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Bipolar Disorder: HELP
Articles by Trine Vik Lagerberg
Based on 37 articles published since 2010
(Why 37 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, T. Lagerberg wrote the following 37 articles about Bipolar Disorder.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Article Childhood maltreatment and polygenic risk in bipolar disorders. 2019

Aas, Monica / Bellivier, Frank / Bettella, Francesco / Henry, Chantal / Gard, Sebastien / Kahn, Jean-Pierre / Lagerberg, Trine V / Aminoff, Sofie R / Melle, Ingrid / Leboyer, Marion / Jamain, Stéphane / Andreassen, Ole A / Etain, Bruno. ·NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France. · INSERM U1144, Faculté de Pharmacie de Paris, Université Paris Descartes, Université Paris Diderot, Université Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · AP-HP, GH Saint-Louis - Lariboisière - F. Widal, Département de Psychiatrie et de Médecine Addictologique, Paris, France. · Fondation Fondamental, Créteil, France. · AP-HP, Pôle de Psychiatry, DHU Pepsy, Hôpitaux Universitaires Henri Monody, Créteil, France. · Université Paris-Est-Creteil-Val de Marne, Créteil, France. · Institut Pasteur, Unité Perception et Mémoire, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris, France. · ENBREC, European Network of Bipolar Research Expert Centres (ENBREC), Paris, France. · Centre Expert Trouble Bipolaire, Service de psychiatrie adulte, Hôpital Charles Perrens, Bordeaux, France. · Service de Psychiatrie et Psychologie Clinique, Centre Psychothérapique de Nancy - Université de Lorraine, Nancy, France. · Inserm, U955, Equipe Psychiatrie Translationnelle, Créteil, France. ·Bipolar Disord · Pubmed #31628696.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Childhood maltreatment is a well-known risk factor for developing a more severe and complex form of bipolar disorders (BD). However, knowledge is scarce about the interactions between childhood maltreatment and underlying genetic vulnerability on the clinical expression of BD. METHOD: We assigned a BD-polygenic risk score (BD-PRS), calculated from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium, to each individual in a sample of 402 cases with BD. The lifetime clinical expression of BD was characterized using structured interviews and patients completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) to assess the severity of childhood maltreatment. RESULTS: Cases who reported more severe childhood maltreatment had a lower BD-PRS (rho = -0.12, P = .01), especially when considering emotional abuse (rho = -0.16, P = .001). An interaction between BD-PRS and childhood maltreatment was observed for the risk of rapid cycling (P = .01). No further interactions between BD-PRS and childhood maltreatment were observed for other clinical characteristics (age at onset, suicide attempts, number of mood episodes, mixed features, substance use disorders and psychotic symptoms). CONCLUSION: Our study is the first to show that less genetic risk may be needed to develop a more unstable form of BD when exposed to childhood maltreatment. Our study supports childhood trauma as an independent risk factor for BD.

2 Article Tobacco smoking and other substance use disorders associated with recurrent suicide attempts in bipolar disorder. 2019

Icick, R / Melle, I / Etain, B / Ringen, P A / Aminoff, S R / Leboyer, M / Aas, M / Henry, C / Bjella, T D / Andreassen, O A / Bellivier, F / Lagerberg, T V. ·Inserm, U1144, Paris F-75006, France; Paris Diderot University, UMR-S 1144, Paris F-75013, France; Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, University Hospitals Saint-Louis - Lariboisière - F. Widal, Departement of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine, Paris F-75010, France; FondaMental Foundation, Créteil F-94000, France. Electronic address: romain.icick@aphp.fr. · Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Inserm, U1144, Paris F-75006, France; Paris Diderot University, UMR-S 1144, Paris F-75013, France; Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, University Hospitals Saint-Louis - Lariboisière - F. Widal, Departement of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine, Paris F-75010, France; FondaMental Foundation, Créteil F-94000, France. · Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · FondaMental Foundation, Créteil F-94000, France; Inserm U955, Psychiatric Genetics Team, Créteil F-94000, France; Paris Est University, Faculty of medicine, Créteil F-94000, France; Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, University Hospitals Henri Mondor, DHU PePsy, Psychiatry Center, Créteil F-94000, France. · FondaMental Foundation, Créteil F-94000, France; Paris Est University, Faculty of medicine, Créteil F-94000, France. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #31202989.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Suicide attempts (SA) are more frequent in bipolar disorder (BD) than in most other mental disorders. Prevention strategies would benefit from identifying the risk factors of SA recurrence in BD. Substance use disorders (SUD) (including tobacco-related) are strongly associated with both BD and SA, however, their specific role for the recurrence of SA in BD remains inadequately investigated. Thus, we tested if tobacco smoking - with or without other SUDs - was independently associated with recurrent SA in BD. METHODS: 916 patients from France and Norway with ascertained diagnoses of BD and reliable data about SA and SUD were classified as having no, single, or recurrent (≥2) SA. Five SUD groups were built according to the presence/absence/combination of tobacco, alcohol (AUD) and cannabis use disorders. Multinomial logistic regression was used to identify the correlates of SA recurrence. RESULTS: 338 (37%) individuals reported at least one SA, half of whom (173, 51%) reported recurrence. SUD comorbidity was: tobacco smoking only, 397 (43%), tobacco smoking with at least another SUD, 179 (20%). Regression analysis showed that tobacco smoking, both alone and comorbid with AUD, depressive polarity of BD onset and female gender were independently associated with recurrent SA. LIMITATIONS: Lack of data regarding the relative courses of SA and SUD and cross-national differences in main variables. CONCLUSION: Tobacco smoking with- or without additional SUD can be important risk factors of SA recurrence in BD, which is likely to inform both research and prevention strategies.

3 Article Sleep disturbances in schizophrenia spectrum and bipolar disorders - a transdiagnostic perspective. 2019

Laskemoen, Jannicke Fjæra / Simonsen, Carmen / Büchmann, Camilla / Barrett, Elizabeth Ann / Bjella, Thomas / Lagerberg, Trine Vik / Vedal, Trude Jahr / Andreassen, Ole A / Melle, Ingrid / Aas, Monica. ·NORMENT, KG Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: j.f.anderssen@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Early Intervention in Psychosis Advisory Unit for South East Norway, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital Trust, Norway. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. · Early Intervention in Psychosis Advisory Unit for South East Norway, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital Trust, Norway. ·Compr Psychiatry · Pubmed #30856497.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sleep disturbances are prevalent in severe mental disorders but their type and frequency across diagnostic categories has not been investigated in large scale studies. METHODS: Participants with Schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SCZ, (N = 617)), Bipolar disorders (BD, (N = 440)), and Healthy Controls (HC, (N = 173)) were included in the study. Sleep disturbances (insomnia, hypersomnia and delayed sleep phase) were identified based on items from the Inventory of Depressive Symptoms - Clinician rated scale. Clinical symptoms were assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome scale and level of functioning with the Global assessment of Functioning scale. RESULTS: The rate of any sleep disturbance was 78% in SZ, 69% in BD and 39% in HC. Insomnia was the most frequently reported sleep disturbance across all groups. Both diagnostic groups reported significantly more of any sleep disturbances than HC (P < 0.001). Having a sleep disturbance was associated with more severe negative and depressive symptoms and with lower functioning across diagnostic groups (P < 0.001, η CONCLUSION: Sleep disturbances, including insomnia, hypersomnia and delayed sleep phase, are frequent in SCZ and BD, and associated with more severe clinical symptomatology across diagnostic groups. This suggests that sleep disturbance is a clinically relevant transdiagnostic phenomenon.

4 Article Validity of the Birchwood insight scale in patients with schizophrenia spectrum- and bipolar disorders. 2019

Büchmann, Camilla Bakkalia / Pedersen, Geir / Aminoff, Sofie Ragnhild / Laskemoen, Jannicke Fjæra / Barrett, Elizabeth Ann / Melle, Ingrid / Lagerberg, Trine Vik. ·NORMENT and K.G. Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: c.b.buchmann@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT and K.G. Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Department of Personality Psychiatry, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo, Norway. · NORMENT and K.G. Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Early Intervention in Psychosis Advisory Unit for South East Norway, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo, Norway. · NORMENT and K.G. Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. · Oslo University Hospital, Early Intervention in Psychosis Advisory Unit for South East Norway, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo, Norway. · NORMENT and K.G. Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; NORMENT and K.G. Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · NORMENT and K.G. Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ·Psychiatry Res · Pubmed #30832191.

ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to investigate the validity of the Norwegian version of the Insight Scale (IS) in large and representative samples of patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, bipolar I disorder and bipolar II disorder. A total of 997 participants were included (schizophrenia spectrum disorders: 557; bipolar I disorder: 282; bipolar II disorder: 138). Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to investigate the construct validity and bivariate correlational analysis was applied to investigate convergent validity. Confirmatory factor analyses indicated a reasonable model fit to the original three-factor subscale structure of the IS in all three diagnostic groups. The IS total score and its subscales correlated significantly with both the insight items in the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale in both schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar I disorder. In the bipolar II disorder group, however, the IS subscales correlated poorly with both the observer-rated measures. Our study supports the construct validity of the IS in both schizophrenia spectrum disorder- and bipolar disorder populations. The study also demonstrates that patients' self-reports of insight correspond to observer-based single item ratings of insight in bipolar I disorder and schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

5 Article Cardiovascular risk remains high in schizophrenia with modest improvements in bipolar disorder during past decade. 2019

Rødevand, L / Steen, N E / Elvsåshagen, T / Quintana, D S / Reponen, E J / Mørch, R H / Lunding, S H / Vedal, T S J / Dieset, I / Melle, I / Lagerberg, T V / Andreassen, O A. ·NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ·Acta Psychiatr Scand · Pubmed #30697685.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: While CVD risk has decreased in the general population during the last decade, the situation in patients with schizophrenia (SCZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) is unknown. METHODS: We compared CVD risk factors in patients with SCZ and BD recruited from 2002-2005 (2005 sample, N = 270) with patients recruited from 2006-2017 (2017 sample, N = 1011) from the same catchment area in Norway. The 2017 sample was also compared with healthy controls (N = 922) and the general population (N range = 1285-4587, Statistics Norway) from the same area and period. RESULTS: Patients with SCZ and BD in the 2017 sample had significantly higher level of most CVD risk factors compared to healthy controls and the general population. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of CVD risk factors in SCZ between the 2005 and 2017 samples except a small increase in glucose in the 2017 sample. There were small-to-moderate reductions in hypertension, obesity, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, systolic and diastolic blood pressure in the BD 2017 sample compared to the 2005 sample. CONCLUSION: Despite major advances in health promotion during the past decade, there has been no reduction in the level of CVD risk factors in patients with SCZ and modest improvement in BD.

6 Article White matter aberrations and age-related trajectories in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder revealed by diffusion tensor imaging. 2018

Tønnesen, Siren / Kaufmann, Tobias / Doan, Nhat Trung / Alnæs, Dag / Córdova-Palomera, Aldo / Meer, Dennis van der / Rokicki, Jaroslav / Moberget, Torgeir / Gurholt, Tiril P / Haukvik, Unn K / Ueland, Torill / Lagerberg, Trine Vik / Agartz, Ingrid / Andreassen, Ole A / Westlye, Lars T. ·NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. siren.tonnesen@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Psychiatric Research, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. l.t.westlye@psykologi.uio.no. · Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. l.t.westlye@psykologi.uio.no. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #30237410.

ABSTRACT: Supported by histological and genetic evidence implicating myelin, neuroinflammation and oligodendrocyte dysfunction in schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SZ), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have consistently shown white matter (WM) abnormalities when compared to healthy controls (HC). The diagnostic specificity remains unclear, with bipolar disorders (BD) frequently conceptualized as a less severe clinical manifestation along a psychotic spectrum. Further, the age-related dynamics and possible sex differences of WM abnormalities in SZ and BD are currently understudied. Using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) we compared DTI-based microstructural indices between SZ (n = 128), BD (n = 61), and HC (n = 293). We tested for age-by-group and sex-by-group interactions, computed effect sizes within different age-bins and within genders. TBSS revealed global reductions in fractional anisotropy (FA) and increases in radial (RD) diffusivity in SZ compared to HC, with strongest effects in the body and splenium of the corpus callosum, and lower FA in SZ compared to BD in right inferior longitudinal fasciculus and right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and no significant differences between BD and HC. The results were not strongly dependent on age or sex. Despite lack of significant group-by-age interactions, a sliding-window approach supported widespread WM involvement in SZ with most profound differences in FA from the late 20 s.

7 Article Cortical thickness, cortical surface area and subcortical volumes in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients with cannabis use. 2018

Hartberg, Cecilie Bhandari / Lange, Elisabeth H / Lagerberg, Trine Vik / Haukvik, Unn K / Andreassen, Ole A / Melle, Ingrid / Agartz, Ingrid. ·Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Department of Psychiatric Research, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway; NORMENT and K.G. Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: ceciliehartberg@icloud.com. · Department of Psychiatric Research, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway; NORMENT and K.G. Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. · NORMENT and K.G. Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · NORMENT and K.G. Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. ·Eur Neuropsychopharmacol · Pubmed #29254657.

ABSTRACT: Cannabis is associated with increased risk for severe mental illness and is commonly used among individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. In this study we investigated associations between cannabis use and brain structures among patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained for 77 schizophrenia and 55 bipolar patients with a history of cannabis use (defined as lifetime use >10 times during one month or abuse/dependence), and 97 schizophrenia, 85 bipolar disorder patients and 277 healthy controls without any previous cannabis use. Cortical thickness, cortical surface area and subcortical volumes were compared between groups. Both hypothesis-driven region-of-interest analyses from 11 preselected brain regions in each hemisphere and exploratory point-by-point analyses were performed. We tested for diagnostic interactions and controlled for potential confounders. After controlling for confounders such as tobacco use and alcohol use disorders we found reduced cortical thickness in the caudal middle frontal gyrus compared to non-user patients and healthy controls. The findings were not significant when patients with co-morbid alcohol and illicit drug use were excluded from the analyses, but onset of cannabis use before illness onset was associated with cortical thinning in the caudal middle frontal gyrus. To conclude, we found no structural brain changes associated with cannabis use among patients with severe mental illness, but the findings indicate excess cortical thinning among those who use cannabis before illness onset. The present findings support the understanding that cannabis use is associated with limited brain effects in schizophrenia as well as bipolar disorder.

8 Article Neurocognitive functioning, clinical course and functional outcome in first-treatment bipolar I disorder patients with and without clinical relapse: A 1-year follow-up study. 2018

Demmo, Christine / Lagerberg, Trine V / Kvitland, Levi R / Aminoff, Sofie R / Hellvin, Tone / Simonsen, Carmen / Haatveit, Beathe / Andreassen, Ole A / Melle, Ingrid / Ueland, Torill. ·NORMENT KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Specialized Inpatient Treatment, Division of Mental Health Services, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway. ·Bipolar Disord · Pubmed #29121444.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Due to limited research on the association between recurrence of mood episodes and the longitudinal course of neurocognitive functioning in early phase bipolar I disorder (BD I), the impact of recurrence on neurocognition remains unclear. Further, a strong correlation between neurocognitive impairment and functional impairment has been demonstrated. The longitudinal relationship between neurocognitive impairment and functional outcome in relation to recurrence is, however, not established. METHODS: The current study investigated the longitudinal relationship between neurocognition, recurrence of mood episodes and functional outcome in a sample of first-treatment (FT) BD I patients (N = 42), with and without relapse, during a 1-year follow-up period. The longitudinal course of neurocognitive functioning in the patients was also compared to that of a group of healthy controls (N = 143). RESULTS: Compared to both patients with relapse and healthy controls, no-relapse patients showed neurocognitive improvements. The polarity of the relapse episodes was mostly depressive, and for the no-relapse patients, reduction of symptoms was associated with neurocognitive improvement. No-relapse patients showed better global and occupational functioning. CONCLUSIONS: The current study found different neurocognitive and functional trajectories in FT BD I patients with and without relapse, with differences at follow-up to some degree being mediated by current symptoms. The current findings highlight the importance of treatment focusing on neurocognition and symptom states with the aim of improving functional recovery.

9 Article Psychotic patients who used cannabis frequently before illness onset have higher genetic predisposition to schizophrenia than those who did not. 2018

Aas, M / Melle, I / Bettella, F / Djurovic, S / Le Hellard, S / Bjella, T / Ringen, P A / Lagerberg, T V / Smeland, O B / Agartz, I / Andreassen, O A / Tesli, M. ·NORMENT,KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research,Institute of Clinical Medicine,University of Oslo,and Division of Mental Health and Addiction,Oslo University Hospital,Oslo,Norway. · NORMENT,KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research,Department of Clinical Science,University of Bergen,Bergen,Norway. · NORMENT,KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research,Division of Mental Health and Addiction,University of Oslo,Oslo,Norway. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #28967348.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) are heritable, polygenic disorders with shared clinical and genetic components, suggesting a psychosis continuum. Cannabis use is a well-documented environmental risk factor in psychotic disorders. In the current study, we investigated the relationship between SZ genetic load and cannabis use before illness onset in SZ and BD spectrums. Since frequent early cannabis use (age <18 years) is believed to increase the risk of developing psychosis more than later use, follow-up analyses were conducted comparing early use to later use and no use. METHODS: We assigned a SZ-polygenic risk score (PGRS) to each individual in our independent sample (N = 381 SZ spectrum cases, 220 BD spectrum cases and 415 healthy controls), calculated from the results of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) SZ case-control study (N = 81 535). SZ-PGRS in patients who used cannabis weekly to daily in the period before first illness episode was compared with that of those who never or infrequently used cannabis. RESULTS: Patients with weekly to daily cannabis use before illness onset had the highest SZ-PGRS (p = 0.02, Cohen's d = 0.33). The largest difference was found between patients with daily or weekly cannabis use before illness onset <18 years of age and patients with no or infrequent use of cannabis (p = 0.003, Cohen's d = 0.42). CONCLUSIONS: Our study supports an association between high SZ-PGRS and frequent cannabis use before illness onset in psychosis continuum disorders.

