Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Infectious Disease Transmission HELP
Based on 25,409 articles published since 2010
||||

These are the 25409 published articles about Disease Transmission, Infectious that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Screening for HIV Infection: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2019

Anonymous4430993 / Owens, Douglas K / Davidson, Karina W / Krist, Alex H / Barry, Michael J / Cabana, Michael / Caughey, Aaron B / Curry, Susan J / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Pbert, Lori / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of California, San Francisco. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · University of Iowa, Iowa City. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #31184701.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Approximately 1.1 million persons in the United States are currently living with HIV, and more than 700 000 persons have died of AIDS since the first cases were reported in 1981. There were approximately 38 300 new diagnoses of HIV infection in 2017. The estimated prevalence of HIV infection among persons 13 years and older in the United States is 0.4%, and data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show a significant increase in HIV diagnoses starting at age 15 years. An estimated 8700 women living with HIV give birth each year in the United States. HIV can be transmitted from mother to child during pregnancy, labor, delivery, and breastfeeding. The incidence of perinatal HIV infection in the United States peaked in 1992 and has declined significantly following the implementation of routine prenatal HIV screening and the use of effective therapies and precautions to prevent mother-to-child transmission. Objective: To update the 2013 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for HIV infection in adolescents, adults, and pregnant women. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for HIV infection in nonpregnant adolescents and adults, the yield of screening for HIV infection at different intervals, the effects of initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) at a higher vs lower CD4 cell count, and the longer-term harms associated with currently recommended ART regimens. The USPSTF also reviewed the evidence on the benefits (specifically, reduced risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection) and harms of screening for HIV infection in pregnant persons, the yield of repeat screening for HIV at different intervals during pregnancy, the effectiveness of currently recommended ART regimens for reducing mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection, and the harms of ART during pregnancy to the mother and infant. Findings: The USPSTF found convincing evidence that currently recommended HIV tests are highly accurate in diagnosing HIV infection. The USPSTF found convincing evidence that identification and early treatment of HIV infection is of substantial benefit in reducing the risk of AIDS-related events or death. The USPSTF found convincing evidence that the use of ART is of substantial benefit in decreasing the risk of HIV transmission to uninfected sex partners. The USPSTF also found convincing evidence that identification and treatment of pregnant women living with HIV infection is of substantial benefit in reducing the rate of mother-to-child transmission. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that ART is associated with some harms, including neuropsychiatric, renal, and hepatic harms, and an increased risk of preterm birth in pregnant women. The USPSTF concludes with high certainty that the net benefit of screening for HIV infection in adolescents, adults, and pregnant women is substantial. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends screening for HIV infection in adolescents and adults aged 15 to 65 years. Younger adolescents and older adults who are at increased risk of infection should also be screened. (A recommendation) The USPSTF recommends screening for HIV infection in all pregnant persons, including those who present in labor or at delivery whose HIV status is unknown. (A recommendation).

2 Guideline Guidance for the decontamination of intracavity medical devices: the report of a working group of the Healthcare Infection Society. 2019

Bradley, C R / Hoffman, P N / Egan, K / Jacobson, S K / Colville, A / Spencer, W / Larkin, S / Jenks, P J. ·Hospital Infection Research Laboratory, Birmingham, UK. · Public Health England, London, UK. Electronic address: peter.hoffman@phe.gov.uk. · Mid Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Crewe, UK. · Southmead Hospital, North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol, UK. · Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust, Exeter, UK. · Spencer Nickson Ltd, Cheshire, UK. · Aintree University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK. · Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, UK. ·J Hosp Infect · Pubmed #30092292.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Intracavity medical devices (ICMDs) are used in a wide variety of healthcare settings. The approach to their decontamination and the resources available also differ widely. Their potential for infection transmission is considerable. AIM: To produce a comprehensive risk assessment-based approach to the decontamination of ICMDs, accompanied by an adaptable audit tool.

