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Epilepsy: HELP
Articles from University College London
Based on 1,238 articles published since 2010
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These are the 1238 published articles about Epilepsy that originated from University College London during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Practice guideline summary: Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy incidence rates and risk factors: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Epilepsy Society. 2017

Harden, Cynthia / Tomson, Torbjörn / Gloss, David / Buchhalter, Jeffrey / Cross, J Helen / Donner, Elizabeth / French, Jacqueline A / Gil-Nagel, Anthony / Hesdorffer, Dale C / Smithson, W Henry / Spitz, Mark C / Walczak, Thaddeus S / Sander, Josemir W / Ryvlin, Philippe. ·From the Department of Neurology (C.H.), Mount Sinai Health System, New York, NY · Department of Clinical Neuroscience (T.T.), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden · Department of Neurology (D.G.), CAMC Physicians, Charleston, WV · Departments of Pediatrics and Clinical Neurosciences (J.B.), Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Calgary, Canada · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Institute of Child Health (J.H.C.), and Institute of Neurology (J.W.S.), University College London · Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust (J.H.C.), London, UK · Department of Paediatrics (E.D.), Division of Neurology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Canada · Department of Neurology (J.A.F.), New York University Langone Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, New York · Department of Neurology (A.G.-N.), Hospital Ruber Internacional, Madrid, Spain · Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center and Department of Epidemiology (D.C.H.), Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY · Department of General Practice (W.H.S.), University College Cork, Ireland · Anschutz Outpatient Pavilion (M.C.S.), University of Colorado Health, Aurora · Neurology Clinic (T.S.W.), University of Minnesota, Minneapolis · Stichting Epilepsie Instellingen Nederland (SEIN) (J.W.S.), Heemstede, the Netherlands · and the Department of Clinical Neurosciences (P.R.), CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland. ·Neurology · Pubmed #28438841.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence rates of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) in different epilepsy populations and address the question of whether risk factors for SUDEP have been identified. METHODS: Systematic review of evidence; modified Grading Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation process for developing conclusions; recommendations developed by consensus. RESULTS: Findings for incidence rates based on 12 Class I studies include the following: SUDEP risk in children with epilepsy (aged 0-17 years) is 0.22/1,000 patient-years (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.16-0.31) (moderate confidence in evidence). SUDEP risk increases in adults to 1.2/1,000 patient-years (95% CI 0.64-2.32) (low confidence in evidence). The major risk factor for SUDEP is the occurrence of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS); the SUDEP risk increases in association with increasing frequency of GTCS occurrence (high confidence in evidence). RECOMMENDATIONS: Level B: Clinicians caring for young children with epilepsy should inform parents/guardians that in 1 year, SUDEP typically affects 1 in 4,500 children; therefore, 4,499 of 4,500 children will not be affected. Clinicians should inform adult patients with epilepsy that SUDEP typically affects 1 in 1,000 adults with epilepsy per year; therefore, annually 999 of 1,000 adults will not be affected. For persons with epilepsy who continue to experience GTCS, clinicians should continue to actively manage epilepsy therapies to reduce seizures and SUDEP risk while incorporating patient preferences and weighing the risks and benefits of any new approach. Clinicians should inform persons with epilepsy that seizure freedom, particularly freedom from GTCS, is strongly associated with decreased SUDEP risk.

2 Editorial Manual acupuncture for migraine. 2020

Angus-Leppan, Heather. ·Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London NW3 2QG, UK. ·BMJ · Pubmed #32213481.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Novel therapeutic targets in epilepsy: oxidative stress and iron metabolism. 2020

Li, Yao-Feng / Thom, Maria / Jacques, Thomas S. ·Pathology Department, Tri-Service General Hospital & National Defence Medical Centre, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC. · Department of Neuropathology, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK. · Developmental Biology and Cancer Research & Teaching Department, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, UK. · Departments of Histopathology, Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. ·Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol · Pubmed #32155661.