10 Article Impairment in emotion perception from body movements in individuals with bipolar I and bipolar II disorder is associated with functional capacity. 2017

Vaskinn, Anja / Lagerberg, Trine Vik / Bjella, Thomas D / Simonsen, Carmen / Andreassen, Ole A / Ueland, Torill / Sundet, Kjetil. ·Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1094, Blindern, 0317, Oslo, Norway. anja.vaskinn@psykologi.uio.no. · NORMENT KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. anja.vaskinn@psykologi.uio.no. · NORMENT KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Early Intervention in Psychosis Advisory Unit, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Mental Health and Addiction, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1094, Blindern, 0317, Oslo, Norway. ·Int J Bipolar Disord · Pubmed #28332121.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Individuals with bipolar disorder present with moderate impairments in social cognition during the euthymic state. The impairment extends to theory of mind and to the perception of emotion in faces and voices, but it is unclear if emotion perception from body movements is affected. The main aim of this study was to examine if participants with bipolar disorder perform worse than healthy control participants on a task using point-light displays of human full figures moving in a manner indicative of a basic emotion (angry, happy, sad, fearful, neutral/no emotion). A secondary research question was whether diagnostic subtypes (bipolar I, bipolar II) and history of psychosis impacted on this type of emotion perception. Finally, symptomatic, neurocognitive, and functional correlates of emotion perception from body movements were investigated. METHODS: Fifty-three individuals with bipolar I (n = 29) or bipolar II (n = 24) disorder, and 84 healthy control participants were assessed for emotion perception from body movements. The bipolar group also underwent clinical, cognitive, and functional assessment. Research questions were analyzed using analyses of variance and bivariate correlations. RESULTS: The bipolar disorder group differed significantly from healthy control participants for emotion perception from body movements (Cohen's d = 0.40). Analyses of variance yielded no effects of sex, diagnostic subtype (bipolar I, bipolar II), or history of psychosis. There was an effect of emotion, indicating that some emotions are easier to recognize. The lack of a significant group × emotion interaction effect points, however, to this being so regardless of the presence of bipolar disorder. Performance was unrelated to manic and depressive symptom load but showed significant associations with neurocognition and functional capacity. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with bipolar disorder had a small but significant impairment in the ability to perceive emotions from body movement. The impairment was global, i.e., affecting all emotions and equally present for males and females. The impairment was associated with neurocognition and functional capacity, but not symptom load. Our findings identify pathopsychological factors underlying the functional impairment in bipolar disorder and suggest the consideration of social cognition training as part of the treatment for bipolar disorder.

11 Article Course of neurocognitive function in first treatment bipolar I disorder: One-year follow-up study. 2017

Demmo, Christine / Lagerberg, Trine Vik / Aminoff, Sofie R / Hellvin, Tone / Kvitland, Levi R / Simonsen, Carmen / Haatveit, Beathe / Andreassen, Ole A / Melle, Ingrid / Ueland, Torill. ·NORMENT KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: christine.demmo@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. · NORMENT KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Specialized Inpatient Treatment, Division of Mental Health Services, Akershus University Hospital, Norway. · NORMENT KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway. ·Psychiatry Res · Pubmed #28142102.

ABSTRACT: Neurocognitive impairment has been found to be a marked feature in bipolar disorder (BD), also in the early phase of the illness. The longitudinal course of neurocognitive functioning, however, remains sparsely investigated. The aims of the study were to investigate the course of neurocognitive function in BD I, and to what degree neurocognitive change or stability is observed also on the individual level. Forty-two patients and 153 comparable healthy controls were assessed at baseline and one-year follow-up. Compared to the healthy control (HC) group BD I patients perform significantly poorer at both baseline and follow-up across all neurocognitive domains and on most neurocognitive subtests. Neurocognitive impairment remained stable for most patients from baseline to follow-up, both on a group level and when investigating individual trajectories, indicative of a relatively stable course of neurocognitive functioning in the early phase of BD I.

