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Epilepsy: HELP
Articles from University College London
Based on 1,159 articles published since 2010
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These are the 1159 published articles about Epilepsy that originated from University College London during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Practice guideline summary: Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy incidence rates and risk factors: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Epilepsy Society. 2017

Harden, Cynthia / Tomson, Torbjörn / Gloss, David / Buchhalter, Jeffrey / Cross, J Helen / Donner, Elizabeth / French, Jacqueline A / Gil-Nagel, Anthony / Hesdorffer, Dale C / Smithson, W Henry / Spitz, Mark C / Walczak, Thaddeus S / Sander, Josemir W / Ryvlin, Philippe. ·From the Department of Neurology (C.H.), Mount Sinai Health System, New York, NY · Department of Clinical Neuroscience (T.T.), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden · Department of Neurology (D.G.), CAMC Physicians, Charleston, WV · Departments of Pediatrics and Clinical Neurosciences (J.B.), Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Calgary, Canada · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Institute of Child Health (J.H.C.), and Institute of Neurology (J.W.S.), University College London · Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust (J.H.C.), London, UK · Department of Paediatrics (E.D.), Division of Neurology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Canada · Department of Neurology (J.A.F.), New York University Langone Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, New York · Department of Neurology (A.G.-N.), Hospital Ruber Internacional, Madrid, Spain · Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center and Department of Epidemiology (D.C.H.), Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY · Department of General Practice (W.H.S.), University College Cork, Ireland · Anschutz Outpatient Pavilion (M.C.S.), University of Colorado Health, Aurora · Neurology Clinic (T.S.W.), University of Minnesota, Minneapolis · Stichting Epilepsie Instellingen Nederland (SEIN) (J.W.S.), Heemstede, the Netherlands · and the Department of Clinical Neurosciences (P.R.), CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland. ·Neurology · Pubmed #28438841.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence rates of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) in different epilepsy populations and address the question of whether risk factors for SUDEP have been identified. METHODS: Systematic review of evidence; modified Grading Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation process for developing conclusions; recommendations developed by consensus. RESULTS: Findings for incidence rates based on 12 Class I studies include the following: SUDEP risk in children with epilepsy (aged 0-17 years) is 0.22/1,000 patient-years (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.16-0.31) (moderate confidence in evidence). SUDEP risk increases in adults to 1.2/1,000 patient-years (95% CI 0.64-2.32) (low confidence in evidence). The major risk factor for SUDEP is the occurrence of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS); the SUDEP risk increases in association with increasing frequency of GTCS occurrence (high confidence in evidence). RECOMMENDATIONS: Level B: Clinicians caring for young children with epilepsy should inform parents/guardians that in 1 year, SUDEP typically affects 1 in 4,500 children; therefore, 4,499 of 4,500 children will not be affected. Clinicians should inform adult patients with epilepsy that SUDEP typically affects 1 in 1,000 adults with epilepsy per year; therefore, annually 999 of 1,000 adults will not be affected. For persons with epilepsy who continue to experience GTCS, clinicians should continue to actively manage epilepsy therapies to reduce seizures and SUDEP risk while incorporating patient preferences and weighing the risks and benefits of any new approach. Clinicians should inform persons with epilepsy that seizure freedom, particularly freedom from GTCS, is strongly associated with decreased SUDEP risk.

2 Editorial Time to speed up the diagnosis of pre-eclampsia. 2019

Girling, Joanna. ·Department of Obstetric Medicine, West Middlesex University Hospital, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Joanna.Girling@chelwest.nhs.uk. ·Drug Ther Bull · Pubmed #31345955.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial A summary of data presented at the XIV conference on new antiepileptic drug and devices (EILAT XIV). 2019

Bialer, Meir / Johannessen, Svein I / Koepp, Matthias J / Levy, René H / Perucca, Emilio / Tomson, Torbjörn / White, H Steve. ·Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy and David R. Bloom Centre for Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel. Electronic address: meirb@ekmd.huji.ac.il. · The National Center for Epilepsy, Sandvika, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Department of Pharmacology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK. · Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Division of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology, Department of Internal Medicine and Therapeutics, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy; IRCCS Mondino Foundation, Pavia, Italy. · Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. ·Epilepsy Res · Pubmed #30910314.

