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Coronary Artery Disease HELP
Based on 33,667 articles published since 2007
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These are the 33667 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from Worldwide during 2007-2017.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand position statement executive summary: coronary artery calcium scoring. 2017

Hamilton-Craig, Christian R / Chow, Clara K / Younger, John F / Jelinek, V M / Chan, Jonathan / Liew, Gary Yh. ·Heart and Lung Institute, The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, QLD c.hamiltoncraig@uq.edu.au. · The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, NSW. · Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD. · St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC. · Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD. · University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA. ·Med J Aust · Pubmed #29020908.

ABSTRACT: Introduction This article summarises the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand position statement on coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring. CAC scoring is a non-invasive method for quantifying coronary artery calcification using computed tomography. It is a marker of atherosclerotic plaque burden and the strongest independent predictor of future myocardial infarction and mortality. CAC scoring provides incremental risk information beyond traditional risk calculators such as the Framingham Risk Score. Its use for risk stratification is confined to primary prevention of cardiovascular events, and can be considered as individualised coronary risk scoring for intermediate risk patients, allowing reclassification to low or high risk based on the score. Medical practitioners should carefully counsel patients before CAC testing, which should only be undertaken if an alteration in therapy, including embarking on pharmacotherapy, is being considered based on the test result. Main recommendations CAC scoring should primarily be performed on individuals without coronary disease aged 45-75 years (absolute 5-year cardiovascular risk of 10-15%) who are asymptomatic. CAC scoring is also reasonable in lower risk groups (absolute 5-year cardiovascular risk, < 10%) where risk scores traditionally underestimate risk (eg, family history of premature CVD) and in patients with diabetes aged 40-60 years. We recommend aspirin and a high efficacy statin in high risk patients, defined as those with a CAC score ≥ 400, or a CAC score of 100-399 and above the 75th percentile for age and sex. It is reasonable to treat patients with CAC scores ≥ 100 with aspirin and a statin. It is reasonable not to treat asymptomatic patients with a CAC score of zero. Changes in management as a result of this statement Cardiovascular risk is reclassified according to CAC score. High risk patients are treated with a high efficacy statin and aspirin. Very low risk patients (ie, CAC score of zero) do not benefit from treatment.

2 Guideline 2017 Focused Update of the 2016 ACC Expert Consensus Decision Pathway on the Role of Non-Statin Therapies for LDL-Cholesterol Lowering in the Management of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Task Force on Expert Consensus Decision Pathways. 2017

Lloyd-Jones, Donald M / Morris, Pamela B / Ballantyne, Christie M / Birtcher, Kim K / Daly, David D / DePalma, Sondra M / Minissian, Margo B / Orringer, Carl E / Smith, Sidney C. · ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #28886926.

ABSTRACT: In 2016, the American College of Cardiology published the first expert consensus decision pathway (ECDP) on the role of non-statin therapies for low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol lowering in the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk. Since the publication of that document, additional evidence and perspectives have emerged from randomized clinical trials and other sources, particularly considering the longer-term efficacy and safety of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors in secondary prevention of ASCVD. Most notably, the FOURIER (Further Cardiovascular Outcomes Research with PCSK9 Inhibition in Subjects with Elevated Risk) trial and SPIRE-1 and -2 (Studies of PCSK9 Inhibition and the Reduction of Vascular Events), assessing evolocumab and bococizumab, respectively, have published final results of cardiovascular outcomes trials in patients with clinical ASCVD and in a smaller number of high-risk primary prevention patients. In addition, further evidence on the types of patients most likely to benefit from the use of ezetimibe in addition to statin therapy after acute coronary syndrome has been published. Based on results from these important analyses, the ECDP writing committee judged that it would be desirable to provide a focused update to help guide clinicians more clearly on decision making regarding the use of ezetimibe and PCSK9 inhibitors in patients with clinical ASCVD with or without comorbidities. In the following summary table, changes from the 2016 ECDP to the 2017 ECDP Focused Update are highlighted, and a brief rationale is provided. The content of the full document has been changed accordingly, with more extensive and detailed guidance regarding decision making provided both in the text and in the updated algorithms. Revised recommendations are provided for patients with clinical ASCVD with or without comorbidities on statin therapy for secondary prevention. The ECDP writing committee judged that these new data did not warrant changes to the decision pathways and algorithms regarding the use of ezetimibe or PCSK9 inhibitors in primary prevention patients with LDL-C <190 mg/dL with or without diabetes mellitus or patients without ASCVD and LDL-C ≥190 mg/dL not due to secondary causes. Based on feedback and further deliberation, the ECDP writing committee down-graded recommendations regarding bile acid sequestrant use, recommending bile acid sequestrants only as optional secondary agents for consideration in patients intolerant to ezetimibe. For clarification, the writing committee has also included new information on diagnostic categories of heterozygous and homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, based on clinical criteria with and without genetic testing. Other changes to the original document were kept to a minimum to provide consistent guidance to clinicians, unless there was a compelling reason or new evidence, in which case justification is provided.

3 Guideline Clinical indications for coronary artery calcium scoring in asymptomatic patients: Expert consensus statement from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. 2017

Hecht, Harvey / Blaha, Michael J / Berman, Daniel S / Nasir, Khurram / Budoff, Matthew / Leipsic, Jonathon / Blankstein, Ron / Narula, Jagat / Rumberger, John / Shaw, Leslee J. ·Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai St. Luke's Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: hhecht@aol.com. · The Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, FL, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USA. · Department of Medicine and Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Non-Invasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine (Cardiovascular Division) and Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai St. Luke's Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · The Princeton Longevity Center, Princeton, NJ, USA. · Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #28283309.

