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Celiac Disease: HELP
Articles from Portland, OR
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
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These are the 5 published articles about Celiac Disease that originated from Portland, OR during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Screening for Celiac Disease: Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force. 2017

Chou, Roger / Bougatsos, Christina / Blazina, Ian / Mackey, Katherine / Grusing, Sara / Selph, Shelley. ·The Pacific Northwest Evidence-based Practice Center, Departments of Medicine and Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · The Pacific Northwest Evidence-based Practice Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · Division of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · The Pacific Northwest Evidence-based Practice Center, Departments of Family Medicine and Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. ·JAMA · Pubmed #28350935.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Silent or subclinical celiac disease may result in potentially avoidable adverse health consequences. Objective: To review the evidence on benefits and harms of screening for celiac disease in asymptomatic adults, adolescents, and children 3 years and older for the US Preventive Services Task Force. Data Sources: Ovid MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, searched to June 14, 2016. Study Selection: Randomized clinical trials and cohort or case-control studies on clinical benefits and harms of screening vs no screening for celiac disease or treatment vs no treatment for screen-detected celiac disease; studies on diagnostic accuracy of serologic tests for celiac disease. Data Extraction and Synthesis: One investigator abstracted data, a second checked data for accuracy, and 2 investigators independently assessed study quality using predefined criteria. Main Outcomes and Measures: Cancer incidence, gastrointestinal outcomes, psychological outcomes, child growth outcomes, health outcomes resulting from nutritional deficiencies, quality of life, mortality, and harms of screening. No meta-analytic pooling was done. Results: One systematic review and 3 primary studies met inclusion criteria. No trials of screening for celiac disease were identified. One recent, good-quality systematic review of 56 original studies and 12 previous systematic reviews (sample sizes of primary studies ranging from 62 to more than 12 000 participants) found IgA tissue transglutaminase was associated with high accuracy (sensitivity and specificity both >90%) for diagnosing celiac disease. IgA endomysial antibodies tests were associated with high specificity. Only 2 studies of serologic tests for celiac disease involving 62 and 158 patients were conducted in asymptomatic populations and reported lower sensitivity (57% and 71%). One fair-quality, small (n = 40) Finnish treatment trial of asymptomatic adults with screen-detected celiac disease based on positive serologic findings found initiation of a gluten-free diet associated with small improvement in gastrointestinal symptoms compared with no gluten-free diet (difference less than 1 point on a scale of 1 to 7) at 1 year, with no differences on most measures of quality of life. No withdrawals due to adverse events occurred during the trial; no other harms were reported. No studies were identified that addressed the other outcomes. Conclusions and Relevance: Although some evidence was found regarding diagnostic accuracy of tests for celiac disease, little or no evidence was identified to inform most of the key questions related to benefits and harms of screening for celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals. More research is needed to understand the effectiveness of screening and treatment for celiac disease, accuracy of screening tests in asymptomatic persons, and optimal screening strategies.

2 Article Associations of Microscopic Colitis With Other Lymphocytic Disorders of the Gastrointestinal Tract. 2018

Sonnenberg, Amnon / Turner, Kevin O / Genta, Robert M. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Portland VA Medical Center and Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon. Electronic address: sonnenbe@ohsu.edu. · Miraca Life Sciences, Irving, Texas. · Miraca Life Sciences, Irving, Texas; Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. ·Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #29535059.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Lymphocytic disorders of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract seem to cluster in patients. We aimed to assess the frequency of comorbid occurrence of lymphocytic disorders in patients with microscopic colitis (MC). METHODS: We collected data from the Miraca Life Sciences Database, a large national electronic repository of histopathologic records of patients throughout the United States. In a population of 228,506 patients who underwent bidirectional endoscopy from January 2008 through July 2016, we studied the comorbid occurrence of celiac disease, duodenal intraepithelial lymphocytosis, lymphocytic gastritis, and lymphocytic esophagitis among 3456 patients with MC. Associations were described in terms of their odds ratios (OR) and 95% CIs. RESULTS: Any type of lymphocytic disorder occurred in 13.7% of patients with MC and 5.9% of patients without MC. The ORs of lymphocytic disorders in patients with MC were: 2.56 (95% CI, 2.32-2.82) for any type of lymphocytic disorder, 3.07 (95% CI, 1.25-7.52) for lymphocytic esophagitis, 15.05 (95% CI, 12.31-18.41) for lymphocytic gastritis, 1.73 (95% CI, 1.53-21.96) for duodenal intraepithelial lymphocytosis, and 6.06 (95% CI, 5.06-7.25) for celiac disease. Comorbidities were more common in patients with lymphocytic than collagenous colitis, with an OR of 1.74 (95% CI, 1.42-2.13). Patients with MC with comorbidities were significantly younger and had a lower proportion of men than patients with MC patients without comorbidities. Diarrhea was the predominant symptoms in all patients MC, irrespective of comorbidities. CONCLUSION: In a retrospective study, we identified lymphocytic disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract that are significantly more common in patients with than without MC. These associations suggest the existence of an underlying etiology that is common to all lymphocytic disorders and that affects the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract.

3 Article Celiac Disease and Autoimmunity - The Missing Ingredient. 2017

Rosenbaum, James T. ·From the Legacy Devers Eye Institute and Oregon Health and Science University, Portland. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #29020591.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Article Single-chain recombinant HLA-DQ2.5/peptide molecules block α2-gliadin-specific pathogenic CD4+ T-cell proliferation and attenuate production of inflammatory cytokines: a potential therapy for celiac disease. 2011

Huan, J / Meza-Romero, R / Mooney, J L / Vandenbark, A A / Offner, H / Burrows, G G. ·Department of Neurology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA. ·Mucosal Immunol · Pubmed #20736999.

ABSTRACT: Celiac disease (CD) is a disorder of the small intestine caused by intolerance to wheat gluten and related proteins in barley and rye. CD4(+) T cells have a central role in CD, recognizing and binding complexes of HLA-DQ2.5 bearing gluten peptides that have survived digestion and that are deamidated by tissue transglutaminase (TG2), propagating a cascade of inflammatory processes that damage and eventually destroy the villous tissue structures of the small intestine. In this study, we present data showing that recombinant DQ2.5-derived molecules bearing covalently tethered α2-gliadin-61-71 peptide have a remarkable ability to block antigen-specific T-cell proliferation and inhibited proinflammatory cytokine secretion in human DQ2.5-restricted α2-gliadin-specific T-cell clones obtained from patients with CD. The results from our in vitro studies suggest that HLA-DQ2.5-derived molecules could significantly inhibit and perhaps reverse the intestinal pathology caused by T-cell-mediated inflammation and the associated production of proinflammatory cytokines.

5 Minor A Successful HSCT in a Girl with Novel LRBA Mutation with Refractory Celiac Disease. 2016

Sari, Sinan / Dogu, Figen / Hwa, Vivian / Haskologlu, Sule / Dauber, Andrew / Rosenfeld, Ron / Polat, Meltem / Kuloglu, Zarife / Kansu, Aydan / Dalgic, Buket / Ikinciogullari, Aydan. ·Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Gazi University Faculty of Medicine, 06500, Besevler, Ankara, Turkey. drsinansari@gmail.com. · Department of Pediatric Allergy/Immunology, Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. · Division of Endocrinology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA. · Pediatric Infectious Disease, Gazi University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. · Pediatric Gastroenterology, Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. · Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Gazi University Faculty of Medicine, 06500, Besevler, Ankara, Turkey. ·J Clin Immunol · Pubmed #26686526.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --