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Celiac Disease HELP
Based on 6,484 articles published since 2010
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These are the 6484 published articles about Celiac Disease that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline European Society for the Study of Coeliac Disease (ESsCD) guideline for coeliac disease and other gluten-related disorders. 2019

Al-Toma, Abdulbaqi / Volta, Umberto / Auricchio, Renata / Castillejo, Gemma / Sanders, David S / Cellier, Christophe / Mulder, Chris J / Lundin, Knut E A. ·Department of Gastroenterology, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Translational Medical Science, Section of Paediatrics, University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hospital Universitari Sant Joan de Reus, Universitat Rovira I Virgili, IISPV, Reus, Spain. · Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, Royal Hallamshire Hospital & University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. · Gastroenterology Department, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Paris, France. · Department of Gastroenterology, VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. · KG Jebsen Coeliac Disease Research Centre, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. ·United European Gastroenterol J · Pubmed #31210940.

ABSTRACT: This guideline presents recommendations for the management of coeliac disease (CD) and other gluten-related disorders both in adults and children. There has been a substantial increase in the prevalence of CD over the last 50 years and many patients remain undiagnosed. Diagnostic testing, including serology and biopsy, should be performed on a gluten-containing diet. The diagnosis of CD is based on a combination of clinical, serological and histopathological data. In a group of children the diagnosis may be made without biopsy if strict criteria are available. The treatment for CD is primarily a gluten-free diet (GFD), which requires significant patient education, motivation and follow-up. Slow-responsiveness occurs frequently, particularly in those diagnosed in adulthood. Persistent or recurring symptoms necessitate a review of the original diagnosis, exclude alternative diagnoses, confirm dietary adherence (dietary review and serology) and follow-up biopsy. In addition, evaluation to exclude complications of CD, such as refractory CD or lymphoma, should be performed. The guideline also deals with other gluten-related disorders, such as dermatitis herpetiformis, which is a cutaneous manifestation of CD characterized by granular IgA deposits in the dermal papillae. The skin lesions clear with gluten withdrawal. Also, less well-defined conditions such as non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) and gluten-sensitive neurological manifestations, such as ataxia, have been addressed. Newer therapeutic modalities for CD are being studied in clinical trials but are not yet approved for use in practice.

2 Guideline Diagnosis of chronic anaemia in gastrointestinal disorders: A guideline by the Italian Association of Hospital Gastroenterologists and Endoscopists (AIGO) and the Italian Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (SIGENP). 2019

Elli, Luca / Norsa, Lorenzo / Zullo, Angelo / Carroccio, Antonio / Girelli, Carlo / Oliva, Salvatore / Romano, Claudio / Leandro, Gioacchino / Bellini, Massimo / Marmo, Riccardo / Soncini, Marco / Monica, Fabio / De Francesco, Vincenzo / Paulon, Emma / Cappellini, Maria Domenica / Motta, Irene / Ferretti, Francesca / Orlando, Stefania / Mansueto, Pasquale / Buscarini, Elisabetta / Manfredi, Guido / Agostoni, Carlo / Tomba, Carolina / Cannizzaro, Renato. ·Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Division/Center for Prevention and Diagnosis of Coeliac Disease, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano. Electronic address: luca.elli@policlinico.mi.it. · Division of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Transplantation, ASST "Pope Giovanni XXIII", Bergamo. · Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, "Nuovo Regina Margherita" Hospital, Rome. · Internal Medicine, "Giovanni Paolo II" Hospital, Sciacca; Biomedical Department of Internal and Specialist Medicine - DiBiMIS, University of Palermo, Palermo. · Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Hospital of Busto Arsizio, Busto Arsizio. · Paediatric Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, University "La Sapienza" of Rome, Roma. · Paediatric Gastroenterology and Cystic Fibrosis Unit, Department of Human Pathology in Adulthood and Childhood "G. Barresi", University of Messina, Messina. · National Institute of Gastroenterology "S. De Bellis" Research Hospital, Castellana Grotte, Italy. · Gastrointestinal Unit, Department of Translational Research and New Technology in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa. · Gastroenterology ed Endoscopy, Polla Hospital, Salerno. · Internal Medicine, "Alessandro Manzoni" Hospital, ASST-Lecco, Lecco. · Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Cattinara Hospital, Trieste. · Gastroenterology Unit, "Riuniti" Hospital, Foggia, Italy. · Rare Diseases Center, Department of Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano; Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milano. · Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Division/Center for Prevention and Diagnosis of Coeliac Disease, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano. · Biomedical Department of Internal and Specialist Medicine - DiBiMIS, University of Palermo, Palermo. · Gastroenterology Unit, ASST Ospedale Maggiore di Crema, Crema. · Paediatric Intermediate Care Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano; Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milano. · Gastroenterology 2, ASST Papa Giovannin XXIII, Bergamo. · Oncological Gastroenterology Division, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico (CRO) IRCCS, Aviano. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #30850345.