ABSTRACT: This expert consensus statement summarizes the available data regarding the prognostic value of CAC in the asymptomatic population and its ability to refine individual risk prediction, addresses the limitations identified in the current traditional risk factor-based treatment strategies recommended by the 2013 ACC/AHA Prevention guidelines including use of the Pooled Cohort Equations (PCE), and the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) Recommendation Statement for Statin Use for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Adults. It provides CAC based treatment recommendations both within the context of the shared decision making model espoused by the 2013 ACC/AHA Prevention guidelines and independent of these guidelines.

4 Guideline Clinical Pharmacogenetic Testing and Application: Laboratory Medicine Clinical Practice Guidelines. 2017

Kim, Sollip / Yun, Yeo Min / Chae, Hyo Jin / Cho, Hyun Jung / Ji, Misuk / Kim, In Suk / Wee, Kyung A / Lee, Woochang / Song, Sang Hoon / Woo, Hye In / Lee, Soo Youn / Chun, Sail. ·Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Konyang University Hospital, College of Medicine, Konyang University, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Veterans Health Service Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital and College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Changwon, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Genetics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. suddenbz@skku.edu. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. sailchun@amc.seoul.kr. ·Ann Lab Med · Pubmed #28029011.

ABSTRACT: Pharmacogenetic testing for clinical applications is steadily increasing. Correct and adequate use of pharmacogenetic tests is important to reduce unnecessary medical costs and adverse patient outcomes. This document contains recommended pharmacogenetic testing guidelines for clinical application, interpretation, and result reporting through a literature review and evidence-based expert opinions for the clinical pharmacogenetic testing covered by public medical insurance in Korea. This document aims to improve the utility of pharmacogenetic testing in routine clinical settings.

5 Guideline 2016 SCCT/STR guidelines for coronary artery calcium scoring of noncontrast noncardiac chest CT scans: A report of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography and Society of Thoracic Radiology. 2017

Hecht, Harvey S / Cronin, Paul / Blaha, Michael J / Budoff, Matthew J / Kazerooni, Ella A / Narula, Jagat / Yankelevitz, David / Abbara, Suhny. ·Lenox Hill Heart & Vascular Institute, New York, NY, United States. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States. · Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States. · Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, United States. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, NY, United States. · The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, United States. · UTSouthwestern Medical Center, Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blv, Dallas, TX 75390-9316, United States. Electronic address: suhny.abbara@utsouthwestern.edu. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #27916431.

ABSTRACT: The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) and the Society of Thoracic Radiology (STR) have jointly produced this document. Experts in this subject have been selected from both organizations to examine subject-specific data and write this guideline in partnership. A formal literature review, weighing the strength of evidence has been performed. When available, information from studies on cost was considered. Computed tomography (CT) acquisition, CAC scoring methodologies and clinical outcomes are the primary basis for the recommendations in this guideline. This guideline is intended to assist healthcare providers in clinical decision making. The recommendations reflect a consensus after a thorough review of the best available current scientific evidence and practice patterns of experts in the field and are intended to improve patient care while acknowledging that situations arise where additional information may be needed to better inform patient care.

6 Guideline The Rationale for Performance of Coronary Angiography and Stenting Before Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: From the Interventional Section Leadership Council of the American College of Cardiology. 2016

Ramee, Stephen / Anwaruddin, Saif / Kumar, Gautam / Piana, Robert N / Babaliaros, Vasilis / Rab, Tanveer / Klein, Lloyd W / Anonymous3921359 / Anonymous3931359. ·Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana. · Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Emory University/Atlanta VA Medical Center, Atlanta, Georgia. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois. Electronic address: lloydklein@comcast.net. · ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27931592.

ABSTRACT: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an effective, nonsurgical treatment option for patients with severe aortic stenosis. The optimal treatment strategy for treating concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been tested prospectively in a randomized clinical trial. Nevertheless, it is standard practice in the United States to perform coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention for significant CAD at least 1 month before TAVR. All existing clinical trials were designed using this strategy. Therefore, it is wrong to extrapolate current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Appropriate Use Criteria against invasive procedures in asymptomatic patients to the TAVR population when evaluating the quality of care by cardiologists or hospitals. In this statement from the Interventional Section Leadership Council of the ACC, it is recommended that percutaneous coronary intervention should be considered in all patients with significant proximal coronary stenosis in major coronary arteries before TAVR, even though the indication is not covered in current guidelines.

