid absorption provide similar results for perineal pain and women's satisfaction: rapid absorption polyglactin has the advantage of a reduced need for later stitch removal, but it increases the risk of scar dehiscence (LE1). There are not enough published studies to recommend the use of biological glues in the repair of first-degree perineal tears or skin in second-degree tears. Delaying repair of OASIS for several hours does not aggravate the subsequent prognosis for anal continence (LE1). Internal sphincter injury lead to significant further anal incontinence (LE3). There is no study comparing methods for internal sphincter repair. To repair the external sphincter, overlap and end-to-end suture techniques yield similar results for anal continence (LE2). Use of polydioxanone 3/0 or polyglactin 2/0 to repair the EAS produces similar results for perineal pain and anal incontinence scores (LE2) CONCLUSIONS: A mediolateral incision is recommended for an episiotomy (Grade B). The angle of incision recommended for a mediolateral episiotomy is 60° (GradeC). It is recommended that continuous running sutures be preferred for the repair of episiotomies and second-degree tears (Grade A). It is recommended that obstetrics professionals optimise surgical conditions to the extent possible for repair of OASIS (professional consensus); a detailed report of the extent of the injuries, the techniques of repair, and the material used is recommended (GradeC). The external anal sphincter can be repaired with either overlap or end-to-end suture techniques (Grade B).

8 Guideline [Perineal prevention and protection in obstetrics: CNGOF Clinical Practice Guidelines (short version)]. 2018

Ducarme, G / Pizzoferrato, A C / de Tayrac, R / Schantz, C / Thubert, T / Le Ray, C / Riethmuller, D / Verspyck, E / Gachon, B / Pierre, F / Artzner, F / Jacquetin, B / Fritel, X. ·Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, centre hospitalier départemental Vendée, boulevard Stéphane-Moreau, 85000 La Roche-sur-Yon, France. Electronic address: g.ducarme@gmail.com. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU Caen, avenue de la Côte-de-Nacre, 14033 Caen cedex, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU Carémeau, place du Pr-Debré, 30900 Nîmes, France. · Centre population et développement (Ceped), institut de la recherche et du développement (IRD), université Paris Descartes, Inserm, Commission scientifique du Collège national des sages-femmes (CNSF), 75000 Paris, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU Hôtel-Dieu, hôpitaux de Nantes, université de Nantes, 38, boulevard Jean-Monnet, 44000 Nantes, France; GMC-UPMC 01, GREEN (Groupe de recherche clinique en neurourologie), 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France. · Maternité Port-Royal, hôpital Cochin, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, 123, boulevard de Port-Royal, 75014 Paris, France; Inserm U1153, épidémiologie obstétricale, périnatale et pédiatrique (équipe EPOPé), centre de recherche en épidémiologie et statistiques Sorbonne Paris cité (CRESS), DHU risques et grossesse, université Paris Descartes, 75014 Paris, France. · Pôle Mère-Femme, CHRU Besançon, 3, boulevard Fleming, 25000 Besançon, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU Charles-Nicolle, 1, rue de Germont, 76000 Rouen, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, CHU de Poitiers, université de Poitiers, 2, rue de la Milétrie, 86021 Poitiers, France. · Collectif inter-associatif autour de la naissance (CIANE), 40, rue de Chanzy, 75011 Paris, France. · Pôle Femme-Enfant, CHU Estaing, 1, place Lucie-Aubrac, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand, France. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #30391283.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The objective of these clinical practice guidelines was to analyse all of the interventions during pregnancy and childbirth that might prevent obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) and postnatal pelvic floor symptoms. MATERIAL AND METHODS: These guidelines were developed in accordance with the methods prescribed by the French Health Authority (HAS). RESULTS: A prenatal clinical examination of the perineum is recommended for women with a history of Crohn's disease, OASIS, genital mutilation, or perianal lesions (professional consensus). Just after delivery, a perineal examination is recommended to check for OASIS (Grade B); if there is doubt about the diagnosis, a second opinion should be requested (GradeC). In case of OASIS, the injuries (including their severity) and the technique for their repair should be described in detail (GradeC). Perineal massage during pregnancy must be encouraged among women who want it (Grade B). No intervention conducted before the start of the active phase of the second stage of labour has been shown to be effective in reducing the risk of perineal injury. The crowning of the baby's head should be manually controlled and the posterior perineum manually supported to reduce the risk of OASIS (GradeC). The performance of an episiotomy during normal deliveries is not recommended to reduce the risk of OASIS (Grade A). In instrumental deliveries, episiotomy may be indicated to avoid OASIS (GradeC). When an episiotomy is performed, a mediolateral incision is recommended (Grade B). The indication for episiotomy should be explained to the woman, and she should consent before its performance. Advising women to have a caesarean delivery for primary prevention of postnatal urinary or anal incontinence is not recommended (Grade B). During pregnancy and again in the labour room, obstetrics professionals should focus on the woman's expectations and inform her about the modes of delivery.