ABSTRACT: Malformations of Cortical Development (MCD) are one of the most frequent causes of multidrug-resistant focal epilepsy, of which focal cortical dysplasia type IIb (FCDIIb) and Tuberous Sclerosis.

4 Editorial Vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy. 2020

Duncan, John. ·Institute of Neurology, UCL, London, London, UK j.duncan@ucl.ac.uk. ·Pract Neurol · Pubmed #32054789.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Time to speed up the diagnosis of pre-eclampsia. 2019

Girling, Joanna. ·Department of Obstetric Medicine, West Middlesex University Hospital, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Joanna.Girling@chelwest.nhs.uk. ·Drug Ther Bull · Pubmed #31345955.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Post traumatic epilepsy: there is still much to learn. 2019

Mendonça, Guilherme S / Sander, Josemir W. ·Universidade Regional de Blumenau, Hospital Santa Isabel, Blumenau, SC, Brazil. · NIHR University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre, UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, London, United Kingdom. · Stichting Epilepsie Instellingen Nederland, Heemstede, Netherlands. ·Arq Neuropsiquiatr · Pubmed #31314837.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial A summary of data presented at the XIV conference on new antiepileptic drug and devices (EILAT XIV). 2019

Bialer, Meir / Johannessen, Svein I / Koepp, Matthias J / Levy, René H / Perucca, Emilio / Tomson, Torbjörn / White, H Steve. ·Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy and David R. Bloom Centre for Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel. Electronic address: meirb@ekmd.huji.ac.il. · The National Center for Epilepsy, Sandvika, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Department of Pharmacology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK. · Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Division of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology, Department of Internal Medicine and Therapeutics, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy; IRCCS Mondino Foundation, Pavia, Italy. · Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. ·Epilepsy Res · Pubmed #30910314.

ABSTRACT: The Fourteenth Eilat Conference on New Antiepileptic Drugs and Devices (EILAT XIV) took place in Madrid, Spain from May 13th to 16th 2018. Again, presentations on new medical devices and neuromodulation and discussions on device-related regulatory aspects were included in the programme. The virtual special issue on "neuromodulation" summarises the presentations focusing firstly, on the pre-clinical developments and the difficulties of clinical trial designs for neuromodulatory therapies, including vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) and Brain-Responsive Neurostimulation (RNS), and the use of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS) as a potential screening tool for determining the efficacy of neuromodulatory treatments in individual patients; secondly, on wearable devices for seizure monitoring through indices of peripheral sympathetic nervous activity, the use of such devices in combination with biofeedback for the treatment of epilepsy, and its potential for improving epilepsy specialist services, particularly in remote areas.

8 Editorial Pediatric epilepsy surgery: the earlier the better. 2018

Braun, Kees P J / Cross, J Helen. ·a Department of Child Neurology. Brain Center Rudolf Magnus , University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University , Utrecht , the Netherlands. · b Clinical Neurosciences Unit , UCL-Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health , London , UK. · c Young Epilepsy , Lingfield , UK. ·Expert Rev Neurother · Pubmed #29560752.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial New perspectives in epilepsy neuropathology. 2018

Thom, M. ·Department of Neuropathology, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, UK. ·Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol · Pubmed #29360171.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Neuropsychological assessment in epilepsy. 2018

Baxendale, Sallie. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, UCL Institute of Neurology, London WC1N 3BG, UK. ·Pract Neurol · Pubmed #29326240.

ABSTRACT: The role of the neuropsychological assessment in the management of people with epilepsy has evolved considerably over the past 25 years. This paper describes some of the most common applications of a neuropsychological assessment in the diagnosis, management and treatment of people with epilepsy. It describes the factors that influence the interpretation of neuropsychological test scores in this patient group and outlines the limitations of the investigation. It gives guidelines for the optimal timing of a referral, together with timelines and indications for reassessment, and provides a checklist to help the referring clinician get the most from a neuropsychological assessment for their patients with epilepsy.