ABSTRACT: Anaemia is a common pathologic condition, present in almost 5% of the adult population. Iron deficiency is the most common cause; other mechanisms can be involved, making anaemia a multi-factorial disorder in most cases. Anaemia being a frequent manifestation in the diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, patients are often referred to gastroenterologists. Furthermore, upper and lower endoscopy and enteroscopy are pivotal to the diagnostic roadmap of anaemia. In spite of its relevance in the daily clinical practice, there is a limited number of gastroenterological guidelines dedicated to the diagnosis of anaemia. For this reason, the Italian Association of Hospital Gastroenterologists and Endoscopists and the Italian Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition commissioned a panel of experts to prepare a specific guideline on anaemia and its diagnostic roadmap in the gastroenterological scenario. The panel also discussed about the potential involvement of gastroenterologists and endoscopists in the management of patients with anaemia, with particular attention to the correct use of investigations. The panel paid particular attention to practical issues with the aim to support gastroenterologists in their clinical practice when dealing with patients with anaemia.

3 Guideline AGA Clinical Practice Update on Diagnosis and Monitoring of Celiac Disease-Changing Utility of Serology and Histologic Measures: Expert Review. 2019

Husby, Steffen / Murray, Joseph A / Katzka, David A. ·Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Electronic address: murray.joseph@mayo.edu. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #30578783.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The purpose of this clinical practice update is to define key modalities in the diagnosis and monitoring of celiac disease (CD) in adults as well as in children and adolescents. METHODS: The recommendations outlined in this expert review are based on available published evidence, including cohort and case-control studies of the diagnostic process as well as controlled and descriptive studies of disease management. Best Practice Advice 1: Serology is a crucial component of the detection and diagnosis of CD, particularly tissue transglutaminase-immunoglobulin A (TG2-IgA), IgA testing, and less frequently, endomysial IgA testing. Best Practice Advice 2: Thorough histological analysis of duodenal biopsies with Marsh classification, counting of lymphocytes per high-power field, and morphometry is important for diagnosis as well as for differential diagnosis. Best Practice Advice 2a: TG2-IgA, at high levels (> ×10 upper normal limit) is a reliable and accurate test for diagnosing active CD. When such a strongly positive TG2-IgA is combined with a positive endomysial antibody in a second blood sample, the positive predictive value for CD is virtually 100%. In adults, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and duodenal biopsies may then be performed for purposes of differential diagnosis. Best Practice Advice 3: IgA deficiency is an infrequent but important explanation for why patients with CD may be negative on IgA isotype testing despite strong suspicion. Measuring total IgA levels, IgG deamidated gliadin antibody tests, and TG2-IgG testing in that circumstance is recommended. Best Practice Advice 4: IgG isotype testing for TG2 antibody is not specific in the absence of IgA deficiency. Best Practice Advice 5: In patients found to have CD first by intestinal biopsies, celiac-specific serology should be undertaken as a confirmatory test before initiation of a gluten-free diet (GFD). Best Practice Advice 6: In patients in whom CD is strongly suspected in the face of negative biopsies, TG2-IgA should still be performed and, if positive, repeat biopsies might be considered either at that time or sometime in the future. Best Practice Advice 7: Reduction or avoidance of gluten before diagnostic testing is discouraged, as it may reduce the sensitivity of both serology and biopsy testing. Best Practice Advice 8: When patients have already started on a GFD before diagnosis, we suggest that the patient go back on a normal diet with 3 slices of wheat bread daily preferably for 1 to 3 months before repeat determination of TG2-IgA. Best Practice Advice 9: Determination of HLA-DQ2/DQ8 has a limited role in the diagnosis of CD. Its value is largely related to its negative predictive value to rule out CD in patients who are seronegative in the face of histologic changes, in patients who did not have serologic confirmation at the time of diagnosis, and in those patients with a historic diagnosis of CD; especially as very young children before the introduction of celiac-specific serology. MANAGEMENT: Best Practice Advice 10: Celiac serology has a guarded role in the detection of continued intestinal injury, in particular as to sensitivity, as negative serology in a treated patient does not guarantee that the intestinal mucosa has healed. Persistently positive serology usually indicates ongoing intestinal damage and gluten exposure. Follow-up serology should be performed 6 and 12 months after diagnosis, and yearly thereafter. Best Practice Advice 11: Patients with persistent or relapsing symptoms, without other obvious explanations for those symptoms, should undergo endoscopic biopsies to determine healing even in the presence of negative TG2-IgA.