ABSTRACT: The Fourteenth Eilat Conference on New Antiepileptic Drugs and Devices (EILAT XIV) took place in Madrid, Spain from May 13th to 16th 2018. Again, presentations on new medical devices and neuromodulation and discussions on device-related regulatory aspects were included in the programme. The virtual special issue on "neuromodulation" summarises the presentations focusing firstly, on the pre-clinical developments and the difficulties of clinical trial designs for neuromodulatory therapies, including vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) and Brain-Responsive Neurostimulation (RNS), and the use of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS) as a potential screening tool for determining the efficacy of neuromodulatory treatments in individual patients; secondly, on wearable devices for seizure monitoring through indices of peripheral sympathetic nervous activity, the use of such devices in combination with biofeedback for the treatment of epilepsy, and its potential for improving epilepsy specialist services, particularly in remote areas.

4 Editorial Pediatric epilepsy surgery: the earlier the better. 2018

Braun, Kees P J / Cross, J Helen. ·a Department of Child Neurology. Brain Center Rudolf Magnus , University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University , Utrecht , the Netherlands. · b Clinical Neurosciences Unit , UCL-Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health , London , UK. · c Young Epilepsy , Lingfield , UK. ·Expert Rev Neurother · Pubmed #29560752.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial New perspectives in epilepsy neuropathology. 2018

Thom, M. ·Department of Neuropathology, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, UK. ·Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol · Pubmed #29360171.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Neuropsychological assessment in epilepsy. 2018

Baxendale, Sallie. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, UCL Institute of Neurology, London WC1N 3BG, UK. ·Pract Neurol · Pubmed #29326240.

ABSTRACT: The role of the neuropsychological assessment in the management of people with epilepsy has evolved considerably over the past 25 years. This paper describes some of the most common applications of a neuropsychological assessment in the diagnosis, management and treatment of people with epilepsy. It describes the factors that influence the interpretation of neuropsychological test scores in this patient group and outlines the limitations of the investigation. It gives guidelines for the optimal timing of a referral, together with timelines and indications for reassessment, and provides a checklist to help the referring clinician get the most from a neuropsychological assessment for their patients with epilepsy.

7 Editorial Editorial. 2017

Walker, Matthew C. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK. ·Curr Opin Neurol · Pubmed #28212176.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Temporary replacements for oral epilepsy treatments. 2017

Sisodiya, Sanjay M. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, NIHR University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK s.sisodiya@ucl.ac.uk. ·Pract Neurol · Pubmed #28073924.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Genes cut across systems: Neurologists should think "heart" and cardiologists "brain". 2016

Nashef, Lina / Sander, Josemir W. ·From the Department of Neurology (L.N.), King's College Hospital · UCL Institute of Neurology (J.W.S.), London, UK · and Stichting Epilepsie Instellingen Nederland (SEIN) (J.W.S.), Heemstede, the Netherlands. ·Neurology · Pubmed #27466466.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Epilepsy and autism spectrum disorders: Relatively related. 2016

Scott, Rod C / Tuchman, Roberto. ·From the Department of Neurological Sciences (R.C.S.), University of Vermont, Burlington · Neurosciences Unit (R.C.S.), UCL Institute of Child Health, London, UK · and Department of Neurology (R.T.), Nicklaus Children's Hospital, Miami, FL. ·Neurology · Pubmed #27306638.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Making sense of ripples in generalized epilepsy. 2016

van Klink, N E C / Bauer, P R / Zijlmans, M. ·Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Stichting Epilepsie Instellingen Nederland (SEIN), Heemstede, The Netherlands; NIHR University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, United Kingdom. · Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands; Stichting Epilepsie Instellingen Nederland (SEIN), Heemstede, The Netherlands. Electronic address: g.j.m.zijlmans@umcutrecht.nl. ·Clin Neurophysiol · Pubmed #26777056.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Cortical drive of low-frequency oscillations in the human nucleus accumbens during action selection. 2015