11 Editorial Editorial. 2017

Walker, Matthew C. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK. ·Curr Opin Neurol · Pubmed #28212176.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Temporary replacements for oral epilepsy treatments. 2017

Sisodiya, Sanjay M. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, NIHR University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK s.sisodiya@ucl.ac.uk. ·Pract Neurol · Pubmed #28073924.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Genes cut across systems: Neurologists should think "heart" and cardiologists "brain". 2016

Nashef, Lina / Sander, Josemir W. ·From the Department of Neurology (L.N.), King's College Hospital · UCL Institute of Neurology (J.W.S.), London, UK · and Stichting Epilepsie Instellingen Nederland (SEIN) (J.W.S.), Heemstede, the Netherlands. ·Neurology · Pubmed #27466466.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Epilepsy and autism spectrum disorders: Relatively related. 2016

Scott, Rod C / Tuchman, Roberto. ·From the Department of Neurological Sciences (R.C.S.), University of Vermont, Burlington · Neurosciences Unit (R.C.S.), UCL Institute of Child Health, London, UK · and Department of Neurology (R.T.), Nicklaus Children's Hospital, Miami, FL. ·Neurology · Pubmed #27306638.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Making sense of ripples in generalized epilepsy. 2016

van Klink, N E C / Bauer, P R / Zijlmans, M. ·Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Stichting Epilepsie Instellingen Nederland (SEIN), Heemstede, The Netherlands; NIHR University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, United Kingdom. · Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands; Stichting Epilepsie Instellingen Nederland (SEIN), Heemstede, The Netherlands. Electronic address: g.j.m.zijlmans@umcutrecht.nl. ·Clin Neurophysiol · Pubmed #26777056.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Cortical drive of low-frequency oscillations in the human nucleus accumbens during action selection. 2015

Stenner, Max-Philipp / Litvak, Vladimir / Rutledge, Robb B / Zaehle, Tino / Schmitt, Friedhelm C / Voges, Jürgen / Heinze, Hans-Jochen / Dolan, Raymond J. ·Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London, United Kingdom; Department of Neurology, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany; max-philipp.stenner@med.ovgu.de. · Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London, United Kingdom; · Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London, United Kingdom; Max Planck University College London Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Neurology, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany; · Department of Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany; Department of Behavioral Neurology, Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Magdeburg, Germany; and. · Department of Neurology, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany; Department of Behavioral Neurology, Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Magdeburg, Germany; and. ·J Neurophysiol · Pubmed #25878159.

ABSTRACT: The nucleus accumbens is thought to contribute to action selection by integrating behaviorally relevant information from multiple regions, including prefrontal cortex. Studies in rodents suggest that information flow to the nucleus accumbens may be regulated via task-dependent oscillatory coupling between regions. During instrumental behavior, local field potentials (LFP) in the rat nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex are coupled at delta frequencies (Gruber AJ, Hussain RJ, O'Donnell P. PLoS One 4: e5062, 2009), possibly mediating suppression of afferent input from other areas and thereby supporting cortical control (Calhoon GG, O'Donnell P. Neuron 78: 181-190, 2013). In this report, we demonstrate low-frequency cortico-accumbens coupling in humans, both at rest and during a decision-making task. We recorded LFP from the nucleus accumbens in six epilepsy patients who underwent implantation of deep brain stimulation electrodes. All patients showed significant coherence and phase-synchronization between LFP and surface EEG at delta and low theta frequencies. Although the direction of this coupling as indexed by Granger causality varied between subjects in the resting-state data, all patients showed a cortical drive of the nucleus accumbens during action selection in a decision-making task. In three patients this was accompanied by a significant coherence increase over baseline. Our results suggest that low-frequency cortico-accumbens coupling represents a highly conserved regulatory mechanism for action selection.