3 Guideline Updated clinical practice guidelines on pregnancy care. 2018

Homer, Caroline Se / Oats, Jeremy / Middleton, Philippa / Ramson, Jenny / Diplock, Samantha. ·Centre for Midwifery, Child and Family Health, UTS Sydney, Sydney, NSW caroline.homer@uts.edu.au. · Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC. · Robinson Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA. · Ampersand Health Science Writing, Tanja, NSW. · Department of Health, Canberra, ACT. ·Med J Aust · Pubmed #30376663.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The clinical practice guidelines on pregnancy care have been developed to provide reliable and standardised guidance for health professionals providing antenatal care in Australia. They were originally released as the Clinical Practice Guidelines: Antenatal Care in two separate editions (modules 1 and 2) in 2012 and 2014. These modules have now been combined and updated to form a single set of consolidated guidelines that were publicly released in February 2018 as the Clinical Practice Guidelines: Pregnancy Care. Eleven topics have been updated and new guidance on substance use in pregnancy has been added. Main recommendations: The updated guidelines include the following key changes to practice: recommend routine testing for hepatitis C at the first antenatal visit; recommend against routine testing for vitamin D status in the absence of a specific indication; recommend discussing weight change, diet and physical activity with all pregnant women; and recommend offering pregnant women the opportunity to be weighed at every antenatal visit and encouraging women to self-monitor weight gain. Changes in management as a result of the guidelines: The guidelines will enable pregnant women diagnosed with hepatitis C to be identified and thus avoid invasive procedures that increase the risk of mother-to-baby transmission. Women can be treated postpartum, reducing the risk of liver disease and removing the risk of perinatal infection for subsequent pregnancies. Routine testing of all pregnant women for vitamin D status and subsequent vitamin D supplementation is not supported by evidence and should cease as the benefits and harms of vitamin D supplementation remain unclear. The recommendation for health professionals to provide advice to pregnant women about weight, diet and physical activity, and the opportunity to be weighed will help women to make changes leading to better health outcomes for themselves and their babies.

4 Guideline Screening for Syphilis Infection in Pregnant Women: US Preventive Services Task Force Reaffirmation Recommendation Statement. 2018

Anonymous830961 / Curry, Susan J / Krist, Alex H / Owens, Douglas K / Barry, Michael J / Caughey, Aaron B / Davidson, Karina W / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Kemper, Alex R / Kubik, Martha / Kurth, Ann E / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Phipps, Maureen G / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·University of Iowa, Iowa City. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #30193283.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Untreated syphilis infection in pregnant women can be transmitted to the fetus (congenital syphilis) at any time during pregnancy or at birth. Congenital syphilis is associated with stillbirth, neonatal death, and significant morbidity in infants (eg, bone deformities and neurologic impairment). After a steady decline from 2008 to 2012, cases of congenital syphilis markedly increased from 2012 to 2106, from 8.4 to 15.7 cases per 100 000 live births (an increase of 87%). At the same time, national rates of syphilis increased among women of reproductive age. Objective: To update the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) 2009 recommendation on screening for syphilis infection in pregnant women. Evidence Review: The USPSTF commissioned a reaffirmation evidence update to identify new and substantial evidence sufficient enough to change its prior recommendation. Given the established benefits and practice of screening for syphilis in pregnant women, the USPSTF targeted its evidence review on the direct benefits of screening on the prevention of congenital syphilis morbidity and mortality and the harms of screening for and treatment of syphilis infection in pregnant women. Findings: Using a reaffirmation process, the USPSTF found that accurate screening algorithms are available to identify syphilis infection. Effective treatment with antibiotics can prevent congenital syphilis and significantly decrease adverse pregnancy outcomes, with small associated harms, providing an overall substantial health benefit. Therefore, the USPSTF reaffirms its previous conclusion that there is convincing evidence that screening for syphilis infection in pregnant women provides substantial benefit. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends early screening for syphilis infection in all pregnant women. (A recommendation).

5 Guideline Practice Alert: ACIP vaccine update. 2018

Campos-Outcalt, Doug. ·University of Arizona, Phoenix, AZ, USA. E-mail: dougco@email.arizona.edu. ·J Fam Pract · Pubmed #29509821.

ABSTRACT: The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices made relatively few new vaccine recommendations in 2017. One pertained to prevention of hepatitis B virus infection in infants born to HBV-infected mothers. Another recommended a new vaccine to prevent shingles. A third advised considering an additional dose of mumps vaccine during an outbreak.

6 Guideline [The Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases guidelines on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of neonatal herpes simplex infections]. 2018

Anonymous1590937. · ·An Pediatr (Barc) · Pubmed #29453157.

ABSTRACT: Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections are rare, but are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Most newborns acquire herpes simplex virus infection in the peripartum period. For peripartum transmission to occur, women must be shedding the virus in their genital tracts symptomatically or asymptomatically around the time of delivery. There are evidence-based interventions in pregnancy to prevent the transmission to the newborn. Caesarean section should be performed in the presence of herpetic lesions, and antiviral prophylaxis in the last weeks of pregnancy is recommended to suppress genital tract herpes simplex virus at the time of delivery. The diagnosis and early treatment of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections require a high index of suspicion, especially in the absence of skin lesions. It is recommended to rule out herpes simplex virus infections in those newborns with mucocutaneous lesions, central nervous system involvement, or septic appearance. The prognosis of newborns with skin, eye, and/or mouth disease in the high-dose acyclovir era is very good. Antiviral treatment not only improves mortality rates in disseminated and central nervous system disease, but also improves the rates of long-term neurodevelopmental impairment in the cases of disseminated disease. Interestingly, a 6-month suppressive course of oral acyclovir following the acute infection has improved the neurodevelopmental prognosis in patients with CNS involvement.