Stenner, Max-Philipp / Litvak, Vladimir / Rutledge, Robb B / Zaehle, Tino / Schmitt, Friedhelm C / Voges, Jürgen / Heinze, Hans-Jochen / Dolan, Raymond J. ·Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London, United Kingdom; Department of Neurology, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany; max-philipp.stenner@med.ovgu.de. · Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London, United Kingdom; · Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London, United Kingdom; Max Planck University College London Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Neurology, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany; · Department of Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany; Department of Behavioral Neurology, Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Magdeburg, Germany; and. · Department of Neurology, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany; Department of Behavioral Neurology, Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Magdeburg, Germany; and. ·J Neurophysiol · Pubmed #25878159.

ABSTRACT: The nucleus accumbens is thought to contribute to action selection by integrating behaviorally relevant information from multiple regions, including prefrontal cortex. Studies in rodents suggest that information flow to the nucleus accumbens may be regulated via task-dependent oscillatory coupling between regions. During instrumental behavior, local field potentials (LFP) in the rat nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex are coupled at delta frequencies (Gruber AJ, Hussain RJ, O'Donnell P. PLoS One 4: e5062, 2009), possibly mediating suppression of afferent input from other areas and thereby supporting cortical control (Calhoon GG, O'Donnell P. Neuron 78: 181-190, 2013). In this report, we demonstrate low-frequency cortico-accumbens coupling in humans, both at rest and during a decision-making task. We recorded LFP from the nucleus accumbens in six epilepsy patients who underwent implantation of deep brain stimulation electrodes. All patients showed significant coherence and phase-synchronization between LFP and surface EEG at delta and low theta frequencies. Although the direction of this coupling as indexed by Granger causality varied between subjects in the resting-state data, all patients showed a cortical drive of the nucleus accumbens during action selection in a decision-making task. In three patients this was accompanied by a significant coherence increase over baseline. Our results suggest that low-frequency cortico-accumbens coupling represents a highly conserved regulatory mechanism for action selection.

13 Editorial Epilepsy in childhood and quality of life. 2015

O'Callaghan, Finbar J K. ·UCL - Institute of Child Health, UK. Electronic address: finbar@me.com. ·Eur J Paediatr Neurol · Pubmed #25800878.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial The importance of theory of mind in epilepsy. 2014

Thompson, Pam. ·Department of Clinical & Experimental Epilepsy, Institute of Neurology, UCL Queen Square, London UK; Epilepsy Society, Chalfont St. Peter, Buckinghamshire, UK. Electronic address: pamela.thompson@ucl.ac.uk. ·Epilepsy Behav · Pubmed #25092409.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial When epilepsy surgery fails. 2014

Baxendale, Sallie. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, Institute of Neurology UCL, Queen Square, London, UK; Epilepsy Society, Chalfont St Peter, Buckinghamshire, UK. Electronic address: s.baxendale@ucl.ac.uk. ·Epilepsy Behav · Pubmed #24614521.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Temporal trends in epilepsy surgery. 2014

Neligan, A. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, UCL Institute of Neurology, NIHR University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre, London, UK. a.neligan@ucl.ac.uk. ·Eur J Neurol · Pubmed #24461032.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Epilepsy as a pathology of consciousness. 2014

Cavanna, Andrea E. ·Michael Trimble Neuropsychiatry Research Group, BSMHFT, Birmingham, UK; University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK; School of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, UK; Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK. Electronic address: A.Cavanna@ion.ucl.ac.uk. ·Epilepsy Behav · Pubmed #24140517.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Review Exploring epilepsy attendance at the emergency department and interventions which may reduce unnecessary attendances: A scoping review. 2020