7 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 8 - Hypertension and Associated Clinical Conditions 2016

Malachias, M V B / Amodeo, C / Paula, R B / Cordeiro, A C / Magalhães, L B N C / Bodanese, L C. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819387.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Guideline Antithrombotic Therapy in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A North American Perspective-2016 Update. 2016

Angiolillo, Dominick J / Goodman, Shaun G / Bhatt, Deepak L / Eikelboom, John W / Price, Matthew J / Moliterno, David J / Cannon, Christopher P / Tanguay, Jean-Francois / Granger, Christopher B / Mauri, Laura / Holmes, David R / Gibson, C Michael / Faxon, David P. ·From the Division of Cardiology, University of Florida College of Medicine-Jacksonville (D.J.A.); St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, and the Canadian Heart Research Centre; Canadian VIGOUR Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton (S.G.G.); Brigham and Women's Hospital Heart & Vascular Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (D.L.B., D.P.F.); Department of Medicine, Population Health Research Institute, Thrombosis & Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton, ON, Canada (J.W.E.); Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Scripps Clinic, La Jolla CA (M.J.P.); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Gill Heart Institute, University of Kentucky, Lexington (D.J.M.); Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Clinical Research Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (C.P.C., L.M.); Department of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, QC, Canada (J.-F.T.); Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC (C.B.G.); Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (D.R.H.); and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (C.M.G.). dominick.angiolillo@jax.ufl.edu. · From the Division of Cardiology, University of Florida College of Medicine-Jacksonville (D.J.A.); St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, and the Canadian Heart Research Centre; Canadian VIGOUR Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton (S.G.G.); Brigham and Women's Hospital Heart & Vascular Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (D.L.B., D.P.F.); Department of Medicine, Population Health Research Institute, Thrombosis & Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton, ON, Canada (J.W.E.); Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Scripps Clinic, La Jolla CA (M.J.P.); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Gill Heart Institute, University of Kentucky, Lexington (D.J.M.); Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Clinical Research Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (C.P.C., L.M.); Department of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, QC, Canada (J.-F.T.); Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC (C.B.G.); Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (D.R.H.); and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (C.M.G.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27803042.

ABSTRACT: The optimal antithrombotic treatment regimen for patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation is an emerging clinical problem. Currently, there is limited evidenced-based data on the optimal antithrombotic treatment regimen, including antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies, for these high-risk patients with practice guidelines, thus, providing limited recommendations. Over the past years, expert consensus documents have provided guidance to clinicians on how to manage patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Given the recent advancements in the field, the current document provides an updated opinion of selected North American experts from the United States and Canada on the treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. In particular, this document provides the current views on (1) embolic/stroke risk, (2) ischemic/thrombotic cardiac risk, and (3) bleeding risk, which are pivotal for discerning the choice of antithrombotic therapy. In addition, we describe the recent advances in pharmacology, stent designs, and clinical trials relevant to the field. Ultimately, we provide expert consensus-derived recommendations, using a pragmatic approach, on the management of patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

9 Guideline SCCT guidelines for the performance and acquisition of coronary computed tomographic angiography: A report of the society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee: Endorsed by the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging (NASCI). 2016

Abbara, Suhny / Blanke, Philipp / Maroules, Christopher D / Cheezum, Michael / Choi, Andrew D / Han, B Kelly / Marwan, Mohamed / Naoum, Chris / Norgaard, Bjarne L / Rubinshtein, Ronen / Schoenhagen, Paul / Villines, Todd / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States. Electronic address: Suhny.Abbara@UTSouthwestern.edu. · Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States. · Cardiology Service Ft. Belvoir Community Hospital, Ft. Belvoir, VA, United States. · Division of Cardiology and Department of Radiology, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington DC, United States. · Minneapolis Heart Institute and Children's Heart Clinic, Minneapolis, MN, United States. · Cardiology Department, University Hospital, Erlangen, Germany. · Concord Hospital, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Cardiology B, Aarhus University Hospital-Skejby, Aarhus N, Denmark. · Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center & Rappaport School of Medicine- Technion- IIT, Haifa, Israel. · Cardiovascular Imaging, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, United States. · Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, United States. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #27780758.

ABSTRACT: In response to recent technological advancements in acquisition techniques as well as a growing body of evidence regarding the optimal performance of coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA), the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee has produced this update to its previously established 2009 "Guidelines for the Performance of Coronary CTA" (1). The purpose of this document is to provide standards meant to ensure reliable practice methods and quality outcomes based on the best available data in order to improve the diagnostic care of patients. Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines for the Interpretation is published separately (2). The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee ensures compliance with all existing standards for the declaration of conflict of interest by all authors and reviewers for the purpose ofclarity and transparency.