9 Guideline [Definition, epidemiology and risk factors of obstetric anal sphincter injuries: CNGOF Perineal Prevention and Protection in Obstetrics Guidelines]. 2018

Thubert, T / Cardaillac, C / Fritel, X / Winer, N / Dochez, V. ·Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, hôpitaux de Nantes, CHU Hôtel-Dieu, 38, boulevard Jean-Monnet, 44000 Nantes, France; Université de Nantes, 1, rue Gaston-Veil, 44000 Nantes, France; GMC-UPMC 01, GREEN (Groupe de recherche clinique en neurourologie), 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France. Electronic address: thibault.thubert@chu-nantes.fr. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, hôpitaux de Nantes, CHU Hôtel-Dieu, 38, boulevard Jean-Monnet, 44000 Nantes, France; Université de Nantes, 1, rue Gaston-Veil, 44000 Nantes, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU de Poitiers, 2, rue de la Milétrie, 86021 Poitiers, France. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #30385355.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review was to agree on a definition of the obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), to determine the prevalence and risk factors. METHODS: A comprehensive review of the literature on the obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), establishment of levels of evidence (NP), and grades of recommendation according to the methodology of the recommendations for clinical practice. RESULTS: To classify obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), we have used the WHO-RCOG classification, which lists 4 degrees of severity. To designate obstetric anal sphincter injuries, we have used the acronym OASIS, rather than the standard French terms of "complete perineum" and "complicated complete perineum". OASIS with only isolated involvement of the EAS (3a and 3b) appears to have a better functional prognosis than OASIS affecting the IAS or the anorectal mucosa (3c and 4) (LE3). The prevalence of women with ano-rectal symptoms increases with the severity of the OASIS (LE3). In the long term, 35-60% of women who had an OASIS have anal or fecal incontinence (LE3). The prevalence of an OASI in the general population is between 0.25 to 6%. The prevalence of OASIS in primiparous women is between 1.4 and 16% and thus, should be considered more important than among the multiparous women (0.4 to 2.7%). In women with a history of previous OASIS, the risk of occurrence is higher and varies between 5.1 and 10.7% following childbirth. The priority in this context remains the training of childbirth professionals (midwives and obstetricians) to detect these injuries in the delivery room, immediately after the birth. The training and awareness of these practitioners of OASIS diagnosis improves its detection in the delivery room (LE2). Professional experience is associated with better detection of OASIS (LE3) (4). Continuing professional education of obstetrics professionals in the diagnosis and repair of OASIS must be encouraged (Grade C). In the case of second-degree perineal tear, the use of ultrasound in the delivery room improves the diagnosis of OASIS (LE2). Ultrasound decreases the prevalence of symptoms of severe anal incontinence at 1 year (LE2). The diagnosis of OASIS is improved by the use of endo-anal ultrasonography in post-partum (72h-6weeks) (LE2). The principal factors associated with OASIS are nulliparity and instrumental (vaginal operative) delivery; the others are advanced maternal age, history of OASIS, macrosomia, midline episiotomy, posterior cephalic positions, and long labour (LE2). The presence of a perianal lesion (perianal fissure, or anorectal or rectovaginal fistula) is associated with an increased risk of 4th degree lacerations (LE3). Crohn's disease without perianal involvement is not associated with an excess risk of OASIS (LE3). For women with type III genital mutilation, deinfibulation before delivery is associated with a reduction in the risk of OASIS (LE3); in this situation, deinfibulation is recommended before delivery (grade C). CONCLUSION: It is necessary to use a consensus definition of the OASIS to be able to better detect and treat them.