7 Guideline No. 354-Canadian HIV Pregnancy Planning Guidelines. 2018

Loutfy, Mona / Kennedy, V Logan / Poliquin, Vanessa / Dzineku, Frederick / Dean, Nicola L / Margolese, Shari / Symington, Alison / Money, Deborah M / Hamilton, Scot / Conway, Tracey / Khan, Sarah / Yudin, Mark H. ·Toronto, ON. · Winnipeg, MB. · Montréal, QC. · Blenheim, ON. · Vancouver, BC. · Mississauga, ON. · Sault Ste. Marie, ON. · Hamilton, ON. · Toronto, ON. Electronic address: yudinm@smh.ca. ·J Obstet Gynaecol Can · Pubmed #29274714.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The objective of the Canadian HIV Pregnancy Planning Guidelines is to provide clinical information and recommendations for health care providers to assist Canadians affected by HIV with their fertility, preconception, and pregnancy planning decisions. These guidelines are evidence- and community-based and flexible and take into account diverse and intersecting local/population needs based on the social determinants of health. INTENDED OUTCOMES: EVIDENCE: Literature searches were conducted by a librarian using the Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Embase databases for published articles in English and French related to HIV and pregnancy and HIV and pregnancy planning for each section of the guidelines. The full search strategy is available upon request. VALUES: The evidence obtained was reviewed and evaluated by the Infectious Diseases Committee of the SOGC under the leadership of the principal authors, and recommendations were made according to the guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care and through use of the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation instrument for the development of clinical guidelines. BENEFITS, HARMS, AND COSTS: Guideline implementation should assist the practitioner in developing an evidence-based approach for the prevention of unplanned pregnancy, preconception, fertility, and pregnancy planning counselling in the context of HIV infection. VALIDATION: These guidelines have been reviewed and approved by the Infectious Disease Committee and the Executive and Council of the SOGC. SPONSOR: Canadian Institutes of Health Research Grant Planning and Dissemination grant (Funding Reference # 137186), which funded a Development Team meeting in 2016.

8 Guideline Responsibilities of the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Provider in the Treatment and Prevention of Climate Change-Related Health Problems. 2018

Perkison, William B / Kearney, Gregory D / Saberi, Pouné / Guidotti, Tee / McCarthy, Ronda / Cook-Shimanek, Margaret / Pensa, Mellisa A / Nabeel, Ismail / Anonymous4550930. ·American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Elk Grove Village, Illinois. ·J Occup Environ Med · Pubmed #29252921.

ABSTRACT: : Workers are uniquely susceptible to the health hazards imposed by environmental changes. Occupational and environmental medicine (OEM) providers are at the forefront of emerging health issues pertaining to working populations including climate change, and must be prepared to recognize, respond to, and mitigate climate change-related health effects in workers. This guidance document from the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine focuses on North American workers health effects that may occur as a result of climate change and describes the responsibilities of the OEM provider in responding to these health challenges.

9 Guideline National Tuberculosis Advisory Committee Guideline: Management of Tuberculosis Risk in Healthcare Workers in Australia. 2017

Waring, Justin / Waring, Justin / Anonymous4550945. ·Medical Director, Western Australian TB Control Program Government of Western Australian Department of Health. ·Commun Dis Intell Q Rep · Pubmed #29720067.

ABSTRACT: Tuberculosis (TB) is uncommon in Australia and not commonly managed by most healthcare workers (HCWs). However, even in a low incidence setting, occasional exposure of HCWs is inevitable and transmission of TB to HCWs leading to disease does occur. In addition, HCWs may have been recruited to Australia from countries with high TB incidence. These HCWs are more likely to be infected with TB before arrival and subsequently develop active disease while working in health settings in Australia. In 2001, there were 20 TB notifications in HCWs in Australia, of which 10 were born overseas, whereas in 2013, 70 of 77 notified cases (91%) were people born overseas.1, 2 Managing the risk of TB in HCWs is multifaceted. A combination of staff education, awareness, early diagnosis, appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE), environmental controls and screening procedures is required to minimise the risk of transmission to HCWs and from HCWs to patients. Prevention of nosocomial transmission from HCWs is particularly important in patients that are more vulnerable, for example children and the immunocompromised. This document aims to describe the components that are considered essential for all healthcare facilities in Australia to minimise this risk. It is not intended to be operational, and reference should be made to specific state and territory TB Control Program policies for this detail. Each facility should develop its own policy for the management of TB risk in HCWs according to this jurisdictional policy and the facility specific factors that determine risk, but it should include at least the following components.