Burrows, Lisa / Lennard, Sarah / Hudson, Sharon / McLean, Brendan / Jadav, Mark / Henley, William / Sander, Josemir W / Shankar, Rohit. ·Department of Intellectual Disability Neuropsychiatry, Research Team, Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Truro, TR1 3QB, UK; University of Plymouth, UK. · Department of Intellectual Disability Neuropsychiatry, Research Team, Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Truro, TR1 3QB, UK. · Royal Cornwall Hospital NHS Trust, TR1 3HD, UK. · Exeter Medical School, Knowledge Spa, Truro, TR1 3HD, UK. · UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, WC1N 3BG, UK; Chalfont Centre for Epilepsy, Buckinghamshire, SL9 0RJ, UK; Stichting Epilepsie Instellingen Nederland (SEIN), Achterweg 5, 2103 SW, Heemstede, the Netherlands. · Department of Intellectual Disability Neuropsychiatry, Research Team, Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Truro, TR1 3QB, UK; Exeter Medical School, Knowledge Spa, Truro, TR1 3HD, UK. Electronic address: Rohit.shankar@nhs.net. ·Seizure · Pubmed #31999986.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Repeat attendances to emergency departments for seizures, impacts on the individual and burdens health care systems. We conducted a review to identify implementable measures which improve the management of people with epilepsy reducing healthcare costs and their supportive evidence. METHODS: A scoping review design using suitable search strategy as outlined by PRISMA-ScR was used to examine seven databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, PsychINFO, HMIC and BNI. A manual search of the COCHRANE database and citation searching was also conducted. A thematic analysis was conducted to explore the context and reasons of emergency department attendance for seizures, particularly repeat attendances and the strategies and measures deployed to reduce repeat attendances. RESULTS: Twenty-nine reports were included, comprising of a systematic review, a randomised control study, a multi-method study, quantitative studies (n = 17), qualitative studies (n = 6), an audit, a survey and a quality improvement project. Thematic analysis identified four broad areas for reducing repeat attendances. These were developing care pathways, conducting care and treatment reviews, providing educational interventions and role of ambulance staff. CONCLUSION: The findings indicate varied reasons for attendance at ED following seizure, including mental health and knowledge of seizure management and lack of education. Implementations of care pathways in ED have been found to reduce admission related costs.

19 Review Imaging epilepsy in larval zebrafish. 2020

Burrows, D R W / Samarut, É / Liu, J / Baraban, S C / Richardson, M P / Meyer, M P / Rosch, R E. ·MRC Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · Department of Neurosciences, Research Center of the University of Montreal Hospital Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Neurological Surgery and Weill Institute for Neuroscience, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · MRC Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK; Centre for Developmental Neurobiology, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · MRC Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK; Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; Department of Paediatric Neurology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. Electronic address: richard.rosch@kcl.ac.uk. ·Eur J Paediatr Neurol · Pubmed #31982307.

ABSTRACT: Our understanding of the genetic aetiology of paediatric epilepsies has grown substantially over the last decade. However, in order to translate improved diagnostics to personalised treatments, there is an urgent need to link molecular pathophysiology in epilepsy to whole-brain dynamics in seizures. Zebrafish have emerged as a promising new animal model for epileptic seizure disorders, with particular relevance for genetic and developmental epilepsies. As a novel model organism for epilepsy research they combine key advantages: the small size of larval zebrafish allows high throughput in vivo experiments; the availability of advanced genetic tools allows targeted modification to model specific human genetic disorders (including genetic epilepsies) in a vertebrate system; and optical access to the entire central nervous system has provided the basis for advanced microscopy technologies to image structure and function in the intact larval zebrafish brain. There is a growing body of literature describing and characterising features of epileptic seizures and epilepsy in larval zebrafish. Recently genetically encoded calcium indicators have been used to investigate the neurobiological basis of these seizures with light microscopy. This approach offers a unique window into the multiscale dynamics of epileptic seizures, capturing both whole-brain dynamics and single-cell behaviour concurrently. At the same time, linking observations made using calcium imaging in the larval zebrafish brain back to an understanding of epileptic seizures largely derived from cortical electrophysiological recordings in human patients and mammalian animal models is non-trivial. In this review we briefly illustrate the state of the art of epilepsy research in zebrafish with particular focus on calcium imaging of epileptic seizures in the larval zebrafish. We illustrate the utility of a dynamic systems perspective on the epileptic brain for providing a principled approach to linking observations across species and identifying those features of brain dynamics that are most relevant to epilepsy. In the following section we survey the literature for imaging features associated with epilepsy and epileptic seizures and link these to observations made from humans and other more traditional animal models. We conclude by identifying the key challenges still facing epilepsy research in the larval zebrafish and indicate strategies for future research to address these and integrate more directly with the themes and questions that emerge from investigating epilepsy in other model systems and human patients.