4 Guideline Statement on Best Practices in the Use of Pathology as a Diagnostic Tool for Celiac Disease: A Guide for Clinicians and Pathologists. 2018

Robert, Marie E / Crowe, Sheila E / Burgart, Lawrence / Yantiss, Rhonda K / Lebwohl, Benjamin / Greenson, Joel K / Guandalini, Stefano / Murray, Joseph A. ·Rodger C. Haggitt Gastrointestinal Pathology Society (GIPS). · Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. · North American Society for the Study of Celiac Disease (NASSCD). · Division of Gastroenterology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA. · Department of Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine. · Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University, New York, NY. · Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor, MI. · Section of Pediatric Gastroenterology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. ·Am J Surg Pathol · Pubmed #29923907.

ABSTRACT: Small intestinal biopsy interpretation has been the cornerstone for the diagnosis of celiac disease for over 50 years. Despite the existence of sensitive and specific serological tests, duodenal mucosal biopsies continue to be obtained in the vast majority of patients in whom a diagnosis of celiac disease is being considered. The accurate evaluation of these biopsies requires coordination and information sharing between the gastroenterologist, laboratory, and pathologist in order to optimize tissue sampling, preparation and interpretation. This document, a collaboration between the Rodger C. Haggitt Gastrointestinal Pathology Society and the North American Association for the Study of Celiac Disease, is intended to provide clinicians and pathologists with a summary of best practices in the use of endoscopy and biopsy for patients with suspected celiac disease. The authors present a comprehensive and critical appraisal of the literature with respect to the topics of endoscopic findings, best methods for the obtaining biopsies, completing the pathology form and pathologic assessment, including evaluating intraepithelial lymphocytes and villous architecture. A discussion of conditions with overlapping pathologic findings in duodenal mucosal biopsies is presented. In order to provide additional guidance for challenging situations, the authors include an appendix containing practical suggestions. This review may be utilized in interdisciplinary discussions to optimize care for patients with possible celiac disease.

5 Guideline World Gastroenterology Organisation Global Guidelines: Celiac Disease February 2017. 2017

Bai, Julio C / Ciacci, Carolina. ·*Hospital de Gastroenterología Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo †Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires, Argentina ‡Department of Medicine and Surgery, Scuola Medica Salernitana, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy. ·J Clin Gastroenterol · Pubmed #28877080.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Guideline Quality standards in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy: a position statement of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) and Association of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland (AUGIS). 2017

Beg, Sabina / Ragunath, Krish / Wyman, Andrew / Banks, Matthew / Trudgill, Nigel / Pritchard, D Mark / Riley, Stuart / Anderson, John / Griffiths, Helen / Bhandari, Pradeep / Kaye, Phillip / Veitch, Andrew. ·Department of Gastroenterology, NIHR Nottingham Digestive Diseases Biomedical Research Centre, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, UK. · Department of Surgery, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Sheffield, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, University College London Hospitals, London, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Sandwell General Hospital, West Bromwich, UK. · Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Sheffield, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cheltenham, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Wye Valley NHS Trust, Herefordshire, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth, UK. · Department of Histopathology, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS trust, Nottingham, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, New Cross Hospital, Wolverhampton, UK. ·Gut · Pubmed #28821598.

ABSTRACT: This document represents the first position statement produced by the British Society of Gastroenterology and Association of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland, setting out the minimum expected standards in diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The need for this statement has arisen from the recognition that while technical competence can be rapidly acquired, in practice the performance of a high-quality examination is variable, with an unacceptably high rate of failure to diagnose cancer at endoscopy. The importance of detecting early neoplasia has taken on greater significance in this era of minimally invasive, organ-preserving endoscopic therapy. In this position statement we describe 38 recommendations to improve diagnostic endoscopy quality. Our goal is to emphasise practices that encourage mucosal inspection and lesion recognition, with the aim of optimising the early diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal disease and improving patient outcomes.