10 Guideline [SICI-GISE Position paper: Use of Absorb BVS in clinical practice]. 2016

Tarantini, Giuseppe / Saia, Francesco / Capranzano, Piera / Cortese, Bernardo / Mojoli, Marco / Boccuzzi, Giacomo / Cuculo, Andrea / Geraci, Salvatore / Mattesini, Alessio / Oreglia, Jacopo / Summaria, Francesco / Testa, Luca / Berti, Sergio / Esposito, Giovanni / La Manna, Alessio / Limbruno, Ugo / Marchese, Alfredo / Mauro, Ciro / Tarantino, Fabio / Salvi, Alessandro / Santoro, Gennaro / Varbella, Ferdinando / Violini, Roberto / Musumeci, Giuseppe. ·Dipartimento di Scienze Cardiologiche, Toraciche e Vascolari, Policlinico Universitario, Padova. · Dipartimento Cardio-Toraco-Vascolare, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna. · Dipartimento Cardiovascolare, Ospedale Ferrarotto, Università degli Studi, Catania. · Cardiologia Interventistica, A.O. Fatebenefratelli, Milano. · Cardiologia Interventistica, Azienda Sanitaria Locale Torino 2, Torino. · Dipartimento di Cardiologia, A.O. Ospedali Riuniti, Foggia. · Cardiologia Interventistica, Ospedale S. Giovanni di Dio, Agrigento. · Cardiologia Interventistica, Ospedale Moriggia Pelascini, Gravedona (CO). · Emodinamica, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milano. · Dipartimento di Cardiologia, Policlinico Casilino, Roma. · Dipartimento di Cardiologia, IRCCS Policlinico S. Donato, S. Donato Milanese (MI). · U.O. Cardiologia Diagnostica ed Interventistica, Fondazione Toscana "Gabriele Monasterio", Ospedale del Cuore, Massa. · Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche Avanzate, Università degli Studi "Federico II", Napoli. · U.O.C. Cardiologia, Azienda USL Toscana Sudest, Grosseto. · U.O.C. Cardiologia Interventistica, Anthea Hospital, GVM Care & Research, Bari. · Dipartimento Cardiovascolare, Ospedale Cardarelli, Napoli. · Laboratorio di Emodinamica, U.O. Cardiologia, Ospedale G.B. Morgagni-L. Pierantoni, Forlì. · Dipartimento Cardiovascolare, Ospedali Riuniti, Università degli Studi, Trieste. · Cardiologia Interventistica, AOU Careggi, Firenze. · Dipartimento di Cardiologia, Ospedale degli Infermi, Rivoli (TO). · Cardiologia Interventistica, Ospedale S. Camillo-Forlanini, Roma. · Dipartimento Cardiovascolare, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo. ·G Ital Cardiol (Rome) · Pubmed #27729667.

ABSTRACT: Drug-eluting stents (DES) are the current gold standard for percutaneous treatment of coronary artery disease. However, DES are associated with a non-negligible risk of long-term adverse events related to persistence of foreign material in the coronary artery wall. In addition, DES implantation causes permanent caging of the native vessel, thus impairing normal vasomotricity and the possibility of using non-invasive coronary imaging or preforming subsequent bypass surgery. On the contrary, coronary bioresorbable stents (BRS) may provide temporary mechanical support to coronary wall without compromising the subsequent recovery of normal vascular physiology, and have the potential to prevent late adverse events related to permanent elements. Several types of BRS have been introduced into clinical practice in Europe or are being tested. However, most of available clinical data relate to a single BRS, the Absorb bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold (Absorb BVS) (Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, CA). Despite encouraging clinical results, no societal guidelines are available on the use of BRS in clinical practice.A panel of Italian expert cardiologists assembled under the auspices of the Italian Society of Interventional Cardiology (SICI-GISE) for comprehensive discussion and consensus development, with the aim to provide recommendations on the use of bioresorbable stents in terms of clinical indications, procedural aspects, post-percutaneous coronary angioplasty pharmacologic treatment and follow-up. Based on current evidence and BRS availability in Italian cath-labs, the panel decided unanimously to provide specific recommendations for the Absorb BVS device. These recommendations do not necessarily extend to other BRS, unless specified, although significant overlap may exist with Absorb BVS, particularly in terms of clinical rationale.

11 Guideline 2016 Focused Update of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines for the Management of Atrial Fibrillation. 2016

Macle, Laurent / Cairns, John / Leblanc, Kori / Tsang, Teresa / Skanes, Allan / Cox, Jafna L / Healey, Jeff S / Bell, Alan / Pilote, Louise / Andrade, Jason G / Mitchell, L Brent / Atzema, Clare / Gladstone, David / Sharma, Mike / Verma, Subodh / Connolly, Stuart / Dorian, Paul / Parkash, Ratika / Talajic, Mario / Nattel, Stanley / Verma, Atul / Anonymous5891356. ·Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address: lmacle@mac.com. · University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · London Heart Institute, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · QEII Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · McMaster University and Hamilton General Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, and Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · McMaster University and Hamilton General Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; The Canadian Stroke Network, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario, Canada. · ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #27609430.

ABSTRACT: The Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Guidelines Committee provides periodic reviews of new data to produce focused updates that address clinically important advances in AF management. This 2016 Focused Update deals with: (1) the management of antithrombotic therapy for AF patients in the context of the various clinical presentations of coronary artery disease; (2) real-life data with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; (3) the use of antidotes for the reversal of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; (4) digoxin as a rate control agent; (5) perioperative anticoagulation management; and (6) AF surgical therapy including the prevention and treatment of AF after cardiac surgery. The recommendations were developed with the same methodology used for the initial 2010 guidelines and the 2012 and 2014 Focused Updates. Using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) standards, individual studies and literature were reviewed for quality and bias; the literature review process and evidence tables are included in the Supplementary Material, and on the CCS Web site. The section on concomitant AF and coronary artery disease was developed in collaboration with the CCS Antiplatelet Guidelines Committee. Details of the updated recommendations are presented, along with their background and rationale. This document is linked to an updated summary of all CCS AF Guidelines recommendations, from 2010 to the present 2016 Focused Update.

12 Guideline Coronary Artery Disease - Reporting and Data System (CAD-RADS): An Expert Consensus Document of SCCT, ACR and NASCI: Endorsed by the ACC. 2016

Cury, Ricardo C / Abbara, Suhny / Achenbach, Stephan / Agatston, Arthur / Berman, Daniel S / Budoff, Matthew J / Dill, Karin E / Jacobs, Jill E / Maroules, Christopher D / Rubin, Geoffrey D / Rybicki, Frank J / Schoepf, U Joseph / Shaw, Leslee J / Stillman, Arthur E / White, Charles S / Woodard, Pamela K / Leipsic, Jonathon A. · ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27609151.