10 Guideline [Cesarean section and perineal protection: CNGOF Perineal Prevention and Protection in Obstetrics Guidelines]. 2018

Gachon, B. ·Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, CHU de Poitiers, université de Poitiers, 2, rue de la Milétrie, 86000 Poitiers, France. Electronic address: bertrand.gachon@chu-poitiers.fr. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #30377093.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The endpoint was to assess the interest of planned cesarean section in primary and secondary obstetrical perineal prevention. METHODS: This is a review of the literature about the impact of the mode of delivery in urinary incontinence (UI), anal incontinence (AI), pelvic organ prolapse (POP), sexual disorders de novo or prior to delivery and history of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASI). RESULTS: The studies about UI, AI and sexual disorders report a potential protective impact of cesarean section but with a possible selection bias and an inadequate comparability of the groups. Randomized trials do not report any protective effect of planned cesarean section for these 3 disorders. The literature about POP reports a higher risk for the women who delivered vaginally but still with a possible selection bias et there is no randomized trial for this outcome. About the secondary prevention of OASI, there is no evidence in the literature for a benefit of a systematic planned cesarean section for all women. For symptomatic women, the mode of delivery has to be discussed individually. In secondary prevention of UI, AI, POP and sexual disorders, there is no evidence in the literature for a benefit of planned cesarean section even if there is a history of surgical procedure for the disorder. CONCLUSION: Planned cesarean section is not recommended in order to prevent primary or secondary obstetrical perineal disorders except for symptomatic OASI for whom an individual discussion about the mode of delivery is recommended.

11 Guideline [Which interventions during labour to decrease the risk of perineal tears? CNGOF Perineal Prevention and Protection in Obstetrics Guidelines]. 2018

Le Ray, C / Pizzagalli, F. ·Maternité Port-Royal, hôpital Cochin, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, 123, boulevard de Port-Royal, 75014 Paris, France; Inserm U1153, épidémiologie obstétricale, périnatale et pédiatrique (équipe EPOPé), centre de recherche en épidémiologie et statistiques Sorbonne Paris Cité (CRESS), DHU risques et grossesse, université Paris Descartes, 75014 Paris, France. Electronic address: camille.le-ray@aphp.fr. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, CHU Antoine-Béclère, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, 157, rue de la Porte-de-Trivaux, 92140 Clamart, France. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #30377092.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review was to evaluate whether interventions performed during labour could influence the risk of perineal tears. METHODS: A separate keyword search for each medical intervention during labor was performed by selecting only studies evaluating perineal consequences, particularly the risk of obstetrical anal sphincter injury (LOSA). Interventions during pregnancy and during fetal expulsion have been specifically addressed in other chapters of the recommendations. RESULTS: Maternal mobilisation and postures during the first stage of labour have not been shown to reduce the risk of OASIS (LE3). No particular posture has demonstrated its superiority over any other during the second stage of labour for preventing obstetric perineal lesions including OASIS and postnatal incontinence (urinary or faecal) (LE2). There is no reason to recommend one maternal posture rather than another during the first and the second stages of labour for the purpose of reducing the risk of OASIS (Grade C). Women should be allowed to choose the position most comfortable for them during the first and second stages of labour (Professional consensus). Posterior cephalic positions present the greatest risks of perineal injury (LE2). Manual rotation of cephalic posterior positions to the anterior during the second stage of labour may make it possible to reduce the risk of operative vaginal delivery, although no reduction in the risk of perineal injuries or OASIS has been clearly demonstrated (LE3). For fetuses in posterior cephalic positions, no data justifies a preference for manual rotation at full dilation to diminish the risk of perineal injury (Professional consensus). Urinary catheterisation is recommended for women with epidural analgesia during labour when spontaneous micturition is not possible (Professional consensus). Although current data does not justify a preference for continuous or intermittent urinary catheterisation (LE2), intermittent catheterisation nonetheless appears preferable in this situation (Professional consensus). During the second stage phase, delayed pushing does not modify the risk of OASIS (LE1). It does, however, increase the chances of spontaneous delivery (LE1). It is thus recommended that, when maternal and fetal status allow it, the start of pushing should be delayed (Grade A). There is no evidence to support preferring one pushing technique rather than another to diminish the risk of OASIS (grade B). Performing an operative vaginal delivery for the sole purpose of reducing the duration of the second stage of labour may increase the risk of OASIS (LE3). Perineal massage or the application of warm compresses during the second stage of labour appear to reduce the risk of OASIS (LE2). However, we have not made a determination about their use in clinical practice.

12 Guideline AIUM-ACR-SPR-SRU Practice Parameter for the Performance and Interpretation of a Diagnostic Ultrasound Examination of the Extracranial Head and Neck. 2018

Anonymous7850964. · ·J Ultrasound Med · Pubmed #30308087.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Guideline The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Chronic Radiation Proctitis. 2018

Paquette, Ian M / Vogel, Jon D / Abbas, Maher A / Feingold, Daniel L / Steele, Scott R / Anonymous490961. ·University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio. · Anschutz Medical Campus, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, Colorado. · Al Zahra Hospital, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. · Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. ·Dis Colon Rectum · Pubmed #30192320.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Guideline The treatment of anal fistula: second ACPGBI Position Statement - 2018. 2018

Williams, G / Williams, A / Tozer, P / Phillips, R / Ahmad, A / Jayne, D / Maxwell-Armstrong, C. ·Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust, Wolverhampton, UK. · Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · St Mark's Hospital, Harrow, London, UK. · Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. · University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · National Institute for Health Research Nottingham Digestive Diseases Biomedical Research Unit, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. ·Colorectal Dis · Pubmed #30178915.