12 Article An exploration of metacognitive beliefs and thought control strategies in bipolar disorder. 2017

Østefjells, Tiril / Melle, Ingrid / Aminoff, Sofie R / Hellvin, Tone / Hagen, Roger / Lagerberg, Trine Vik / Lystad, June Ullevoldsæter / Røssberg, Jan Ivar. ·NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Department for Specialised Inpatient Treatment, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Akershus University Hospital, 1478 Lørenskog, Norway. Electronic address: tiril.ostefjells@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: ingrid.melle@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Department for Specialised Inpatient Treatment, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Akershus University Hospital, 1478 Lørenskog, Norway. Electronic address: s.r.aminoff@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: tone.hellvin@medisin.uio.no. · Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway. Electronic address: roger.hagen@svt.ntnu.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, 0424 Oslo, Norway. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, Adult Psychiatry Unit, University of Oslo, 0315 Oslo. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway. ·Compr Psychiatry · Pubmed #27918949.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Metacognitive factors influence depression, but are largely unexplored in bipolar disorders. We examined i) differences in metacognitive beliefs and thought control strategies between individuals with bipolar disorder and controls, and ii) to what extent clinical characteristics were related to levels of metacognitive beliefs and thought control strategies in bipolar disorder. METHOD: Eighty patients with bipolar disorder were assessed for age at onset of affective disorder, number of affective episodes, symptoms of mania and depression, metacognitive beliefs (MCQ-30) and thought control strategies (TCQ). Control subjects (N=166) completed MCQ-30 and TCQ. Factors impacting on metacognitive beliefs and thought control strategies were explored with multiple linear regressions. RESULTS: Patients with bipolar disorder reported higher levels of unhelpful metacognitive beliefs and thought control strategies than controls. Metacognitive beliefs were mainly influenced by depressive symptoms, and age at onset of affective illness. Thought control strategies were mainly influenced by metacognitive beliefs and age at onset of affective illness. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that metacognitive beliefs and control strategies are relevant in bipolar disorder. Depression and age at onset of affective disorder could contribute to metacognitive beliefs in bipolar disorder, and influence the use of thought control strategies. This indicates potential relationships that warrant further investigation for clinical relevance.

13 Article Task modulations and clinical manifestations in the brain functional connectome in 1615 fMRI datasets. 2017

Kaufmann, Tobias / Alnæs, Dag / Brandt, Christine Lycke / Doan, Nhat Trung / Kauppi, Karolina / Bettella, Francesco / Lagerberg, Trine V / Berg, Akiah O / Djurovic, Srdjan / Agartz, Ingrid / Melle, Ingrid S / Ueland, Torill / Andreassen, Ole A / Westlye, Lars T. ·NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: tobias.kaufmann@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. · Department of Medical Genetics, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: l.t.westlye@psykologi.uio.no. ·Neuroimage · Pubmed #27916665.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: An abundance of experimental studies have motivated a range of models concerning the cognitive underpinnings of severe mental disorders, yet the conception that cognitive and brain dysfunction is confined to specific cognitive domains and contexts has limited ecological validity. Schizophrenia and bipolar spectrum disorders have been conceptualized as disorders of brain connectivity; yet little is known about the pervasiveness across cognitive tasks. METHODS: To address this outstanding issue of context specificity, we estimated functional network connectivity from fMRI data obtained during five cognitive tasks (0-back, 2-back, go/no-go, recognition of positive faces, negative faces) in 90 patients with schizophrenia spectrum, 97 patients with bipolar spectrum disorder, and 136 healthy controls, including 1615 fMRI datasets in total. We tested for main effects of task and group, and their interactions, and used machine learning to classify task labels and predict cognitive domain scores from brain connectivity. RESULTS: Connectivity profiles were positively correlated across tasks, supporting the existence of a core functional connectivity backbone common to all tasks. However, 76.2% of all network links also showed significant task-related alterations, robust on the single subject level as evidenced by high machine-learning performance when classifying task labels. Independent of such task-specific modulations, 9.5% of all network links showed significant group effects, particularly including sensory (sensorimotor, visual, auditory) and cognitive (frontoparietal, default-mode, dorsal attention) networks. A lack of group by task interactions revealed that the pathophysiological sensitivity remained across tasks. Such pervasiveness across tasks was further supported by significant predictions of cognitive domain scores from the connectivity backbone obtained across tasks. CONCLUSIONS: The high accuracies obtained when classifying cognitive tasks support that brain connectivity indices provide sensitive and specific measures of cognitive states. Importantly, we provide evidence that brain network dysfunction in severe mental disorders is not confined to specific cognitive tasks and show that the connectivity backbone common to all tasks is predictive of cognitive domain traits. Such pervasiveness across tasks may support a generalization of pathophysiological models from different domains, thereby reducing their complexity and increasing their ecological validity. Future research incorporating a wider range of cognitive tasks, involving other sensory modalities (auditory, somatosensory, motor) and requirements (learning, perceptual inference, decision making, etc.), is needed to assess if under certain circumstances, context dependent aberrations may evolve. Our results provide further evidence from a large sample that fMRI based functional network connectivity can be used to reveal both, state and trait effects in the connectome.