17 Editorial Epilepsy in childhood and quality of life. 2015

O'Callaghan, Finbar J K. ·UCL - Institute of Child Health, UK. Electronic address: finbar@me.com. ·Eur J Paediatr Neurol · Pubmed #25800878.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial The importance of theory of mind in epilepsy. 2014

Thompson, Pam. ·Department of Clinical & Experimental Epilepsy, Institute of Neurology, UCL Queen Square, London UK; Epilepsy Society, Chalfont St. Peter, Buckinghamshire, UK. Electronic address: pamela.thompson@ucl.ac.uk. ·Epilepsy Behav · Pubmed #25092409.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial When epilepsy surgery fails. 2014

Baxendale, Sallie. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, Institute of Neurology UCL, Queen Square, London, UK; Epilepsy Society, Chalfont St Peter, Buckinghamshire, UK. Electronic address: s.baxendale@ucl.ac.uk. ·Epilepsy Behav · Pubmed #24614521.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Temporal trends in epilepsy surgery. 2014

Neligan, A. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, UCL Institute of Neurology, NIHR University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre, London, UK. a.neligan@ucl.ac.uk. ·Eur J Neurol · Pubmed #24461032.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial Epilepsy as a pathology of consciousness. 2014

Cavanna, Andrea E. ·Michael Trimble Neuropsychiatry Research Group, BSMHFT, Birmingham, UK; University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK; School of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, UK; Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK. Electronic address: A.Cavanna@ion.ucl.ac.uk. ·Epilepsy Behav · Pubmed #24140517.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Review Functional imaging of the piriform cortex in focal epilepsy. 2020

Koepp, Matthias / Galovic, Marian. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, Institute of Neurology, University College London, and MRI Unit, National Society for Epilepsy, Chalfont St Peter, Buckinghamshire, UK. Electronic address: m.koepp@ucl.ac.uk. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, Institute of Neurology, University College London, and MRI Unit, National Society for Epilepsy, Chalfont St Peter, Buckinghamshire, UK. ·Exp Neurol · Pubmed #32278645.

ABSTRACT: Experiments in animal models have identified specific brain regions such as the deep anterior piriform cortex as important for controlling the initiation or propagation of both generalized and focal seizure activity. However, there is little experimental evidence to translate these observations to the control of focal seizures in humans. Here, we summarize findings from different hemodynamic and neurotransmitter functional imaging studies in groups of patients with focal epilepsies arising from different cortical locations in support of a common area of brain dysfunction in focal epilepsies.

23 Review Expert opinion: use of valproate in girls and women of childbearing potential with epilepsy: recommendations and alternatives based on a review of the literature and clinical experience-a European perspective. 2020

Toledo, Manuel / Mostacci, Barbara / Bosak, Magdalena / Jedrzejzak, Joanna / Thomas, Rhys H / Salas-Puig, Javier / Biraben, Arnaud / Schmitz, Bettina. ·Epilepsy Unit. Vall, D´Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. mtoledo@vhebron.net. · IRCCS Institute of Neurological Sciences of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Neurology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland. · Department of Neurology and Epileptology Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Neurology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Epilepsy Unit. Vall, D´Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. · Departement de Neurologie, CHU de Rennes (France), Unité d'épileptologie, Rennes, France. · Department of Neurology, Vivantes Humboldt-Klinikum Berlin, Berlin, Germany. ·J Neurol · Pubmed #32239268.

ABSTRACT: Valproate is a broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug (AED) of particular interest in pediatric epilepsy syndromes and idiopathic generalized epilepsy, as it is relatively more effective in these syndromes than other AEDs. In 2018, the European Medicines Agency introduced new restrictions on the use of valproate in girls and women of childbearing potential to avoid exposure during pregnancy. The strengthening of existing restrictions sparked controversy and debate among patients and the medical community. The high prevalence of epilepsy syndromes amenable to valproate treatment in women of childbearing age and the little information available on the teratogenic potential of alternative treatments have created uncertainty on how to manage these patients. In this consensus statement, based on a review of the literature and the clinical experience of a panel of European epilepsy experts, we present general recommendations for the optimal clinical management of AED treatment in girls, women of childbearing potential, and pregnant women across the different epilepsy syndromes.