10 Guideline [Genital herpes and pregnancy: Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, prevention and screening. Guidelines for clinical practice from the French College of Gynecologists and Obstetrician (CNGOF)]. 2017

Picone, O. ·Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, hôpital Louis-Mourier, hôpitaux universitaires Paris Nord, 147, rue des Renouillets, 92700 Colombes, France. Electronic address: olivier.picone@aphp.fr. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #29146286.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To analyze the consequences of genital herpes infections in pregnant women. METHODS: The PubMed database and the recommendations from the French and foreign obstetrical societies or colleges have been consulted. RESULTS: The symptomatology of herpes genital rash is often atypical (NP2) and not different during pregnancy (Professional consensus). It is most often due to HSV2 (NP2). Seventy percent of pregnant patients have a history of infection with Herpes simplex virus, without reference to genital or labial localization, and this is in most cases type 1 (NP2). The prevalence of clinical herpes lesions at birth in the event of recurrence is about 16% compared with 36% in the case of initial infection (NP4). In HSV+ patients, asymptomatic herpetic excretion is 4 to 10%. The rate of excretion increases in HIV+ patients (20 to 30%) (NP2). The risk of HSV seroconversion during pregnancy is 1 to 5% (NP2), but can reach 20% in case of sero-discordant couple (NP2). Questioning is not always sufficient to determine the history of herpes infection of a patient and her partner (NP2) and the clinical examination is not always reliable (NP2). Herpetic hepatitis and encephalitis are rare and potentially severe (NP4). These diagnoses should be discussed during pregnancy and antiviral therapy should be started as soon as possible (Professional consensus). There is no established link between herpes infection and miscarriages (NP3). There appears to be an association between untreated herpes infection and premature delivery (NP3) but not in the case of treated infections (NP4). Herpetic fetopathies are exceptional (NP4). There is no argument for recommending specific prenatal diagnosis for herpes infection during pregnancy (Professional consensus). Condom use reduces the risk of initial infection in women who are not pregnant (NP3). There is no evidence to justify routine screening during pregnancy (Professional consensus). CONCLUSION: There is a strong discrepancy between the prevalence of herpetic excretion at the time of delivery and the scarcity of neonatal infections. There is a lack of data on the impact of herpes infections during pregnancy in France. Fetal and maternal consequences are potentially serious but rare.

11 Guideline [Neonatal herpes: Epidemiology, clinical manifestations and management. Guidelines for clinical practice from the French College of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (CNGOF)]. 2017

Renesme, L. ·Unité de néonatalogie soins intensifs-pédiatrie de maternité, centre Aliénor d'Aquitaine, groupe hospitalier Pellegrin, centre hospitalier universitaire de Bordeaux, place Amélie-Raba-Léon, 33000 Bordeaux, France. Electronic address: Laurent.renesme@chu-bordeaux.fr. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #29132771.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To describe the epidemiology of neonatal herpes and its risk factors, clinical and paraclinic manifestations, propose guidelines for a newborn at risk of neonatal herpes, describe treatment modalities, describe post-natal transmission and its prevention. METHODS: Bibliographic search from Medline, Cochrane Library databases and research of international clinical practice guidelines. RESULTS: Neonatal herpes is rare (about 20 cases per year in France) and mainly due to HSV 1 (level of evidence LE3). The main risk factors for mother-to-child transmission are maternal primary episode of genital herpes close to delivery and serotype HSV 1 (LE3). There are three clinical forms of neonatal herpes : SEM infection for skin, eyes and mucosa, central nervous system (CNS) associated infection, and the disseminated infection. Neurological mortality and morbidity depend on the clinical form and the HSV serotype (LE3). In most of the case of neonatal herpes, the mothers have no history of genital herpes (LE3). Fever and vesicular rash may be absent at the time of diagnosis (LE3). In case of suspicion of neonatal herpes, different samples (blood and cerebrospinal fluid) for HSV PCR must be carried out to confirm the diagnosis (Professional consensus). Any newborn suspected of neonatal herpes should be treated with intravenous aciclovir (Grade A) prior to the results of HSV PCR (Professional consensus). In case of maternal genital herpes at delivery, the management of an asymptomatic newborn depends on the evaluation of the risk of transmission. In case of maternal reactivation (low risk of transmission), HSV PCR samples are taken at 24hours of life and the newborn must be follow closely until results. In the case of maternal primary episode or non-primary infection first episode (high risk of transmission), the samples are taken at 24hours of life and intravenous treatment with aciclovir is started (Professional consensus). The treatment of neonatal herpes is based on intravenous aciclovir (60mg/kg/day divided into 3 injections) (Grade C). The duration of the treatment depends on the clinical form (14 days for the SEM infection, 21 days for the other forms) (Professional consensus). A relay with aciclovir per os (300mg/m CONCLUSIONS: Neonatal herpes is a rare disease with a high morbidity and mortality. The management of a newborn at risk requires good coordination between the obstetric and pediatric teams and parent's information.