14 Article Affective lability mediates the association between childhood trauma and suicide attempts, mixed episodes and co-morbid anxiety disorders in bipolar disorders. 2017

Aas, M / Henry, C / Bellivier, F / Lajnef, M / Gard, S / Kahn, J-P / Lagerberg, T V / Aminoff, S R / Bjella, T / Leboyer, M / Andreassen, O A / Melle, I / Etain, B. ·NORMENT,KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research,Institute of Clinical Medicine,University of Oslo,Norway. · AP-HP,Hôpitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor,Pôle de Psychiatry,DHU Pepsy,Créteil,France. · Fondation Fondamental,Créteil,France. · Inserm,U955,Equipe Psychiatrie Translationnelle,Créteil,France. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #27894372.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Many studies have shown associations between a history of childhood trauma and more severe or complex clinical features of bipolar disorders (BD), including suicide attempts and earlier illness onset. However, the psychopathological mechanisms underlying these associations are still unknown. Here, we investigated whether affective lability mediates the relationship between childhood trauma and the severe clinical features of BD. METHOD: A total of 342 participants with BD were recruited from France and Norway. Diagnosis and clinical characteristics were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS) or the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I). Affective lability was measured using the short form of the Affective Lability Scale (ALS-SF). A history of childhood trauma was assessed using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Mediation analyses were performed using the SPSS process macro. RESULTS: Using the mediation model and covariation for the lifetime number of major mood episodes, affective lability was found to statistically mediate the relationship between childhood trauma experiences and several clinical variables, including suicide attempts, mixed episodes and anxiety disorders. No significant mediation effects were found for rapid cycling or age at onset. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that affective lability may represent a psychological dimension that mediates the association between childhood traumatic experiences and the risk of a more severe or complex clinical expression of BD.

15 Article Alcohol use disorders are associated with increased affective lability in bipolar disorder. 2017

Lagerberg, Trine Vik / Aminoff, Sofie Ragnhild / Aas, Monica / Bjella, Thomas / Henry, Chantal / Leboyer, Marion / Pedersen, Geir / Bellivier, Frank / Icick, Romain / Andreassen, Ole A / Etain, Bruno / Melle, Ingrid. ·NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: t.v.lagerberg@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Specialized Inpatient Treatment, Division of Mental Health Services, Akershus University Hospital, Norway. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · AP-HP, Hôpital H. Mondor - A. Chenevier, DHU Pepsy, Pôle de Psychiatry, Créteil 94000, France; Inserm, U955, Créteil 94000, France; Institut Pasteur, Unité Perception et Mémoire, F-75015 Paris, France; ENBREC, European Network of Bipolar Research Expert Centres, Paris, France. · AP-HP, Hôpital H. Mondor - A. Chenevier, DHU Pepsy, Pôle de Psychiatry, Créteil 94000, France; Inserm, U955, Créteil 94000, France; ENBREC, European Network of Bipolar Research Expert Centres, Paris, France; Fondation FondaMental, Créteil, France. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Department of Personality Psychiatry, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo, Norway. · ENBREC, European Network of Bipolar Research Expert Centres, Paris, France; AP-HP, GH Saint-Louis - Lariboisière - F. Widal, Pôle de Psychiatrie et de Médecine Addictologique, 75475 Paris Cedex 10, France; Inserm, U1144, Paris F-75006, France; Université Paris Descartes, UMR-S 1144, Paris F-75006, France; Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 1144, Paris F-75013, France. · AP-HP, GH Saint-Louis - Lariboisière - F. Widal, Pôle de Psychiatrie et de Médecine Addictologique, 75475 Paris Cedex 10, France; Inserm, U1144, Paris F-75006, France; Université Paris Descartes, UMR-S 1144, Paris F-75006, France; Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 1144, Paris F-75013, France. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Fondation FondaMental, Créteil, France. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #27810713.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Affective dysregulation is a core feature of bipolar disorder (BD), and inter-episodic affect lability is associated with more severe outcomes including comorbidity. Rates of daily tobacco smoking and substance use disorders in BD are high. Knowledge regarding relationships between affective lability and abuse of the most commonly used substances such as tobacco, alcohol and cannabis in BD is limited. METHODS: We investigated whether dimensions of inter-episodic affective lability as measured with the Affective Lability Scale - short form (ALS-SF) were associated with lifetime daily tobacco use or alcohol (AUD) or cannabis use disorders (CUD) in a sample of 372 French and Norwegian patients with BD I and II. RESULTS: ALS-SF total score and all sub-dimensions (anxiety-depression, depression-elation and anger) were significantly associated with AUD, while only the depression-elation sub-dimension was associated with CUD, after controlling for possible confounders such as gender, age at interview, age at illness onset, BD subtype, duration of illness and other substance use disorders. Daily tobacco smoking was not significantly associated with affective lability. LIMITATIONS: Data for recent substance use or psychiatric comorbidities such as personality or hyperkinetic disorders were not available, and could have mediated the relationships. CONCLUSION: AUD is associated with several dimensions of inter-episodic affective lability in BD, while CUD is associated with increased oscillations between depression and elation only. Increased affective lability may partly explain the increased illness severity of patients with BD and AUD or CUD. Affective lability should be treated in order to prevent these comorbidities.