24 Review Cognitive Function in Genetic Generalized Epilepsies: Insights From Neuropsychology and Neuroimaging. 2020

Ratcliffe, Corey / Wandschneider, Britta / Baxendale, Sallie / Thompson, Pamela / Koepp, Matthias J / Caciagli, Lorenzo. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, London, United Kingdom. · MRI Unit, Epilepsy Society, Chalfont St Peter, Buckinghamshire, United Kingdom. · Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States. ·Front Neurol · Pubmed #32210904.

ABSTRACT: Genetic generalized epilepsies (GGE), previously called idiopathic generalized epilepsies, constitute about 20% of all epilepsies, and include childhood absence epilepsy, juvenile absence epilepsy, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures alone (CAE, JAE, JME, and GGE-GTCS, respectively). GGE are characterized by high heritability, likely underlain by polygenetic mechanisms, which may relate to atypical neurodevelopmental trajectories. Age of onset ranges from pre-school years, for CAE, to early adulthood for GGE-GTCS. Traditionally, GGE have been considered benign, a belief contrary to evidence from neuropsychology studies conducted over the last two decades. In JME, deficits in executive and social functioning are common findings and relate to impaired frontal lobe function. Studies using neuropsychological measures and cognitive imaging paradigms provide evidence for hyperconnectivity between prefrontal and motor cortices, aberrant fronto-thalamo-cortical connectivity, and reduced fronto-cortical and subcortical gray matter volumes, which are associated with altered cognitive performance. Recent research has also identified associations between abnormal hippocampal morphometry and fronto-temporal activation during episodic memory. Longitudinal studies on individuals with newly diagnosed JME have observed cortical dysmaturation, which is paralleled by delayed cognitive development compared to the patients' peers. Comorbidities and cognitive deficits observed in other GGE subtypes, such as visuo-spatial and language deficits in both CAE and JAE, have also been correlated with atypical neurodevelopment. Although it remains unclear whether cognitive impairment profiles differ amongst GGE subtypes, effects may become more pronounced with disease duration, particularly in absence epilepsies. Finally, there is substantial evidence that patients with JME and their unaffected siblings share patterns of cognitive deficits, which is indicative of an underlying genetic etiology (endophenotype), independent of seizures and anti-epileptic medication.

25 Review Cognitive rehabilitation and prehabilitation in people with epilepsy. 2020

Baxendale, Sallie. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, Institute of Neurology, UCL, UK; Epilepsy Society, Chalfont St Peter, Buckinghamshire, UK; University College Hospital, London, UK. Electronic address: s.baxendale@ucl.ac.uk. ·Epilepsy Behav · Pubmed #32208338.

ABSTRACT: Epilepsy is now recognized as a network disorder of the brain that can impact cognition beyond the periictal disturbance associated with seizures. While there is a large literature on the assessment of cognitive functions, particularly memory, in people with epilepsy, there are far fewer studies looking at the efficacy of treatments for cognitive dysfunction in this population. Reviews of the cognitive rehabilitation literature in epilepsy have begun to outnumber original studies. This paper examines the possible reasons for this unsatisfactory ratio in the literature and examines the unique challenges and opportunities for cognitive rehabilitation in this population, with a particular focus on epilepsy surgical candidates. The concept of prehabilitation in this population is described. While traditional cognitive rehabilitation is implemented after a patient has developed a neuropsychological deficit, in surgical candidates, prehabilitation uses intact functions before they are lost to establish compensatory strategies and routines prior to surgery in preparation for postoperative changes. The likely postoperative neuropsychological profile for individual patients can now be modeled using preoperative data. These predictions can guide and inform the prehabilitation process. Rather than concluding with a generic call for more research, the paper presents a framework for a rehabilitation program with practical solutions to address cognitive difficulties in both surgical and nonsurgical populations of people with epilepsy.

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