12 Guideline [Management of pregnant women with recurrent herpes. Guidelines for clinical practice from the French College of Gynecologists, Obstetricians (CNGOF)]. 2017

Anselem, O. ·Maternité Port-Royal, université Paris Descartes, groupe hospitalier Cochin-Broca-Hôtel-Dieu, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, 53, avenue de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris, France; DHU risques et grossesse, PRES Sorbonne Paris Cité, 53, avenue de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris, France. Electronic address: olivia.anselem@aphp.fr. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #29132770.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide guidelines for the management of woman with genital herpes during pregnancy or labor and with known history of genital herpes. METHODS: MedLine and Cochrane Library databases search and review of the main foreign guidelines. RESULTS: Genital herpes ulceration during pregnancy in a woman with history of genital herpes correspond to a recurrence. In this situation, there is no need for virologic confirmation (Grade B). In case of recurrent herpes during pregnancy, antiviral therapy with acyclovir or valacyclovir can be administered but provide low efficiency on duration and severity of symptoms (Grade C). Antiviral treatment proposed is acyclovir (200mg 5 times daily) or valacyclovir (500mg twice daily) for 5 to 10 days (Grade C). Recurrent herpes is associated with a risk of neonatal herpes around 1% (LE3). Antiviral prophylaxis should be offered for women with recurrent genital herpes during pregnancy from 36 weeks of gestation and until delivery (Grade B). There is no evidence of the benefit of prophylaxis in case or recurrence only before the pregnancy. There is no recommendation for systematic prophylaxis for women with history of recurrent genital herpes and no recurrence during the pregnancy. At the onset of labor, virologic testing is indicated only in case of genital ulceration (Professional consensus). In case of recurrent genital herpes at the onset of labor, cesarean delivery will be all the more considered if the membranes are intact and/or in case of prematurity and/or in case of HIV positive woman and vaginal delivery will be all the more considered in case of prolonged rupture of membranes after 37 weeks of gestation in an HIV negative woman (Professional consensus). CONCLUSION: In case of recurrent genital herpes at the onset of labor and intact membranes, cesarean delivery should be considered. In case of recurrent genital herpes and prolonged rupture of membranes at term, the benefit of cesarean delivery is more questionable and vaginal delivery should be considered.

13 Guideline Infectious Diseases Associated With Organized Sports and Outbreak Control. 2017

Davies, H Dele / Jackson, Mary Anne / Rice, Stephen G / Anonymous5290920 / Anonymous5300920. · ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #28947608.

ABSTRACT: Participation in organized sports has a variety of health benefits but also has the potential to expose the athlete to a variety of infectious diseases, some of which may produce outbreaks. Major risk factors for infection include skin-to-skin contact with athletes who have active skin infections, environmental exposures and physical trauma, and sharing of equipment and contact with contaminated fomites. Close contact that is intrinsic to team sports and psychosocial factors associated with adolescence are additional risks. Minimizing risk requires leadership by the organized sports community (including the athlete's primary care provider) and depends on outlining key hygiene behaviors, recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of common sports-related infections, and the implementation of preventive interventions.

14 Guideline Antiretroviral therapy in pregnant women living with HIV: a clinical practice guideline. 2017

Siemieniuk, Reed A C / Lytvyn, Lyubov / Mah Ming, Jinell / Mullen, Rhonda Marama / Anam, Florence / Otieno, Teresia / Guyatt, Gordon H / Taylor, Graham P / Beltrán-Arroyave, Claudia / Okwen, Patrick Mbah / Nduati, Ruth / Kinuthia, John / Luma, Henry Namme / Kirpalani, Haresh / Merglen, Arnaud / Lesi, Olufunmilayo A / Vandvik, Per Olav / Agoritsas, Thomas / Bewley, Susan. ·Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada; Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada reed.siemieniuk@medportal.ca. · Oslo University Hospital, Forskningsveien 2b, Blindern 0317 Oslo, Norway. · Southern Alberta HIV Clinic, Calgary, Canada. · INA (Māori, Indigenous & South Pacific) HIV/AIDS Foundation, Tirau, New Zealand. · International Community of Women living with HIV (ICW-Global), Nairobi, Kenya. · ATHENA Network, Seattle, USA. · Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada; Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Imperial College London, London, UK. · Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin, Colombia. · Bali District Hospital, Yaoundé, Cameroon. · University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya. · Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. · University of Yaoundé, Yaoundé, Cameroon. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA. · Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland. · Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria; College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Nigeria. · Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, 0318 Oslo, Norway; Department of Medicine, Innlandet Hospital Trust-division, Gjøvik, Norway. · Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada; Division General Internal Medicine & Division of Clinical Epidemiology, University Hospitals of Geneva, CH-1211, Geneva, Switzerland. · Women's Health Academic Centre, King's College London, London, UK. ·BMJ · Pubmed #28893728.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Guideline No. 208-Guidelines for the Management of Herpes Simplex Virus in Pregnancy. 2017

