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Celiac Disease: HELP
Articles by Karina W. Davidson
Based on 1 article published since 2010
(Why 1 article?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Karina W. Davidson wrote the following article about Celiac Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Screening for Celiac Disease: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2017

Anonymous3260901 / Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten / Grossman, David C / Curry, Susan J / Barry, Michael J / Davidson, Karina W / Doubeni, Chyke A / Ebell, Mark / Epling, John W / Herzstein, Jessica / Kemper, Alex R / Krist, Alex H / Kurth, Ann E / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Phipps, Maureen G / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen. ·University of California, San Francisco. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington. · University of Iowa, Iowa City. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · University of Georgia, Athens. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Independent consultant, Washington, DC. · Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia12Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Manoa. ·JAMA · Pubmed #28350936.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Celiac disease is caused by an immune response in persons who are genetically susceptible to dietary gluten, a protein complex found in wheat, rye, and barley. Ingestion of gluten by persons with celiac disease causes immune-mediated inflammatory damage to the small intestine. Objective: To issue a new US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for celiac disease. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the accuracy of screening in asymptomatic adults, adolescents, and children; the potential benefits and harms of screening vs not screening and targeted vs universal screening; and the benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected celiac disease. The USPSTF also reviewed contextual information on the prevalence of celiac disease among patients without obvious symptoms and the natural history of subclinical celiac disease. Findings: The USPSTF found inadequate evidence on the accuracy of screening for celiac disease, the potential benefits and harms of screening vs not screening or targeted vs universal screening, and the potential benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected celiac disease. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for celiac disease in asymptomatic persons. (I statement).