20 Review Optimising Evidence-Based Psychological Treatment for the Mental Health Needs of Children with Epilepsy: Principles and Methods. 2020

Shafran, Roz / Bennett, Sophie / Coughtrey, Anna / Welch, Alice / Walji, Fahreen / Cross, J Helen / Heyman, Isobel / Sibelli, Alice / Smith, Jessica / Ross, Jamie / Dalrymple, Emma / Varadkar, Sophia / Anonymous4521067 / Moss-Morris, Rona. ·Population, Policy and Practice Research and Teaching Department, University College London Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London, WC1N 1EH, UK. r.shafran@ucl.ac.uk. · Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Great Ormond Street, London, WC1N 3JH, UK. r.shafran@ucl.ac.uk. · Population, Policy and Practice Research and Teaching Department, University College London Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London, WC1N 1EH, UK. · Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Great Ormond Street, London, WC1N 3JH, UK. · Health Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Kings College London, London, SE1 9RT, UK. · King's College London, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS, UK. · Department of Primary Care and Population Health, UCL Medical School (Royal Free Campus), University College London, Rowland Hill Street, London, NW3 2PF, UK. ·Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev · Pubmed #31965422.

ABSTRACT: There are potent evidence-based psychological treatments for youth with mental health needs, yet they are rarely implemented in clinical practice, especially for youth with mental health disorders in the context of chronic physical illness such as epilepsy. Implementation science, the study of the translation of research into practice, can promote the uptake of existing effective interventions in routine clinical practice and aid the sustainable integration of psychological treatments with routine health care. The aim of this report was to use four implementation science methods to develop a version of an existing effective psychological treatment for mental health disorders [the Modular Approach to Treatment of Children with Anxiety, Depression or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC)] for use within paediatric epilepsy services: (a) literature search; (b) iterative focus groups underpinned by normalisation process theory; (c) Plan-Do-Study-Act methods; and (d) qualitative patient interviews. Findings: Three modifications were deemed necessary to facilitate implementation in children with both mental health disorders and epilepsy. These were (a) a universal brief psychoeducational component addressing the relationship between epilepsy and mental health; (b) supplementary, conditionally activated interventions addressing stigma, parental mental health and the transition to adulthood; and (c) additional training and supervision. The intervention needed relatively little alteration for implementation in paediatric epilepsy services. The modified treatment reflected the scientific literature and the views of clinicians and service users. The multi-method approach used in this report can serve as a model for implementation of evidence-based psychological treatments for children with mental health needs in the context of other chronic illnesses.

21 Review Telemedicine in epilepsy: How can we improve care, teaching, and awareness? 2020

Kissani, Najib / Lengané, Yilédoma Thierry Modeste / Patterson, Victor / Mesraoua, Boulenouar / Dawn, Eliashiv / Ozkara, Cigdem / Shears, Graeme / Riphagen, Harmiena / Asadi-Pooya, Ali A / Bogacz, Alicia / Aarrouni, Ismael El / Nair, Pradeep Pankajakshan. ·Commission of Telemedicine of the University Teaching Hospital Mohammed VI, the University Cadi Ayyad of Marrakesh, Morocco; Medical Research Center & Neurology Department, University Teaching Hospital Mohammed VI, Marrakesh, Morocco. Electronic address: najibkis@gmail.com. · Department of Neurology, University Teaching Hospital Yalgado Ouédraogo, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. · University College London, UK. · Hamad Medical Corporation, P.O. Box 3050, Doha, Qatar; Weill Cornell Medical College, Qatar, Neurology Department, P.O. Box 3050, Doha, Qatar. · UCLA Seizure Disorder Center, UCLA Department of Neurology, CA, USA. · Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Department of Neurology, Division of Clinical Electrophysiology, Istanbul, Turkey. · Epilepsy Foundation, Australia. · Epilepsy Namibia (wo292), Namibia. · Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Department of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Institute of Neurology, Epilepsy Surgical Program, Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay. · University Teaching Hospital Mohammed VI, Marrakesh, Morocco. · Department of Neurology, JIPMER, Pondicherry, India. ·Epilepsy Behav · Pubmed #31917142.

ABSTRACT: Telemedicine (TM) is the use of telecommunications' technologies to provide medical information and services. Telehealth (TH) permits broader and psychosocial support for patients and their families. We aimed to highlight the importance of the use of TH for all aspects of epilepsy, either for the scientific aspects (e.g., research, education, care, management, etc.) or for the social matters (e.g., education, sensitization, association support, etc.). There is a deep gap in knowledge and use of TH in the developing and developed countries. Epilepsy is a condition responsible for 1% of the global burden of disease. More than 50 million people have epilepsy, and barriers to care include shortage of human resources, medical facilities, and resources. Eighty (80) percent of people with epilepsy (PWE) live in low- and middle-income countries. Telehealth has the potential of addressing limited resources and improving access to PWE across the globe.

22 Review Ten things every neurologist needs to know about neuropsychological assessments and interventions in people with epilepsy. 2020

Baxendale, S A / Wilson, S J / Baker, G A / Barr, W / Helmstaedter, C / Hermann, B P / Langfitt, J / Reuner, G / Rzezak, P / Samson, S / Smith, M-L. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, Institute of Neurology, UCL, London, UK. · Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, Austin Health, University of Melbourne and Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, Melbourne, Australia. · University Department of Neurosciences, Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Liverpool, UK. · Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry, NYU School of Medicine, New York, USA. · Department of Epileptology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany. · Department of Neurology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin, USA. · Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, New York, USA. · Center for Child and Adolescent Medicine, University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute for Educational Studies, Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Medical Department, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Faculdade de Medicina da, Institute and Department of Psychiatry, Hospital das Clinicas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Epilepsy Unit, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Neuropsychology and Auditory Cognition, University of Lille, Lille, France. · Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga, Mississauga, Canada. · Neurosciences and Mental Health Program, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada. ·Eur J Neurol · Pubmed #31610070.

ABSTRACT: This paper describes 10 core features of a neuropsychological assessment with the aim of helping neurologists understand the unique contribution the evaluation can make within the wider context of diagnostic methods in epilepsy. The possibilities, limitations and cautions associated with the investigation are discussed under the following headings. (1) A neuropsychological assessment is a collaborative investigation. (2) Assessment prior to treatment allows for the accurate assessment of treatment effects. (3) The nature of an underlying lesion and its neurodevelopmental context play an important role in shaping the associated neuropsychological deficit. (4) Cognitive and behavioural impairments result from the essential comorbidities of epilepsy which can be considered as much a disorder of cognition and behaviour as of seizures. (5) Patients' subjective complaints can help us understand objective cognitive impairments and their underlying neuroanatomy, resulting in improved patient care. At other times, patient complaints reflect other factors and require careful interpretation. (6) The results from a neuropsychological assessment can be used to maximize the educational and occupational potentials of people with epilepsy. (7) Not all patients are able to engage with a neuropsychological assessment. (8) There are limitations in assessments conducted in a second language with tests that have been standardized on different populations from that of the patient. (9) Adequate intervals between assessments maximize sensitivity to meaningful change. (10) Patients should be fully informed about the purpose of the assessment and have realistic expectations of the outcome prior to referral.