Money, Deborah M / Steben, Marc. ·Vancouver, BC. Electronic address: deborah.money@ubc.ca. · Montréal, QC. ·J Obstet Gynaecol Can · Pubmed #28729112.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide recommendations for the management of genital herpes infection in women who want to get pregnant or are pregnant and for the management of genital herpes in pregnancy and strategies to prevent transmission to the infant. OUTCOMES: More effective management of complications of genital herpes in pregnancy and prevention of transmission of genital herpes from mother to infant. EVIDENCE: Medline was searched for articles published in French or English related to genital herpes and pregnancy. Additional articles were identified through the references of these articles. All study types and recommendation reports were reviewed. VALUES: Recommendations were made according to the guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. RECOMMENDATIONS: VALIDATION: These guidelines have been reviewed and approved by the Infectious Diseases Committee of the SOGC. SPONSOR: The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada.

16 Guideline Hepatitis B vaccines: WHO position paper – July 2017. 2017

Anonymous970912. · ·Wkly Epidemiol Rec · Pubmed #28685564.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Guideline None 2017

Franz, Axel / Härtel, Christoph / Herting, Egbert / Kehl, Sven / Gille, Christian / Doubek, Klaus / Spellerberg, Barbara / Maier, Rolf Felix / Vetter, Klaus / Eglin, Katarina. · ·Z Geburtshilfe Neonatol · Pubmed #28666303.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Guideline No. 185-HIV Screening in Pregnancy. 2017

Keenan-Lindsay, Lisa / Yudin, Mark H. ·Toronto, ON. ·J Obstet Gynaecol Can · Pubmed #28625292.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this guideline is to provide recommendations to obstetric health care providers and to minimize practice variations for HIV screening, while taking provincial and territorial recommendations into account. OUTCOMES: The risk of transmission of HIV from mother to fetus is significant if the mother is not treated. The primary outcome of screening for and treating HIV in pregnancy is a marked decrease in the rate of vertical transmission of HIV from mother to fetus. Secondary outcomes include confirmation of HIV infection in the woman, which allows optimization of her health and long-term management. EVIDENCE: The Cochrane Library and Medline were searched for English-language articles published related to HIV screening and pregnancy. Additional articles were identified through the references of these articles. All study types were reviewed.

19 Guideline Guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of scabies in Japan (third edition): Executive Committee of Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Scabies. 2017

Anonymous1450908. ·The Japanese Dermatological Association, Tokyo, Japan. ·J Dermatol · Pubmed #28561292.

ABSTRACT: In the current work, we present our new guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of scabies which we, the Executive Committee convened by the Japanese Dermatological Association, developed to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment of scabies in Japan. Approval of phenothrin topical use under the National Health Insurance in August 2014 led to this action. Permethrin, a topical anti-scabietic medication belonging to the same pyrethroid group as phenothrin, is already in use worldwide. In this guideline, we introduce criteria for a proper diagnosis of scabies, treatment algorithm for common and crusted (hyperkeratotic) scabies, and prevention. The major change from our second edition is the treatment algorithm. As phenothrin is now available, the first-line therapy for common scabies is either topical phenothrin lotion or oral ivermectin. The second-line option for topical treatment is sulfur-containing ointments, crotamiton cream or benzyl benzoate lotion. γ-Benzene hexachloride ointment is no longer provided for clinical use. In an immunosuppressed patient, the treatment option is still the same, but with close follow up. If the symptoms persist, diagnosis and treatment must be reassessed. For hyperkeratotic scabies and nail scabies, removal of thick crust, cutting of nails and occlusive dressing are additionally required. The safety and effectiveness of combined treatment with topical and oral medications are not yet confirmed. Further assessment is needed. In addition to appropriate treatment, it is essential to educate patients and health-care workers and to conduct epidemiological studies to prevent further spread of the disease through effectively utilizing available resources including manpower, finance, logistics and time.

20 Guideline EASL 2017 Clinical Practice Guidelines on the management of hepatitis B virus infection. 2017

Anonymous7090903 / Anonymous7100903. · ·J Hepatol · Pubmed #28427875.