ABSTRACT: It is over 10 years since the first ACPGBI Position Statement on the management of anal fistula was published in 2007. This second edition is the result of scrutiny of the literature published during this time; it updates the original Position Statement and reviews the published evidence surrounding treatments for anal fistula that have been developed since the original publication.

15 Guideline Intestinal failure in adults: Recommendations from the ESPEN expert groups. 2018

Pironi, Loris / Corcos, Olivier / Forbes, Alastair / Holst, Mette / Joly, Francisca / Jonkers, Cora / Klek, Stanislaw / Lal, Simon / Blaser, Annika Reintam / Rollins, Katie E / Sasdelli, Anna S / Shaffer, Jon / Van Gossum, Andre / Wanten, Geert / Zanfi, Chiara / Lobo, Dileep N / Anonymous30530960. ·Center for Chronic Intestinal Failure, Department of Digestive System, St. Orsola Hospital, University of Bologna, Italy. Electronic address: loris.pironi@unibo.it. · Intestinal Stroke Center (SURVI)/ Gastroenterology, IBD and Nutrition Support Department, Beaujon Hospital, and Laboratory for Vascular Translational Science UMR 1148, University Paris VII, France. · Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Bob Champion Building, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7UQ, UK. · Center for Nutrition and Bowel Disease, Department of Gastroenterology, Aalborg University Hospital and Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Denmark. · Gastroenterology, IBD and Nutrition Support Department, Beaujon Hospital, and Gastrointestinal and Metabolic Dysfunctions in Nutritional Pathologies UMR 1149, University Paris VII, France. · Amsterdam University Medical Center, Location AMC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Stanley Dudrick's Memorial Hospital, General Surgery Unit with Intestinal Failure Center, Skawina, Poland. · Intestinal Failure Unit, Salford Royal & Manchester University, Manchester, UK. · Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia; Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Lucerne, Switzerland. · Gastrointestinal Surgery, Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals and University of Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK. · Center for Chronic Intestinal Failure, Department of Digestive System, St. Orsola Hospital, University of Bologna, Italy. · Clinic of Intestinal Diseases and Nutritional Support, Hopital Erasme, Free University of Brussels, Brussels, Belgium. · Intestinal Failure Unit, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Organ Failure and Transplantation, Sant'Orsola Hospital, University of Bologna, Italy. ·Clin Nutr · Pubmed #30172658.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Intestinal failure (IF) is defined as "the reduction of gut function below the minimum necessary for the absorption of macronutrients and/or water and electrolytes, such that intravenous supplementation is required to maintain health and/or growth". Functionally, it may be classified as type I acute intestinal failure (AIF), type II prolonged AIF and type III chronic intestinal failure (CIF) The ESPEN Workshop on IF was held in Bologna, Italy, on 15-16 October 2017 and the aims of this document were to highlight the current state of the art and future directions for research in IF. METHODS: This paper represents the opinion of experts in the field, based on current evidence. It is not a formal review, but encompasses the current evidence, with emphasis on epidemiology, classification, diagnosis and management. RESULTS: IF is the rarest form of organ failure and can result from a variety of conditions that affect gastrointestinal anatomy and function adversely. Assessment, diagnosis, and short and long-term management involves a multidisciplinary team with diverse expertise in the field that aims to reduce complications, increase life expectancy and improve quality of life in patients. CONCLUSIONS: Both AIF and CIF are relatively rare conditions and most of the published work presents evidence from small, single-centre studies. Much remains to be investigated to improve the diagnosis and management of IF and future studies should rely on multidisciplinary, multicentre and multinational collaborations that gather data from large cohorts of patients. Emphasis should also be placed on partnership with patients, carers and government agencies in order to improve the quality of research that focuses on patient-centred outcomes that will help to improve both outcomes and quality of life in patients with this devastating condition.