23 Review Epilepsy surgery. 2020

Rugg-Gunn, Fergus / Miserocchi, Anna / McEvoy, Andrew. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, University College London Institute of Neurology, London, UK f.rugg-gunn@ucl.ac.uk. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, University College London Institute of Neurology, London, UK. ·Pract Neurol · Pubmed #31420415.

ABSTRACT: Epilepsy surgery offers the chance of seizure remission for the 30%-40% of patients with focal epilepsy whose seizures continue despite anti-epileptic medications. Epilepsy surgery encompasses curative resective procedures, palliative techniques such as corpus callosotomy and implantation of stimulation devices. Pre-surgical evaluation aims to identify the epileptogenic zone and to prevent post-operative neurological and cognitive deficits. This entails optimal imaging, prolonged video-electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings, and neuropsychological and psychiatric assessments; some patients may then require nuclear medicine imaging and intracranial EEG recording. The best outcomes are in those with an electro-clinically concordant structural lesion on MRI (60%-70% seizure freedom). Lower rates of seizure freedom are expected in people with extra-temporal lobe foci, focal-to-bilateral tonic-clonic seizures, normal structural imaging, psychiatric co-morbidity and learning disability. Nevertheless, surgery for epilepsy is under-used and should be considered for all patients with refractory focal epilepsy in whom two or three anti-epileptic medications have been ineffective.

24 Review Functional Genomics of Epilepsy and Associated Neurodevelopmental Disorders Using Simple Animal Models: From Genes, Molecules to Brain Networks. 2019

Rosch, Richard / Burrows, Dominic R W / Jones, Laura B / Peters, Colin H / Ruben, Peter / Samarut, Éric. ·MRC Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Paediatric Neurology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States. · Department of Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada. · Department of Neurosciences, Research Center of the University of Montreal Hospital Center (CRCHUM), Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada. · Modelis Inc., Montreal, QC, Canada. ·Front Cell Neurosci · Pubmed #31920556.

ABSTRACT: The genetic diagnosis of patients with seizure disorders has been improved significantly by the development of affordable next-generation sequencing technologies. Indeed, in the last 20 years, dozens of causative genes and thousands of associated variants have been described and, for many patients, are now considered responsible for their disease. However, the functional consequences of these mutations are often not studied

25 Review Valproate, sexual health, and men: A narrative review. 2019

Watkins, Lance Vincent / Angus-Leppan, Heather. ·Swansea Bay University Health Board, Mental Health and Learning Disability Delivery Unit, LLwyneryr Unit, Swansea, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Lance.watkins@wales.nhs.uk. · Epilepsy Initiative Group, Royal Free London, United Kingdom; University College London, United Kingdom. ·Epilepsy Behav · Pubmed #31892466.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This article explores current evidence about the effects of valproate (VPA) medicines on sexual health in men, how to monitor symptoms, communicate with patients, and improve clinical outcomes. There has been a lot of focus on VPA use in women of childbearing age following recent changes to prescribing regulations owing to the well-established and significant teratogenic risk. Concerns have been raised by patients and clinicians as to the risk of adverse sexual effects of VPA use in men. RESULTS: The evidence base for the effect of VPA on sexual function compared with other antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in men is limited with no randomized controlled trials. Sexual function in men with epilepsy is complex, and there is no direct relationship between objective measures of sexual function and sexual satisfaction. Epilepsy, comorbidities, psychosocial factors, and most AEDs including VPA may cause sexual dysfunction in men, including reduced sexual desire, erectile dysfunction, and fertility problems. Sexual and reproductive function should be discussed with men prior to treatment with AEDs including VPA. CONCLUSION: Early and proactive discussion of sexual and reproductive functioning mitigates, rather than increases, the risk of sexual problems and potentially improves adherence. Sexual dysfunction in men with cognitive impairment [such as intellectual disability (ID) and dementia] may present with behavioral disturbance. Identification of sexual adverse effects of medication could significantly change treatment plans which is of particular importance for individuals with treatment resistance. We provide an information fact sheet for men to help guide prescribing discussions.

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