ABSTRACT: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a global public health problem with changing epidemiology due to several factors including vaccination policies and migration. This Clinical Practice Guideline presents updated recommendations for the optimal management of HBV infection. Chronic HBV infection can be classified into five phases: (I) HBeAg-positive chronic infection, (II) HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis, (III) HBeAg-negative chronic infection, (IV) HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis and (V) HBsAg-negative phase. All patients with chronic HBV infection are at increased risk of progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), depending on host and viral factors. The main goal of therapy is to improve survival and quality of life by preventing disease progression, and consequently HCC development. The induction of long-term suppression of HBV replication represents the main endpoint of current treatment strategies, while HBsAg loss is an optimal endpoint. The typical indication for treatment requires HBV DNA >2,000IU/ml, elevated ALT and/or at least moderate histological lesions, while all cirrhotic patients with detectable HBV DNA should be treated. Additional indications include the prevention of mother to child transmission in pregnant women with high viremia and prevention of HBV reactivation in patients requiring immunosuppression or chemotherapy. The long-term administration of a potent nucleos(t)ide analogue with high barrier to resistance, i.e., entecavir, tenofovir disoproxil or tenofovir alafenamide, represents the treatment of choice. Pegylated interferon-alfa treatment can also be considered in mild to moderate chronic hepatitis B patients. Combination therapies are not generally recommended. All patients should be monitored for risk of disease progression and HCC. Treated patients should be monitored for therapy response and adherence. HCC remains the major concern for treated chronic hepatitis B patients. Several subgroups of patients with HBV infection require specific focus. Future treatment strategies to achieve 'cure' of disease and new biomarkers are discussed.

21 Guideline No. 342-Hepatitis B and Pregnancy. 2017

Castillo, Eliana / Murphy, Kellie / van Schalkwyk, Julie. ·Calgary, AB. · Toronto, ON. · Vancouver, BC. ·J Obstet Gynaecol Can · Pubmed #28284515.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To review the epidemiology, natural history, evaluation, and treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection during pregnancy. This will aid obstetric care providers in counseling their patients regarding perinatal risks and management options available to pregnant women with hepatitis B. OUTCOMES: Outcomes evaluated include thresholds for HBV anti-viral treatment for prevention of perinatal transmission and for invasive procedures during pregnancy for women with hepatitis B infection. EVIDENCE: Medline, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched for articles in English on subjects related to HBV infection, pregnancy, and perinatal transmission from 1966 to March 2016. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Other (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical speciality societies. VALIDATION METHODS: The quality of the evidence is rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). Recommendations for practice are ranked according to the method described in this Report. GUIDELINE UPDATE: The guideline will be reviewed 5 years after publication to decide if an update is required. However, if important new evidence is published prior to the 5-year cycle, the review process may be accelerated for a more rapid update of some recommendations. SPONSORS: This guideline was developed with resources funded by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada.

22 Guideline Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention of Congenital Toxoplasmosis in the United States. 2017

Maldonado, Yvonne A / Read, Jennifer S / Anonymous30895. · ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #28138010.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Guideline Practical Guidelines for Studies on Sandfly-Borne Phleboviruses: Part I: Important Points to Consider Ante Field Work. 2017

Ayhan, Nazli / Baklouti, Amal / Prudhomme, Jorian / Walder, Gernot / Amaro, Fatima / Alten, Bulent / Moutailler, Sara / Ergunay, Koray / Charrel, Remi N / Huemer, Hartwig. ·1 UMR "Emergence des Pathologies Virales" (EPV: Aix-Marseille Univ. - IRD 190 - Inserm 1207 - EHESP), Fondation IHU Méditerranée Infection, APHM Public Hospitals of Marseille , Marseille, France . · 2 Centre IRD, UMR MIVEGEC (IRD 224 - CNRS 5290 - Université Montpellier) , Montpellier, France . · 3 GmbH , 9931 Außervillgraten, Austria . · 4 Centre for Vectors and Infectious Diseases Research, National Institute of Health Ricardo Jorge , Águas de Moura, Portugal . · 5 Ecology Section, ESRL Laboratories, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Hacettepe University , Ankara, Turkey . · 6 Animal Health Laboratory , UMR BIPAR, ANSES Maisons-Alfort, Paris, France . · 7 Virology Unit, Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University , Ankara, Turkey . · 8 Division of Virology, Departments Hygiene, Microbiology and Social Medicine, Innsbruck Medical University , Innsbruck, Austria . ·Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis · Pubmed #28055576.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this review is to provide practical information to help researchers intending to perform "from field to laboratory" studies on phleboviruses transmitted by sandflies. This guideline addresses the different steps to be considered starting from the field collection of sandflies to the laboratory techniques aiming at the detection, isolation, and characterization of sandfly-borne phleboviruses. In this guideline article, we address the impact of various types of data for an optimal organization of the field work intending to collect wildlife sandflies for subsequent virology studies. Analysis of different data sets should result in the geographic positioning of the trapping stations. The overall planning, the equipment and tools needed, the manpower to be deployed, and the logistics to be anticipated and set up should be organized according to the objectives of the field study for optimal efficiency.