16 Guideline The use of faecal microbiota transplant as treatment for recurrent or refractory 2018

Mullish, Benjamin H / Quraishi, Mohammed Nabil / Segal, Jonathan P / McCune, Victoria L / Baxter, Melissa / Marsden, Gemma L / Moore, David J / Colville, Alaric / Bhala, Neeraj / Iqbal, Tariq H / Settle, Christopher / Kontkowski, Graziella / Hart, Ailsa L / Hawkey, Peter M / Goldenberg, Simon D / Williams, Horace R T. ·Division of Integrative Systems Medicine and Digestive Disease, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Departments of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK. · Inflammatory Bowel Disease Unit, St Mark's Hospital, London, UK. · Public Health England, Public Health Laboratory Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Institute of Microbiology and Infection, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Department of Microbiology, Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust, Exeter, UK. · Healthcare Infection Society, London, UK. · Institute of Applied Health Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Department of Microbiology, City Hospitals Sunderland NHS Foundation Trust, Sunderland, Sunderland, UK. · C diff Support, London, UK. · Centre for Clinical Infection and Diagnostics Research, King's College London, London, UK. · Department of Microbiology, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. ·Gut · Pubmed #30154172.

ABSTRACT: Interest in the therapeutic potential of faecal microbiota transplant (FMT) has been increasing globally in recent years, particularly as a result of randomised studies in which it has been used as an intervention. The main focus of these studies has been the treatment of recurrent or refractory

17 Guideline ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 198: Prevention and Management of Obstetric Lacerations at Vaginal Delivery. 2018

Anonymous2580959. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30134424.

ABSTRACT: Lacerations are common after vaginal birth. Trauma can occur on the cervix, vagina, and vulva, including the labial, periclitoral, and periurethral regions, and the perineum. Most of these lacerations do not result in adverse functional outcomes. Severe perineal lacerations, extending into or through the anal sphincter complex, although less frequent, are more commonly associated with increased risk of pelvic floor injury, fecal and urinary incontinence, pain, and sexual dysfunction with symptoms that may persist or be present many years after giving birth. The purpose of this document is to provide evidence-based guidelines for the prevention, identification, and repair of obstetric lacerations and for episiotomy.

18 Guideline ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 198 Summary: Prevention and Management of Obstetric Lacerations at Vaginal Delivery. 2018

Anonymous2520959. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30134417.

ABSTRACT: Lacerations are common after vaginal birth. Trauma can occur on the cervix, vagina, and vulva, including the labial, periclitoral, and periurethral regions, and the perineum. Most of these lacerations do not result in adverse functional outcomes. Severe perineal lacerations, extending into or through the anal sphincter complex, although less frequent, are more commonly associated with increased risk of pelvic floor injury, fecal and urinary incontinence, pain, and sexual dysfunction with symptoms that may persist or be present many years after giving birth. The purpose of this document is to provide evidence-based guidelines for the prevention, identification, and repair of obstetric lacerations and for episiotomy.

19 Guideline Management of patients with rectal prolapse: the 2017 Dutch guidelines. 2018

van der Schans, E M / Paulides, T J C / Wijffels, N A / Consten, E C J. ·Department of Surgery, Meander Medical Centre, Maatweg 3, 3813 TZ, Amersfoort, The Netherlands. EM.vander.Schans@meandermc.nl. · Department of Surgery, Meander Medical Centre, Maatweg 3, 3813 TZ, Amersfoort, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, St. Antonius Hospital, Koekoekslaan 1, 3435 CM, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands. ·Tech Coloproctol · Pubmed #30099626.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Rectal prolapse-both external rectal prolapse and internal rectal prolapse-is a disabling condition. In view of the overwhelming number of surgical procedures described for the treatment of rectal prolapse, a comprehensive update concerning the diagnostic and therapeutic pathway for this condition is required to draw recommendations for clinical practice. This initiative was commissioned by the Dutch Association for Surgery (Nederlandse Vereniging voor Heelkunde) as a multidisciplinary collaboration. METHODS: Nine questions outlining the diagnostic approach, conservative and surgical management of rectal prolapse were selected. A systematic literature search for evidence was then conducted in the Medline and Embase databases. RESULTS: Recommendations included diagnostic approach, methods to assess complaints of fecal incontinence and/or obstructive defecation and treatment options, both conservative and surgical. A level of evidence was assigned to each statement following the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines for clinical practice are useful in the diagnosis and treatment of rectal prolapse. There are many statements requiring a higher level of evidence due to a lack of studies.

20 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines for peroral endoscopic myotomy. 2018

Inoue, Haruhiro / Shiwaku, Hironari / Iwakiri, Katsuhiko / Onimaru, Manabu / Kobayashi, Yasutoshi / Minami, Hitomi / Sato, Hiroki / Kitano, Seigo / Iwakiri, Ryuichi / Omura, Nobuo / Murakami, Kazunari / Fukami, Norio / Fujimoto, Kazuma / Tajiri, Hisao. ·Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society, Tokyo, Japan. ·Dig Endosc · Pubmed #30022514.