ABSTRACT: The intent of CAD-RADS - Coronary Artery Disease Reporting and Data System is to create a standardized method to communicate findings of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) in order to facilitate decision-making regarding further patient management. The suggested CAD-RADS classification is applied on a per-patient basis and represents the highest-grade coronary artery lesion documented by coronary CTA. It ranges from CAD-RADS 0 (Zero) for the complete absence of stenosis and plaque to CAD-RADS 5 for the presence of at least one totally occluded coronary artery and should always be interpreted in conjunction with the impression found in the report. Specific recommendations are provided for further management of patients with stable or acute chest pain based on the CAD-RADS classification. The main goal of CAD-RADS is to standardize reporting of coronary CTA results and to facilitate communication of test results to referring physicians along with suggestions for subsequent patient management. In addition, CAD-RADS will provide a framework of standardization that may benefit education, research, peer-review and quality assurance with the potential to ultimately result in improved quality of care.

13 Guideline [The heart team in planning and performance of revascularization : ESC guidelines versus clinical routine]. 2016

Sinning, J-M / Welz, A / Nickenig, G. ·Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik II, Herzzentrum der Universität Bonn, Universitätsklinikum Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105, Bonn, Deutschland. jan-malte.sinning@ukb.uni-bonn.de. · Klinik für Herzchirurgie, Herzzentrum der Universität Bonn, Universitätsklinikum Bonn, Bonn, Deutschland. · Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik II, Herzzentrum der Universität Bonn, Universitätsklinikum Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105, Bonn, Deutschland. ·Herz · Pubmed #27596003.

ABSTRACT: The heart team, consisting of conservative cardiologists, cardiac surgeons and interventional cardiologists, is important for a balanced, multidisciplinary decision-making process for patients suffering from coronary artery disease (CAD). Standard evidence-based, interdisciplinary, institutional protocols can be used for commonly encountered case scenarios to avoid the need for a systematic case by case review. Complex cases with a SYNTAX score of more than 32, diabetes mellitus and lesions of the left main stem or three-vessel disease should in general not be treated by an ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) but first discussed in the heart team. Culprit lesion PCI is usually the first choice in most patients with acute coronary syndrome. If complete percutaneous revascularization is not possible, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) should be considered by the heart team. In patients assigned for CABG, timing of the procedure should be decided on an individual basis, depending on the symptoms, hemodynamic stability, coronary anatomy and signs of ischemia. In stabilized patients with acute coronary syndrome, the choice of revascularization modality can be made in analogy to patients with stable CAD.

14 Guideline CAD-RADS(TM) Coronary Artery Disease - Reporting and Data System. An expert consensus document of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT), the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging (NASCI). Endorsed by the American College of Cardiology. 2016

Cury, Ricardo C / Abbara, Suhny / Achenbach, Stephan / Agatston, Arthur / Berman, Daniel S / Budoff, Matthew J / Dill, Karin E / Jacobs, Jill E / Maroules, Christopher D / Rubin, Geoffrey D / Rybicki, Frank J / Schoepf, U Joseph / Shaw, Leslee J / Stillman, Arthur E / White, Charles S / Woodard, Pamela K / Leipsic, Jonathon A. ·Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Hospital of Miami, 8900 N Kendall Drive, Miami, FL, 33176, United States. Electronic address: rcury@baptisthealth.net. · Department of Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX, 75390, United States. Electronic address: Suhny.Abbara@UTSouthwestern.edu. · Friedrich-Alexander-Universität, Erlangen-Nürnberg, Department of Cardiology, Ulmenweg 18, 90154, Erlangen, Germany. Electronic address: Stephan.Achenbach@uk-erlangen.de. · Baptist Health Medical Grp, 1691 Michigan Avenue, Miami, FL, 33139, United States. Electronic address: ArthurSAg@baptisthealth.net. · Cedars-Sinai Med Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Taper Building, Rm 1258, Los Angeles, CA, 90048, United States. Electronic address: bermand@cshs.org. · 1124 W. Carson Street, Torrance, CA, 90502, United States. Electronic address: mbudoff@labiomed.org. · 5841 South Maryland Ave, MC2026, Chicago, IL, 60637, United States. Electronic address: kdill@radiology.bsd.uchicago.edu. · 550 First Avenue, New York, NY, 10016, United States. Electronic address: jill.jacobs@nyumc.org. · Department of Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX, 75390, United States. Electronic address: christopher.maroules@gmail.com. · 2400 Pratt Street, Room 8020, DCRI Box 17969, Durham, NC, 27715, United States. Electronic address: grubin@duke.edu. · The Ottawa Hospital General Campus, 501 Smyth Rd, Ottawa, ON, CA K1H 8L6, Canada. Electronic address: frybicki@toh.on.ca. · 25 Courtenay Dr., Charleston, SC, 29425, United States. Electronic address: schoepf@musc.edu. · 1256 Briarcliff Rd. NE, Rm 529, Atlanta, GA, 30324, United States. Electronic address: lshaw3@emory.edu. · 1364 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322, United States. Electronic address: aestill@emory.edu. · University of Maryland, 22 S. Greene St., Baltimore, MD, 21201, United States. Electronic address: cwhite@umm.edu. · Mallinckrodt Instit of Radiology, 510 S Kingshighway Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63110, United States. Electronic address: woodardp@mir.wustl.edu. · Department of Radiology|St. Paul's Hospital, 2nd Floor, Providence Building, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z 1Y6, United States. Electronic address: jleipsic@providencehealth.bc.ca. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #27318587.