24 Guideline Guidelines for the Detection of Rickettsia spp. 2017

Portillo, Aránzazu / de Sousa, Rita / Santibáñez, Sonia / Duarte, Ana / Edouard, Sophie / Fonseca, Isabel P / Marques, Cátia / Novakova, Marketa / Palomar, Ana M / Santos, Marcos / Silaghi, Cornelia / Tomassone, Laura / Zúquete, Sara / Oteo, José A. ·1 Center of Rickettsiosis and Arthropod-Borne Diseases , Hospital San Pedro-CIBIR, Logroño, Spain . · 2 National Institute of Health Dr. Ricardo Jorge , Águas de Moura, Portugal . · 3 Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Lisbon , Lisbon, Portugal . · 4 Unité de Recherche sur les Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales Emergentes, Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire Méditerranée-Infection , Marseille, France . · 5 Department of Biology and Wildlife Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Hygiene and Ecology, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno , Brno, Czech Republic . · 6 CEITEC VFU, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno , Brno, Czech Republic . · 7 National Centre for Vector Entomology, Institute of Parasitology, University of Zurich , Zurich, Switzerland . · 8 Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Torino , Grugliasco, Italy . ·Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis · Pubmed #28055574.

ABSTRACT: The genus Rickettsia (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae) includes Gram-negative, small, obligate intracellular, nonmotile, pleomorphic coccobacilli bacteria transmitted by arthropods. Some of them cause human and probably also animal disease (life threatening in some patients). In these guidelines, we give clinical practice advices (microscopy, serology, molecular tools, and culture) for the microbiological study of these microorganisms in clinical samples. Since in our environment rickettsioses are mainly transmitted by ticks, practical information for the identification of these arthropods and for the study of Rickettsia infections in ticks has also been added.

25 Guideline Guidelines for the Detection of Babesia and Theileria Parasites. 2017

Lempereur, Laetitia / Beck, Relja / Fonseca, Isabel / Marques, Cátia / Duarte, Ana / Santos, Marcos / Zúquete, Sara / Gomes, Jacinto / Walder, Gernot / Domingos, Ana / Antunes, Sandra / Baneth, Gad / Silaghi, Cornelia / Holman, Patricia / Zintl, Annetta. ·1 Laboratory of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège , Liège, Belgium . · 2 Laboratory for Parasitology, Croatian Veterinary Institute , Zagreb, Croatia . · 3 Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Animal Health, University of Lisbon , Lisbon, Portugal . · 4 National Institute for Agrarian and Veterinary Research , Oeiras, Portugal . · 5 Department of Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, Innsbruck Medical University , Innsbruck, Austria . · 6 Global Health and Tropical Medicine, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical (IHMT) , Lisbon, Portugal . · 7 Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Hebrew University , Rehovot, Israel . · 8 National Centre for Vector Entomology, Institute of Parasitology, University of Zurich , Zurich, Switzerland . · 9 Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University , College Station, Texas. · 10 UCD Veterinary Sciences Centre, University College Dublin , Belfield, Dublin, Ireland . ·Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis · Pubmed #28055573.

ABSTRACT: The genera Babesia and Theileria (phylum Apicomplexa, order Piroplasmida) are mainly transmitted by Ixodid ticks in which the sexual part of their life cycle followed by sporogony takes place. They include protozoan parasites that infect erythrocytes of a variety of vertebrate hosts, including domestic and wild animals, with some Babesia spp. also infecting humans. Babesia sporozoites transmitted in the tick's saliva during the bloodmeal directly infect erythrocytes, where they asexually multiply to produce pear-shaped merozoites in the process of merogony; whereas a pre-erythrocytic schizogonic life stage in leukocytes is found in Theileria and precedes merogony in the erythrocytes. The wide spectrum of Babesia and Theileria species and their dissimilar characteristics with relation to disease severity, transmission, epidemiology, and drug susceptibility stress the importance of accurate detection of babesiosis and theileriosis and their causative agents. These guidelines review the main methods currently used for the detection of Babesia and Theileria spp. for diagnostic purposes as well as epidemiological studies involving their vertebrate hosts and arthropod vectors. Serological methods were not included once they did not indicate current infection but rather exposure.

Next