ABSTRACT: Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a novel clinical technique developed in Japan used to treat esophageal achalasia and esophageal motility disorders. This technique has been rapidly accepted and widely disseminated throughout our clinical practice because of its low invasiveness, technical novelty, and high efficacy. Since the advent of POEM, there have been no clinical guidelines that clearly indicated its standard of care, and these guidelines have been anticipated both nationally and internationally by clinicians who engage in POEM practice. In 2017, to meet these needs, the Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society (JGES) launched the guideline committee for POEM. Based on the guideline development process proposed by the Medical Information Network Distribution Service (MINDS), the guideline committee initially created research questions on POEM and conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis on each topic. The clinical research extracted from databases for these clinical questions and the systematic review mainly comprised a few retrospective studies with a small number of participants and short trial periods; hence, the strength of the evidence and recommendations derived from these results was low. Throughout this process, the guideline committee met thrice: once on May 13, 2017, and again on September 17, 2017, to formulate the draft. A consensus meeting was then held on January 14, 2018, in Tokyo to establish the guideline statements and finalize the recommendations using the modified Delphi method. This manuscript presents clinical guidelines regarding current standards of practice and recommendations in terms of the nine chief topics in POEM.

21 Guideline Rectal Cancer, Version 2.2018, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2018

Benson, Al B / Venook, Alan P / Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M / Cederquist, Lynette / Chen, Yi-Jen / Ciombor, Kristen K / Cohen, Stacey / Cooper, Harry S / Deming, Dustin / Engstrom, Paul F / Grem, Jean L / Grothey, Axel / Hochster, Howard S / Hoffe, Sarah / Hunt, Steven / Kamel, Ahmed / Kirilcuk, Natalie / Krishnamurthi, Smitha / Messersmith, Wells A / Meyerhardt, Jeffrey / Mulcahy, Mary F / Murphy, James D / Nurkin, Steven / Saltz, Leonard / Sharma, Sunil / Shibata, David / Skibber, John M / Sofocleous, Constantinos T / Stoffel, Elena M / Stotsky-Himelfarb, Eden / Willett, Christopher G / Wuthrick, Evan / Gregory, Kristina M / Gurski, Lisa / Freedman-Cass, Deborah A. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #30006429.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Rectal Cancer address diagnosis, staging, surgical management, perioperative treatment, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, disease surveillance, and survivorship in patients with rectal cancer. This portion of the guidelines focuses on the management of localized disease, which involves careful patient selection for curative-intent treatment options that sequence multimodality therapy usually comprised of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgical resection.

22 Guideline Anal Carcinoma, Version 2.2018, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2018

Benson, Al B / Venook, Alan P / Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M / Cederquist, Lynette / Chen, Yi-Jen / Ciombor, Kristen K / Cohen, Stacey / Cooper, Harry S / Deming, Dustin / Engstrom, Paul F / Grem, Jean L / Grothey, Axel / Hochster, Howard S / Hoffe, Sarah / Hunt, Steven / Kamel, Ahmed / Kirilcuk, Natalie / Krishnamurthi, Smitha / Messersmith, Wells A / Meyerhardt, Jeffrey / Mulcahy, Mary F / Murphy, James D / Nurkin, Steven / Saltz, Leonard / Sharma, Sunil / Shibata, David / Skibber, John M / Sofocleous, Constantinos T / Stoffel, Elena M / Stotsky-Himelfarb, Eden / Willett, Christopher G / Wuthrick, Evan / Gregory, Kristina M / Freedman-Cass, Deborah A. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #30006428.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Anal Carcinoma provide recommendations for the management of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal or perianal region. Primary treatment of anal cancer usually includes chemoradiation, although certain lesions can be treated with margin-negative local excision alone. Disease surveillance is recommended for all patients with anal carcinoma because additional curative-intent treatment is possible. A multidisciplinary approach including physicians from gastroenterology, medical oncology, surgical oncology, radiation oncology, and radiology is essential for optimal patient care.