7 Guideline Screening for Celiac Disease: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2017

Anonymous3260901 / Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten / Grossman, David C / Curry, Susan J / Barry, Michael J / Davidson, Karina W / Doubeni, Chyke A / Ebell, Mark / Epling, John W / Herzstein, Jessica / Kemper, Alex R / Krist, Alex H / Kurth, Ann E / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Phipps, Maureen G / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen. ·University of California, San Francisco. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington. · University of Iowa, Iowa City. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · University of Georgia, Athens. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Independent consultant, Washington, DC. · Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia12Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Manoa. ·JAMA · Pubmed #28350936.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Celiac disease is caused by an immune response in persons who are genetically susceptible to dietary gluten, a protein complex found in wheat, rye, and barley. Ingestion of gluten by persons with celiac disease causes immune-mediated inflammatory damage to the small intestine. Objective: To issue a new US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for celiac disease. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the accuracy of screening in asymptomatic adults, adolescents, and children; the potential benefits and harms of screening vs not screening and targeted vs universal screening; and the benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected celiac disease. The USPSTF also reviewed contextual information on the prevalence of celiac disease among patients without obvious symptoms and the natural history of subclinical celiac disease. Findings: The USPSTF found inadequate evidence on the accuracy of screening for celiac disease, the potential benefits and harms of screening vs not screening or targeted vs universal screening, and the potential benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected celiac disease. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for celiac disease in asymptomatic persons. (I statement).

8 Guideline Transition from childhood to adulthood in coeliac disease: the Prague consensus report. 2016

Ludvigsson, Jonas F / Agreus, Lars / Ciacci, Carolina / Crowe, Sheila E / Geller, Marilyn G / Green, Peter H R / Hill, Ivor / Hungin, A Pali / Koletzko, Sibylle / Koltai, Tunde / Lundin, Knut E A / Mearin, M Luisa / Murray, Joseph A / Reilly, Norelle / Walker, Marjorie M / Sanders, David S / Shamir, Raanan / Troncone, Riccardo / Husby, Steffen. ·Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Department of Paediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. · Division of Family Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. · Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy. · University of California, San Diego (UCSD), San Diego, California, USA. · Celiac Disease Foundation, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA. · Primary Care and General Practice, School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health, Durham University, Stockton on Tees, UK. · Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, Munich, Germany. · Hungary (for the Association of European Coeliac Societies, AOECS), Budapest, Hungary. · Department of Gastroenterology and Centre for Immune Regulation, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Paediatrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Immunology Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Columbia University Medical Center-Division of Paediatric Gastroenterology, New York, New York, USA. · Anatomical Pathology, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, School of Medicine & Public Health, Newcastle, Australia. · Academic Unit of Gastroenterology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital & University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. · Institute of Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Liver Diseases Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Department of Medical Translational Sciences & European Laboratory for the Investigation of Food Induced Diseases, University Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark. ·Gut · Pubmed #27196596.

ABSTRACT: The process of transition from childhood to adulthood is characterised by physical, mental and psychosocial development. Data on the transition and transfer of care in adolescents/young adults with coeliac disease (CD) are scarce. In this paper, 17 physicians from 10 countries (Sweden, Italy, the USA, Germany, Norway, the Netherlands, Australia, Britain, Israel and Denmark) and two representatives from patient organisations (Association of European Coeliac Societies and the US Celiac Disease Foundation) examined the literature on transition from childhood to adulthood in CD. Medline (Ovid) and EMBASE were searched between 1900 and September 2015. Evidence in retrieved reports was evaluated using the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation method. The current consensus report aims to help healthcare personnel manage CD in the adolescent and young adult and provide optimal care and transition into adult healthcare for patients with this disease. In adolescence, patients with CD should gradually assume exclusive responsibility for their care, although parental support is still important. Dietary adherence and consequences of non-adherence should be discussed during transition. In most adolescents and young adults, routine small intestinal biopsy is not needed to reconfirm a childhood diagnosis of CD based on European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) or North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) criteria, but a biopsy may be considered where paediatric diagnostic criteria have not been fulfilled, such as, in a patient without biopsy at diagnosis, additional serology (endomysium antibody) has not been performed to confirm 10-fold positivity of tissue transglutaminase antibodies or when a no biopsy strategy has been adopted in an asymptomatic child.