ABSTRACT: The intent of CAD-RADS - Coronary Artery Disease Reporting and Data System is to create a standardized method to communicate findings of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) in order to facilitate decision-making regarding further patient management. The suggested CAD-RADS classification is applied on a per-patient basis and represents the highest-grade coronary artery lesion documented by coronary CTA. It ranges from CAD-RADS 0 (Zero) for the complete absence of stenosis and plaque to CAD-RADS 5 for the presence of at least one totally occluded coronary artery and should always be interpreted in conjunction with the impression found in the report. Specific recommendations are provided for further management of patients with stable or acute chest pain based on the CAD-RADS classification. The main goal of CAD-RADS is to standardize reporting of coronary CTA results and to facilitate communication of test results to referring physicians along with suggestions for subsequent patient management. In addition, CAD-RADS will provide a framework of standardization that may benefit education, research, peer-review and quality assurance with the potential to ultimately result in improved quality of care.

15 Guideline SCAI expert consensus statement: 2016 best practices in the cardiac catheterization laboratory: (Endorsed by the cardiological society of india, and sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia intervencionista; Affirmation of value by the Canadian Association of interventional cardiology-Association canadienne de cardiologie d'intervention). 2016

Naidu, Srihari S / Aronow, Herbert D / Box, Lyndon C / Duffy, Peter L / Kolansky, Daniel M / Kupfer, Joel M / Latif, Faisal / Mulukutla, Suresh R / Rao, Sunil V / Swaminathan, Rajesh V / Blankenship, James C. ·Division of Cardiology, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, New York. ssnaidu@winthrop.org. · Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Cardiovascular Institute, Providence, RI. · West Valley Medical Center, Caldwell, ID. · FirstHealth of the Carolinas, Pinehurst, NC. · Cardiovascular Medicine Division, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · University of Illinois School of Medicine-Peoria, Peoria, IL. · University of Oklahoma and VA Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK. · University of Pittsburgh and VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC. · Weill Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Greenberg Division of Cardiology, New York, NY. · Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27137680.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Guideline [SICI-GISE position paper on standards and guidelines for diagnostic and catheterization laboratories]. 2015

Piccaluga, Emanuela / Marchese, Alfredo / Varbella, Ferdinando / Sardella, Gennaro / Danzi, Gian Battista / Salvi, Alessandro / Cremonesi, Alberto / Merelli, Antonella / Ciarma, Lorenzo / Magro, Beatrice / Bedogni, Francesco / Anonymous3210845. ·Cardiologia 1-Emodinamica, A.O. Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Milano. · U.O. Cardiologia Interventistica, Anthea Hospital, GVM Care & Research, Bari. · Dipartimento di Cardiologia, Ospedale degli Infermi, Rivoli (TO). · Dipartimento di Scienze Cardiovascolari, Respiratorie, Nefrologiche, Anestesiologiche e Geriatriche, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma. · U.O. Cardiologia, Ospedale Santa Corona, Pietra Ligure (SV). · Emodinamica Diagnostica e Interventistica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria "Ospedali Riuniti", Trieste. · Laboratorio di Cardio-Angiologia Diagnostica ed Interventistica, Maria Cecilia Hospital, GVM Care & Research, Cotignola (RA). · U.O. Cardiologia 2, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa. · U.O. Emodinamica, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna. · UOSD Diagnostica ed Interventistica Cardiovascolare Endoluminale, Ospedale Civile "S. Maria della Misericordia", ULSS 18, Rovigo. · Dipartimento di Cardiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese (MI). · ·G Ital Cardiol (Rome) · Pubmed #26444219.

ABSTRACT: In the last few years, the activity of cath labs has undergone some notable changes, at present largely focusing on diagnosis and invasive therapy of a broad spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. Technological and pharmacological advances have allowed for procedures to be performed in patients who are increasingly complex, and cath labs have become the preferred venue for endovascular treatment of coronary artery disease, in particular acute coronary syndrome, as well as the treatment of structural heart disease and peripheral vascular disease. This position paper is an update of the 1996 and 2008 versions, given the present level of experience and the situation in Italy. It aims to provide the quality standards required to maintain adequate conditions of know-how and safety, as well as the structural and organizational requirements that are fundamental to obtain the best possible use of human and technological resources. Position papers should be a stimulus and guide for operators in the field as well as for those who govern health policies. This should allow for an improved and more rational allocation of cath labs in Italy, based on the real need for procedures and an optimal distribution and organization of the cardiovascular emergency networks while respecting the minimum standards of care.