23 Guideline Japanese clinical practice guidelines for allied disorders of Hirschsprung's disease, 2017. 2018

Muto, Mitsuru / Matsufuji, Hiroshi / Taguchi, Tomoaki / Tomomasa, Takeshi / Nio, Masaki / Tamai, Hiroshi / Tamura, Masanori / Sago, Haruhiko / Toki, Akira / Nosaka, Shunsuke / Kuroda, Tatsuo / Yoshida, Masahiro / Nakajima, Atsushi / Kobayashi, Hiroyuki / Sou, Hideki / Masumoto, Kouji / Watanabe, Yoshio / Kanamori, Yutaka / Hamada, Yoshinori / Yamataka, Atsuyuki / Shimojima, Naoki / Kubota, Akio / Ushijima, Kosuke / Haruma, Ken / Fukudo, Shin / Araki, Yuko / Kudo, Takahiro / Obata, Satoshi / Sumita, Wataru / Watanabe, Toshihiko / Fukahori, Suguru / Fujii, Yoshimitsu / Yamada, Yoshiyuki / Jimbo, Keisuke / Kawai, Fujimi / Fukuoka, Tomoya / Onuma, Shinsuke / Morizane, Toshio / Ieiri, Satoshi / Esumi, Genshiro / Jimbo, Takahiro / Yamasaki, Tomoko. ·The guideline establishment group for allied disorders of Hirschsprung's disease, Science Research, Ministry of Health Labour and Welfare, Fukuoka, Japan. ·Pediatr Int · Pubmed #29878629.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Despite the presence of ganglion cells in the rectum, some patients have symptoms similar to those of Hirschsprung's disease. A consensus has yet to be established regarding the terminology for these diseases. We defined this group of diseases as "allied disorders of Hirschsprung's disease" and compiled these guidelines to facilitate accurate clinician diagnosis and provide appropriate treatment strategies for each disease. METHODS: These guidelines were developed using the methodologies in the Medical Information Network Distribution System (MINDS). Of seven allied disorders, isolated hypoganglionosis; megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome; and chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction were selected as targets of clinical questions (CQ). In a comprehensive search of the Japanese- and English-language articles in PubMed and Ichu-Shi Web, 836 pieces of evidence related to the CQ were extracted from 288 articles; these pieces of evidence were summarized in an evidence table. RESULTS: We herein outline the newly established Japanese clinical practice guidelines for allied disorders of Hirschsprung's disease. Given that the target diseases are rare and intractable, most evidence was drawn from case reports and case series. In the CQ, the diagnosis, medication, nutritional support, surgical therapy, and prognosis for each disease are given. We emphasize the importance of full-thickness intestinal biopsy specimens for the histopathological evaluation of enteric ganglia. Considering the practicality of the guidelines, the recommendations for each CQ were created with protracted discussions among specialists. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical practice recommendations for allied disorders of Hirschprung's disease are given for each CQ, along with an assessment of the current evidence. We hope that the information will be helpful in daily practice and future studies.

24 Guideline Gastrointestinal stromal tumours: ESMO-EURACAN Clinical Practice Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. 2018