9 Guideline NASPGHAN Clinical Report on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Gluten-related Disorders. 2016

Hill, Ivor D / Fasano, Alessio / Guandalini, Stefano / Hoffenberg, Edward / Levy, Joseph / Reilly, Norelle / Verma, Ritu. ·*The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus†Center for Celiac Research, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children and Celiac Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston‡Section of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Celiac Disease Center, University of Chicago, IL§Center for Celiac Disease, Digestive Health Institute, Children's Hospital Colorado, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora||New York University School of Medicine, Special Projects Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, NYU Langone Medical Center¶Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY#Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia. ·J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr · Pubmed #27035374.

ABSTRACT: Dietary exclusion of gluten-containing products has become increasingly popular in the general population, and currently ∼30% of people in the United States are limiting gluten ingestion. Although celiac disease (CD), wheat allergy (WA), and nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) constitute a spectrum of gluten-related disorders that require exclusion of gluten from the diet, together these account for a relatively small percentage of those following a gluten-free diet, and the vast majority has no medical necessity for doing so. Differentiating between CD, WA, and NCGS has important prognostic and therapeutic implications. Because of the protean manifestations of gluten-related disorders, it is not possible to differentiate between them on clinical grounds alone. This clinical report will compare and contrast the manifestations of gluten-related disorders, emphasize the importance of differentiating between these conditions, discuss initial and subsequent tests needed to confirm the diagnosis, and provide recommendations on treatment and follow-up for each condition.

10 Guideline [GUIDELINES FOR DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF CELIAC DISEASE]. 2015

Lazebnik, L B / Tkachenko, Ye I / Oreshko, L S / Sitkin, S I / Karpov, A A / Nemtsov, V I / Osipenko, M F / Radchenko, V G / Fedorov, E D / Medvedeva, O I / Seliverstov, P V / Solov'yeva, Ye A / Shabanova, A A / Zhuravleva, M S / Anonymous1550843. · ·Eksp Klin Gastroenterol · Pubmed #26387169.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Guideline Recognition, assessment, and management of coeliac disease: summary of updated NICE guidance. 2015

Downey, Laura / Houten, Rachel / Murch, Simon / Longson, Damien / Anonymous4600841. ·National institute for Health and Care Excellence, Manchester M1 4BT, UK laura.downey@nice.org.uk. · National institute for Health and Care Excellence, Manchester M1 4BT, UK. ·BMJ · Pubmed #26333593.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Guideline Small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline. 2015

Pennazio, Marco / Spada, Cristiano / Eliakim, Rami / Keuchel, Martin / May, Andrea / Mulder, Chris J / Rondonotti, Emanuele / Adler, Samuel N / Albert, Joerg / Baltes, Peter / Barbaro, Federico / Cellier, Christophe / Charton, Jean Pierre / Delvaux, Michel / Despott, Edward J / Domagk, Dirk / Klein, Amir / McAlindon, Mark / Rosa, Bruno / Rowse, Georgina / Sanders, David S / Saurin, Jean Christophe / Sidhu, Reena / Dumonceau, Jean-Marc / Hassan, Cesare / Gralnek, Ian M. ·Division of Gastroenterology, San Giovanni Battista University Teaching Hospital, Turin, Italy. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University Tel-Hashomer, Israel. · Klinik für Innere Medizin, Bethesda Krankenhaus Bergedorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Medicine II, Sana Klinikum, Offenbach, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Gastroenterology Unit, Ospedale Valduce, Como, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. · Department of Medicine I, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany. · Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Européen Georges-Pompidou, Service d'Hépato-gastro-entérologie, Paris, France. · Medizinische Klinik, Evangelisches Krankenhaus, Düsseldorf, Germany. · Department of Hepato-Gastroenterology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, University Hospital of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France. · Royal Free Unit for Endoscopy and Centre for Gastroenterology, The Royal Free Hospital and University College London, London, UK. · Department of Medicine B, University of Münster, Münster, Germany. · Institute of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Ha'emek Medical Center Afula, Israel, Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology Haifa, Israel. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, UK. · Gastroenterology Department, Centro Hospitalar do Alto Ave, Guimarães, Portugal. · Clinical Psychology Unit, Department of Psychology, University of Sheffield. · Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Bénite, Lyon, France. · Gedyt Endoscopy Center, Buenos Aires, Argentina. ·Endoscopy · Pubmed #25826168.