17 Guideline [Position paper of the Italian Society of Invasive Cardiology (SICI-GISE) on indications for coronary angiography in patients with stable angina]. 2015

Marchese, Alfredo / Rossini, Roberta / Basile, Marco / Bedogni, Francesco / Danzi, Gian Battista / Musumeci, Giuseppe / Paradies, Valeria / Piccaluga, Emanuela / Sardella, Gennaro / Varbella, Ferdinando / Giordano, Arturo / Berti, Sergio / Anonymous3220845. ·U.O.C. Cardiologia Interventistica, Anthea Hospital, GVM Care & Research, Bari. · Dipartimento Cardiovascolare, A.O. Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo. · Dipartimento di Cardiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese (MI). · U.O. Cardiologia, Ospedale Santa Corona, Pietra Ligure (SV). · Cardiologia 1-Emodinamica, A.O. Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Milano. · Dipartimento di Scienze Cardiovascolari, Respiratorie, Nefrologiche, Anestesiologiche e Geriatriche, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma. · Dipartimento di Cardiologia, Ospedale degli Infermi, Rivoli (TO). · U.O.C. Cardiologia Interventistica, Clinica Pineta Grande, Castel Volturno (CE). · U.O. Cardiologia Diagnostica ed Interventistica, Fondazione Toscana "Gabriele Monasterio", Ospedale del Cuore, Massa. · ·G Ital Cardiol (Rome) · Pubmed #26444218.

ABSTRACT: Available data suggest a steep increase in stable coronary artery disease with age. Its prevalence reaches a peak of almost 12-14% in men aged 65-84 years with an annual mortality ranging from 1.2% to 2.4%. The diagnosis of stable angina is primarily based on history and therefore relies on clinical judgment. In addition, its diagnosis can be extremely challenging because of the frequent transition from unstable to stable angina. Current European guidelines on the management of stable coronary artery disease give increased importance to the pre-test probability, which strongly affects the diagnostic algorithms. Imaging techniques play a greater role in the diagnosis of stable angina than in the past. Conversely, despite recent advances in technology and in the physiological assessment of coronary stenosis, an ever decreasing relevance is conferred to coronary angiography. Another difficult and controversial issue relates to the prognostic benefit of myocardial revascularization. The aim of this position paper is to review the most relevant clinical aspects of the European guidelines on the management of stable coronary artery disease.

18 Guideline Updated European Heart Rhythm Association Practical Guide on the use of non-vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. 2015

Heidbuchel, Hein / Verhamme, Peter / Alings, Marco / Antz, Matthias / Diener, Hans-Christoph / Hacke, Werner / Oldgren, Jonas / Sinnaeve, Peter / Camm, A John / Kirchhof, Paulus. · ·Europace · Pubmed #26324838.

ABSTRACT: The current manuscript is an update of the original Practical Guide, published in June 2013[Heidbuchel H, Verhamme P, Alings M, Antz M, Hacke W, Oldgren J, et al. European Heart Rhythm Association Practical Guide on the use of new oral anticoagulants in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Europace 2013;15:625-51; Heidbuchel H, Verhamme P, Alings M, Antz M, Hacke W, Oldgren J, et al. EHRA practical guide on the use of new oral anticoagulants in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: executive summary. Eur Heart J 2013;34:2094-106]. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are an alternative for vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) to prevent stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). Both physicians and patients have to learn how to use these drugs effectively and safely in clinical practice. Many unresolved questions on how to optimally use these drugs in specific clinical situations remain. The European Heart Rhythm Association set out to coordinate a unified way of informing physicians on the use of the different NOACs. A writing group defined what needs to be considered as 'non-valvular AF' and listed 15 topics of concrete clinical scenarios for which practical answers were formulated, based on available evidence. The 15 topics are (i) practical start-up and follow-up scheme for patients on NOACs; (ii) how to measure the anticoagulant effect of NOACs; (iii) drug-drug interactions and pharmacokinetics of NOACs; (iv) switching between anticoagulant regimens; (v) ensuring adherence of NOAC intake; (vi) how to deal with dosing errors; (vii) patients with chronic kidney disease; (viii) what to do if there is a (suspected) overdose without bleeding, or a clotting test is indicating a risk of bleeding?; (xi) management of bleeding complications; (x) patients undergoing a planned surgical intervention or ablation; (xi) patients undergoing an urgent surgical intervention; (xii) patients with AF and coronary artery disease; (xiii) cardioversion in a NOAC-treated patient; (xiv) patients presenting with acute stroke while on NOACs; and (xv) NOACs vs. VKAs in AF patients with a malignancy. Additional information and downloads of the text and anticoagulation cards in >16 languages can be found on an European Heart Rhythm Association web site (www.NOACforAF.eu).

19 Guideline 2015 ESC Guidelines for the management of patients with ventricular arrhythmias and the prevention of sudden cardiac death: The Task Force for the Management of Patients with Ventricular Arrhythmias and the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Endorsed by: Association for European Paediatric and Congenital Cardiology (AEPC). 2015

Priori, Silvia G / Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina / Mazzanti, Andrea / Blom, Nico / Borggrefe, Martin / Camm, John / Elliott, Perry Mark / Fitzsimons, Donna / Hatala, Robert / Hindricks, Gerhard / Kirchhof, Paulus / Kjeldsen, Keld / Kuck, Karl-Heinz / Hernandez-Madrid, Antonio / Nikolaou, Nikolaos / Norekvål, Tone M / Spaulding, Christian / Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J. · ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #26320108.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Guideline [Update on Current Care Guidelines. Current Care Guideline: Stable Coronary Artery Disease]. 2015

Porela, Pekka / Mäntylä, Pirjo / Blek-Vehkaluoto, Mari / Ilveskoski, Erkki / Juvonen, Tatu / Kujanpää, Tero / Loimaala, Antti / Meinander, Tuula / Mäenpää, Eliisa / Romppanen, Hannu / Saraste, Antti / Tierala, Ja Ilkka / Anonymous6050838. · ·Duodecim · Pubmed #26237876.