Casali, P G / Abecassis, N / Aro, H T / Bauer, S / Biagini, R / Bielack, S / Bonvalot, S / Boukovinas, I / Bovee, J V M G / Brodowicz, T / Broto, J M / Buonadonna, A / De Álava, E / Dei Tos, A P / Del Muro, X G / Dileo, P / Eriksson, M / Fedenko, A / Ferraresi, V / Ferrari, A / Ferrari, S / Frezza, A M / Gasperoni, S / Gelderblom, H / Gil, T / Grignani, G / Gronchi, A / Haas, R L / Hassan, B / Hohenberger, P / Issels, R / Joensuu, H / Jones, R L / Judson, I / Jutte, P / Kaal, S / Kasper, B / Kopeckova, K / Krákorová, D A / Le Cesne, A / Lugowska, I / Merimsky, O / Montemurro, M / Pantaleo, M A / Piana, R / Picci, P / Piperno-Neumann, S / Pousa, A L / Reichardt, P / Robinson, M H / Rutkowski, P / Safwat, A A / Schöffski, P / Sleijfer, S / Stacchiotti, S / Sundby Hall, K / Unk, M / Van Coevorden, F / van der Graaf, W T A / Whelan, J / Wardelmann, E / Zaikova, O / Blay, J Y / Anonymous185160949. ·Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori and University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Instituto Portugues de Oncologia de Lisboa Francisco Gentil, EPE, Lisbon, Portugal. · Turku University Hospital (Turun Yliopistollinen Keskussairaala), Turlu, Finland. · University Hospital Essen, Essen Germany. · Department of Oncological Orthopedics, Musculoskeletal Tissue Bank, IFO, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy. · Klinikum Stuttgart-Olgahospital, Stuttgart, Germany. · Institut Curie, Paris, France. · NORDIX, Athens, Greece. · Department of Pathology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Vienna General Hospital (AKH), Medizinische Universität Wien, Vienna, Austria. · Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio-CIBERONC, Seville, Spain. · Centro di Riferimento Oncologico di Aviano, Aviano. · Ospedale Regionale di Treviso 'S.Maria di Cà Foncello', Treviso, Italy. · Integrated Unit ICO Hospitalet, HUB, Barcelona, Spain. · Sarcoma Unit, University College London Hospitals, London, UK. · Skane University Hospital-Lund, Lund, Sweden. · N. N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center, Moscow, Russian Federation. · Institute of Scientific Hospital Care (IRCCS), Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome. · Pediatric Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan. · Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna. · Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi Firenze, Florence, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels, Belgium. · Candiolo Cancer Institute, FPO IRCCS, Candiolo, Italy. · Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam and Department of Radiotherapy, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK. · Mannheim University Medical Center, Mannheim. · Department of Medicine III, University Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich, Germany. · Helsinki University Central Hospital (HUCH), Helsinki, Finland. · Royal Marsden Hospital, London. · The Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK. · University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen. · Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · University Hospital Motol, Prague. · Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Brno, Czech Republic. · Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus, Villejuif, France. · Maria Sklodowska Curie Institute, Oncology Centre, Warsaw, Poland. · Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center (Ichilov), Tel Aviv, Israel. · Medical Oncology, University Hospital of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Azienda Ospedaliera, Universitaria, Policlinico S Orsola-Malpighi Università di Bologna, Bologna. · Azienda Ospedaliero, Universitaria Cita della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Turin, Italy. · Fundacio de Gestio Sanitaria de L'hospital de la Santa Creu I Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain. · Helios Klinikum Berlin Buch, Berlin, Germany. · YCRC Department of Clinical Oncology, Weston Park Hospital NHS Trust, Sheffield, UK. · Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Finland. · Leuven Cancer Institute, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Medical Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Fondazione Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Institute of Oncology of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Netherlands Cancer Institute Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · University College Hospital, London, UK. · Gerhard-Domagk-Institut für Pathologie, Universitätsklinikum Münster, Münster, Germany. · Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Centre Leon Bernard and UCBL1, Lyon, France. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #29846513.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Guideline EFSUMB Recommendations and Clinical Guidelines for Intestinal Ultrasound (GIUS) in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. 2018

Maconi, Giovanni / Nylund, Kim / Ripolles, Tomas / Calabrese, Emma / Dirks, Klaus / Dietrich, Christoph F / Hollerweger, Alois / Sporea, Ioan / Saftoiu, Adrian / Maaser, Christian / Hausken, Trygve / Higginson, Antony P / Nürnberg, Dieter / Pallotta, Nadia / Romanini, Laura / Serra, Carla / Gilja, Odd Helge. ·Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, "L. Sacco" University Hospital, Milan, Italy. · National Centre for Ultrasound in Gastroenterology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Radiology, Hospital Universitario Doctor Peset, Valencia, Spain. · Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Roma, Italy. · Gastroenterologie und Innere Medizin, Rems-Murr-Klinikum Winnenden, Germany. · Innere Medizin 2, Caritas-Krankenhaus, Bad Mergentheim, Germany. · Department of Radiology, Hospital Barmherzige Brüder, Salzburg, Austria. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, "Victor Babes" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania. · Research Center of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Romania. · Ambulanzzentrum Gastroenterologie, Klinikum Lüneburg, Germany. · Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Radiology, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Portsmouth, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. · Gastroenterology, Ruppiner Kliniken, Neuruppin, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, Sapienza University of Rome, Roma, Italy. · Dept.of Radiology, Radiologia 1, Spedali Civili di Brescia, Italy. · Interventional Ultrasound Unit, Department of Organ Failure and Transplantations, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital and University of Bologna, Italy. · National Centre for Ultrasound in Gastroenterology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, and Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Norway. ·Ultraschall Med · Pubmed #29566419.

ABSTRACT: The accuracy and usefulness of gastrointestinal ultrasound (GIUS) for detecting activity and complications of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), has been reported in studies, promoting this technique as an important tool for the management of IBD patients. Whilst well recognised by international guidelines, standardization and general agreement in the definition of the luminal and extra-intestinal features, still need to be well defined.A task force group of 17 experts in GIUS faced this issue, by developing recommendations and clinical guidelines for the use of GIUS in IBD, under the auspices of EFSUMB. This article presents the consensus on the current data on sonographic features of IBD and summarises the accuracy of different sonographic modalities for the management of IBD patients.

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