ABSTRACT: This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). The Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). It addresses the roles of small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends small-bowel video capsule endoscopy as the first-line investigation in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 2 In patients with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, ESGE recommends performing small-bowel capsule endoscopy as soon as possible after the bleeding episode, optimally within 14 days, in order to maximize the diagnostic yield (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 ESGE does not recommend the routine performance of second-look endoscopy prior to small-bowel capsule endoscopy; however whether to perform second-look endoscopy before capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding or iron-deficiency anaemia should be decided on a case-by-case basis (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 In patients with positive findings at small-bowel capsule endoscopy, ESGE recommends device-assisted enteroscopy to confirm and possibly treat lesions identified by capsule endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends ileocolonoscopy as the first endoscopic examination for investigating patients with suspected Crohn's disease (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). In patients with suspected Crohn's disease and negative ileocolonoscopy findings, ESGE recommends small-bowel capsule endoscopy as the initial diagnostic modality for investigating the small bowel, in the absence of obstructive symptoms or known stenosis (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence).ESGE does not recommend routine small-bowel imaging or the use of the PillCam patency capsule prior to capsule endoscopy in these patients (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). In the presence of obstructive symptoms or known stenosis, ESGE recommends that dedicated small bowel cross-sectional imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance enterography/enteroclysis or computed tomography enterography/enteroclysis should be used first (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 6 In patients with established Crohn's disease, based on ileocolonoscopy findings, ESGE recommends dedicated cross-sectional imaging for small-bowel evaluation since this has the potential to assess extent and location of any Crohn's disease lesions, to identify strictures, and to assess for extraluminal disease (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). In patients with unremarkable or nondiagnostic findings from such cross-sectional imaging of the small bowel, ESGE recommends small-bowel capsule endoscopy as a subsequent investigation, if deemed to influence patient management (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). When capsule endoscopy is indicated, ESGE recommends use of the PillCam patency capsule to confirm functional patency of the small bowel (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 7 ESGE strongly recommends against the use of small-bowel capsule endoscopy for suspected coeliac disease but suggests that capsule endoscopy could be used in patients unwilling or unable to undergo conventional endoscopy (strong recommendation, low quality evidence).

13 Guideline ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines 2014. Other complications and diabetes-associated conditions in children and adolescents. 2014

Kordonouri, Olga / Klingensmith, Georgeanna / Knip, Mikael / Holl, Reinhard W / Aanstoot, Henk-Jan / Menon, Puthezhath S N / Craig, Maria E / Anonymous2370805. ·Diabetes Centre for Children and Adolescents, Children's Hospital auf der Bult, Hannover, Germany. ·Pediatr Diabetes · Pubmed #25182319.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Guideline Diagnosis and management of adult coeliac disease: guidelines from the British Society of Gastroenterology. 2014

Ludvigsson, Jonas F / Bai, Julio C / Biagi, Federico / Card, Timothy R / Ciacci, Carolina / Ciclitira, Paul J / Green, Peter H R / Hadjivassiliou, Marios / Holdoway, Anne / van Heel, David A / Kaukinen, Katri / Leffler, Daniel A / Leonard, Jonathan N / Lundin, Knut E A / McGough, Norma / Davidson, Mike / Murray, Joseph A / Swift, Gillian L / Walker, Marjorie M / Zingone, Fabiana / Sanders, David S / Anonymous420797 / Anonymous430797. ·Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Department of Paediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden. · Department of Medicine, Dr C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital, Del Salvador University, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Coeliac Centre/1st Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pavia, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. · University of Nottingham, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham, UK. · Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy. · Gastroenterology, Division of Nutritional Sciences, King's College London, The Rayne Institute, St Thomas Hospital, London, UK. · Coeliac Disease Center at Columbia University, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Neurology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK. · Registered dietitian and representative of the British Dietetic Association, Bath, Somerset, UK. · Blizard Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · School of Medicine, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland Department of Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Finland. · Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Imperial College NHS Healthcare Trust, St Mary's Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Centre for Immune Regulation, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. · Coeliac UK, Apollo Centre, London, UK. · Patient Representative & Regional Chairman for Coeliac UK, Sheffield, UK. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Immunology Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Llandough, Wales, UK. · Anatomical Pathology, University of Newcastle, Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Medicine & Public Health, Callaghan, Australia. · Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, Royal Hallamshire Hospital & University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. ·Gut · Pubmed #24917550.