ABSTRACT: This guideline covers coronary heart disease symptoms, diagnosis and treatment. Stable coronary heart disease refers to a disease in, which patients have stable symptoms and evidence of ischemia or significant stenosis of coronary artery. Diagnosis is based on medical history and exercise test, which is the primary diagnostic test. Coronary angiography is in selected cases necessary to confirm the diagnosis and assess invasive treatment. Pharmacotherapy aims to improve the survival of the patient, relieve symptoms and improve quality of life. The guideline also deals with invasive treatment either with PCI or CABG.

21 Guideline Perspectives on the 2014 ESC/EACTS Guidelines on Myocardial Revascularization : Fifty Years of Revascularization: Where Are We and Where Are We Heading? 2015

Costa, Francesco / Ariotti, Sara / Valgimigli, Marco / Kolh, Philippe / Windecker, Stephan / Anonymous7360830. ·Thoraxcenter, Erasmus Medical Center, 3015 CE, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · ·J Cardiovasc Transl Res · Pubmed #25986910.

ABSTRACT: The joint European Society of Cardiology and European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (ESC/EACTS) guidelines on myocardial revascularization collect and summarize the evidence regarding decision-making, diagnostics, and therapeutics in various clinical scenarios of coronary artery disease, including elective, urgent, and emergency settings. The 2014 document updates and extends the effort started in 2010, year of the first edition of these guidelines. Importantly, this latest edition provides a systematic review of all randomized clinical trials performed since 1980, comparing different strategies of myocardial revascularization, including coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), balloon angioplasty, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with bare-metal stents (BMS) and first- and second-generation drug-eluting stents (DES). This review aims to highlight the most relevant novelties introduced by the 2014 edition of the ESC/EACTS myocardial revascularization guidelines as compared with the previous edition and to describe similarities and differences with the American societies' guidelines.

22 Guideline Treatment of hypertension in patients with coronary artery disease: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Society of Hypertension. 2015

Rosendorff, Clive / Lackland, Daniel T / Allison, Matthew / Aronow, Wilbert S / Black, Henry R / Blumenthal, Roger S / Cannon, Christopher P / de Lemos, James A / Elliott, William J / Findeiss, Laura / Gersh, Bernard J / Gore, Joel M / Levy, Daniel / Long, Janet B / O'Connor, Christopher M / O'Gara, Patrick T / Ogedegbe, Gbenga / Oparil, Suzanne / White, William B / Anonymous7990825. · ·Circulation · Pubmed #25829340.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Guideline Secondary prevention after coronary artery bypass graft surgery: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. 2015

Kulik, Alexander / Ruel, Marc / Jneid, Hani / Ferguson, T Bruce / Hiratzka, Loren F / Ikonomidis, John S / Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco / McNallan, Sheila M / Patel, Mahesh / Roger, Véronique L / Sellke, Frank W / Sica, Domenic A / Zimmerman, Lani / Anonymous1300821. · ·Circulation · Pubmed #25679302.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Guideline 2014 Korean guidelines for appropriate utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging: a joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology. 2014

Yoon, Yeonyee E / Hong, Yoo Jin / Kim, Hyung-Kwan / Kim, Jeong A / Na, Jin Oh / Yang, Dong Hyun / Kim, Young Jin / Choi, Eui-Young / The Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology, ?. ·Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752, Korea. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang 411-706, Korea. · Cardiovascular Center, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 152-703, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736, Korea. · Division of Cardiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 135-720, Korea. · ·Korean J Radiol · Pubmed #25469078.

ABSTRACT: Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is now widely used in several fields of cardiovascular disease assessment due to recent technical developments. CMR can give physicians information that cannot be found with other imaging modalities. However, there is no guideline which is suitable for Korean people for the use of CMR. Therefore, we have prepared a Korean guideline for the appropriate utilization of CMR to guide Korean physicians, imaging specialists, medical associates and patients to improve the overall medical system performances. By addressing CMR usage and creating these guidelines we hope to contribute towards the promotion of public health. This guideline is a joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology.

25 Guideline [Comments on the 2013 ESC/EASD guidelines on diabetes, prediabetes and cardiovascular diseases]. 2014

Motz, W / Kerner, W / Dörr, R / Anonymous271289 / Anonymous281289. ·Herz- und Diabeteszentrum Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Klinikum Karlsburg, Klinikgruppe Dr. Guth GmbH & Co. KG, Greifswalder Str. 11, 17495, Karlsburg, Deutschland, motz@drguth.de. · ·Herz · Pubmed #25416683.

ABSTRACT: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have an increased cardiovascular risk compared with non-diabetics. The new guidelines provide physicians with orientation with respect to disorders in glucose metabolism and the risk of occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. An HBA1c level in the range of 6-8% is currently recommended, depending on cardiovascular comorbidities: in young diabetics 6% is recommended to avoid hypoglycemia and in older individuals with cardiovascular complications 8%. The target blood pressure given in the new guidelines is <140/85 mmHg. The guidelines still recommend bypass surgery instead of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for diabetics; however, this recommendation is based on studies that do not reflect current practice and is disputable. Diagnostic measures and therapy of cardiac failure and arrhythmic disorders in the guidelines do not essentially differ between patients with and without diabetes, basically due to a lack of studies.

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