ABSTRACT: A multidisciplinary panel of 18 physicians and 3 non-physicians from eight countries (Sweden, UK, Argentina, Australia, Italy, Finland, Norway and the USA) reviewed the literature on diagnosis and management of adult coeliac disease (CD). This paper presents the recommendations of the British Society of Gastroenterology. Areas of controversies were explored through phone meetings and web surveys. Nine working groups examined the following areas of CD diagnosis and management: classification of CD; genetics and immunology; diagnostics; serology and endoscopy; follow-up; gluten-free diet; refractory CD and malignancies; quality of life; novel treatments; patient support; and screening for CD.

15 Guideline ACG releases guideline on diagnosis and management of celiac disease. 2014

Armstrong, Carrie. · ·Am Fam Physician · Pubmed #24695571.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Guideline Joint BSPGHAN and Coeliac UK guidelines for the diagnosis and management of coeliac disease in children. 2013

Murch, Simon / Jenkins, Huw / Auth, Marcus / Bremner, Ronald / Butt, Assad / France, Stephanie / Furman, Mark / Gillett, Peter / Kiparissi, Fevronia / Lawson, Maureen / McLain, Bruce / Morris, Mary-Anne / Sleet, Sarah / Thorpe, Matthew / Anonymous1300768. ·Division of Metabolic and Vascular Health, Warwick Medical School, , Coventry, UK. ·Arch Dis Child · Pubmed #23986560.

ABSTRACT: The revised BSPGHAN guidelines for the diagnosis and management of coeliac disease represent an important shift in diagnostic strategy, aimed at simplifying and shortening the diagnostic process in selected cases. Guidance is given concerning the indications for testing for coeliac disease, which is still significantly underdiagnosed in the UK. While screening data suggest a likely incidence of 1 in 100 persons, only 10%-20% of this figure is currently being diagnosed.The BSPGHAN guidelines follow the new ESPGHAN guidelines in overall diagnostic strategy, while providing more didactic stratagems, which should be of assistance for paediatricians in specialties other than gastroenterology.

17 Guideline ACG clinical guidelines: diagnosis and management of celiac disease. 2013

Rubio-Tapia, Alberto / Hill, Ivor D / Kelly, Ciarán P / Calderwood, Audrey H / Murray, Joseph A / Anonymous3950756. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #23609613.

ABSTRACT: This guideline presents recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with celiac disease. Celiac disease is an immune-based reaction to dietary gluten (storage protein for wheat, barley, and rye) that primarily affects the small intestine in those with a genetic predisposition and resolves with exclusion of gluten from the diet. There has been a substantial increase in the prevalence of celiac disease over the last 50 years and an increase in the rate of diagnosis in the last 10 years. Celiac disease can present with many symptoms, including typical gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g., diarrhea, steatorrhea, weight loss, bloating, flatulence, abdominal pain) and also non-gastrointestinal abnormalities (e.g., abnormal liver function tests, iron deficiency anemia, bone disease, skin disorders, and many other protean manifestations). Indeed, many individuals with celiac disease may have no symptoms at all. Celiac disease is usually detected by serologic testing of celiac-specific antibodies. The diagnosis is confirmed by duodenal mucosal biopsies. Both serology and biopsy should be performed on a gluten-containing diet. The treatment for celiac disease is primarily a gluten-free diet (GFD), which requires significant patient education, motivation, and follow-up. Non-responsive celiac disease occurs frequently, particularly in those diagnosed in adulthood. Persistent or recurring symptoms should lead to a review of the patient's original diagnosis to exclude alternative diagnoses, a review of the GFD to ensure there is no obvious gluten contamination, and serologic testing to confirm adherence with the GFD. In addition, evaluation for disorders associated with celiac disease that could cause persistent symptoms, such as microscopic colitis, pancreatic exocrine dysfunction, and complications of celiac disease, such as enteropathy-associated lymphoma or refractory celiac disease, should be entertained. Newer therapeutic modalities are being studied in clinical trials, but are not yet approved for use in practice. Given the incomplete response of many patients to a GFD-free diet as well as the difficulty of adherence to the GFD over the long term, development of new effective therapies for symptom control and reversal of inflammation and organ damage are needed. The prevalence of celiac disease is increasing worldwide and many patients with celiac disease remain undiagnosed, highlighting the need for improved strategies in the future for the optimal detection of patients.

18 Guideline World Gastroenterology Organisation global guidelines on celiac disease. 2013

Bai, Julio C / Fried, Michael / Corazza, Gino R / Schuppan, Detlef / Farthing, Michael / Catassi, Carlo / Greco, Luigi / Cohen, Henry / Ciacci, Carolina / Eliakim, Rami / Fasano, Alessio / González, Andrea / Krabshuis, Justus H / LeMair, Anton / Anonymous1760747. ·Department of Medicine, Dr C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina. jbai@intramed.net ·J Clin Gastroenterol · Pubmed #23314668.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Guideline European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines for the diagnosis of coeliac disease. 2012

Husby, S / Koletzko, S / Korponay-Szabó, I R / Mearin, M L / Phillips, A / Shamir, R / Troncone, R / Giersiepen, K / Branski, D / Catassi, C / Lelgeman, M / Mäki, M / Ribes-Koninckx, C / Ventura, A / Zimmer, K P / Anonymous300714 / Anonymous310714 / Anonymous320714. ·Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital at Odense University Hospital. steffen.husby@ouh.regionsyddanmark.dk ·J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr · Pubmed #22197856.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Diagnostic criteria for coeliac disease (CD) from the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) were published in 1990. Since then, the autoantigen in CD, tissue transglutaminase, has been identified; the perception of CD has changed from that of a rather uncommon enteropathy to a common multiorgan disease strongly dependent on the haplotypes human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8; and CD-specific antibody tests have improved. METHODS: A panel of 17 experts defined CD and developed new diagnostic criteria based on the Delphi process. Two groups of patients were defined with different diagnostic approaches to diagnose CD: children with symptoms suggestive of CD (group 1) and asymptomatic children at increased risk for CD (group 2). The 2004 National Institutes of Health/Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality report and a systematic literature search on antibody tests for CD in paediatric patients covering the years 2004 to 2009 was the basis for the evidence-based recommendations on CD-specific antibody testing. RESULTS: In group 1, the diagnosis of CD is based on symptoms, positive serology, and histology that is consistent with CD. If immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase type 2 antibody titers are high (>10 times the upper limit of normal), then the option is to diagnose CD without duodenal biopsies by applying a strict protocol with further laboratory tests. In group 2, the diagnosis of CD is based on positive serology and histology. HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 testing is valuable because CD is unlikely if both haplotypes are negative. CONCLUSIONS: The aim of the new guidelines was to achieve a high diagnostic accuracy and to reduce the burden for patients and their families. The performance of these guidelines in clinical practice should be evaluated prospectively.

20 Guideline [Endoscopic capsule: position paper of the Catalan Society of Gastroenterology]. 2011

González Suárez, Begoña / Dedeu Cuscó, Josep Maria / Galter Copa, Sara / Mata Bilbao, Alfredo. ·Unidad de Endoscopia, Departamento de Gastroenterología, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, España. bgonzals@clinic.ub.es ·Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #21855177.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Guideline [Dermatitis herpetiformis. Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment. Centres de référence des maladies bulleuses auto-immunes. Société Française de Dermatologie]. 2011

Ingen-Housz-Oro, S / Joly, P / Bernard, P / Bedane, C / Prost, C / Anonymous450689. ·Service de dermatologie, hôpital Henri-Mondor, 51 avenue Maréchal-de-Lattre-de-Tassigny, Créteil, France. saskia.oro@hmn.aphp.fr ·Ann Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #21397159.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Editorial Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and Celiac disease - coincidence or causation? 2020

Charlesworth, Richard P G / Winter, Gal. ·School of Science and Technology, University of New England, Armidale, Australia. ·Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #32295433.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Editorial The gluten-free diet: an historical perspective and its use by people without coeliac disease. 2020

Cartee, Amanda / Murray, Joseph A. ·Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States of America. ·Med J Aust · Pubmed #31981420.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Editorial Editorial: inaccuracies in attribution of symptoms due to gluten-not just in those with self-reported noncoeliac gluten sensitivity. 2020

Gibson, Peter R. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Alfred Health and Monash University, Melbourne, Vic., Australia. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #31943272.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Editorial Editorial: inaccuracies in attribution of symptoms due to gluten-not just in those with self-reported noncoeliac gluten sensitivity. Authors' reply. 2020

Daveson, A James M / Tye-Din, Jason A / Anderson, Robert P. ·Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Coral Sea Clinical Research Institute, North Mackay, QLD, Australia. · Wesley Medical Research - The Wesley Hospital, Auchenflower, QLD, Australia. · Immunology Division, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, Parkville, VIC, Australia. · Department of Medical Biology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, VIC, Australia. · Centre for Food & Allergy Research, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, VIC, Australia. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #31943270.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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