16 Article Duration of untreated illness in first-treatment bipolar I disorder in relation to clinical outcome and cannabis use. 2016

Kvitland, Levi Røstad / Ringen, Petter Andreas / Aminoff, Sofie Ragnhild / Demmo, Christine / Hellvin, Tone / Lagerberg, Trine Vik / Andreassen, Ole Andreas / Melle, Ingrid. ·NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway TOP Study, Oslo University Hospital, Building 49, Ullevål, Kirkeveien 166, PO Box 4956 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: l.r.kvitland@medisin.uio.no. · Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: p.a.ringen@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway TOP Study, Oslo University Hospital, Building 49, Ullevål, Kirkeveien 166, PO Box 4956 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Division of Mental Health Services, Department of Specialized Inpatient Treatment, Akershus University Hospital, Akershus, Norway. Electronic address: s.r.aminoff@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway TOP Study, Oslo University Hospital, Building 49, Ullevål, Kirkeveien 166, PO Box 4956 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: christine.demmo@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway TOP Study, Oslo University Hospital, Building 49, Ullevål, Kirkeveien 166, PO Box 4956 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: tone.hellvin@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway TOP Study, Oslo University Hospital, Building 49, Ullevål, Kirkeveien 166, PO Box 4956 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: t.v.lagerberg@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway TOP Study, Oslo University Hospital, Building 49, Ullevål, Kirkeveien 166, PO Box 4956 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: o.a.andreassen@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway TOP Study, Oslo University Hospital, Building 49, Ullevål, Kirkeveien 166, PO Box 4956 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: Ingrid.melle@medisin.uio.no. ·Psychiatry Res · Pubmed #27814886.

ABSTRACT: There is little knowledge about the role of the duration of untreated bipolar (DUB) illness in first-treatment bipolar disorder I (BD I), its association with symptoms at start of first treatment, and development over the first year, and limited knowledge about factors that influence the length of DUB. Substance use has shown to delay identification of primary psychiatric disorders, and while cannabis use is common in BD the role of cannabis in relationship to DUB is unclear. The aim of the present study is to examine the associations between DUB and key clinical outcomes at baseline in BD I, and at one year follow-up, and to evaluate the influence of cannabis use. Patients with first-treatment BD I (N=62) completed comprehensive clinical evaluations, which included both DUB and the number of previous episodes. There were no significant associations between DUB and key clinical outcomes. Longer duration from first manic episode to treatment was associated with risk of starting excessive cannabis use after onset of the bipolar disorder. The main finding is the lack of significant associations between features of previous illness episodes and clinical outcomes. Long duration of untreated mania seems to increase the risk for later cannabis use.

17 Article History of psychosis and previous episodes as potential explanatory factors for neurocognitive impairment in first-treatment bipolar I disorder. 2016

Demmo, Christine / Lagerberg, Trine Vik / Aminoff, Sofie R / Hellvin, Tone / Kvitland, Levi R / Simonsen, Carmen / Andreassen, Ole A / Melle, Ingrid / Ueland, Torill. ·NORMENT KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Specialized Inpatient Treatment, Division of Mental Health Services, Akershus University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. ·Bipolar Disord · Pubmed #26990158.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Explanatory factors for the observed neurocognitive impairment in early-stage bipolar I disorder (BD-I) have received little attention. The current study investigated neurocognitive functioning in first-treatment (FT) BD-I compared to FT schizophrenia (SCZ), and healthy controls (HCs), and the effect of history of psychosis and previous episodes in the two clinical groups. METHODS: A total of 202 FT patients with BD-I (n = 101) and SCZ spectrum disorder (n = 101), in addition to HCs (n = 101), were included. A comprehensive neurocognitive test battery was used to assess verbal learning and memory, executive functioning, processing speed, and attention and working memory. Neurocognitive functioning and the effect of history of psychosis and number of previous episodes were analyzed using separate multivariate analyses of variance and correlation analysis. RESULTS: FT patients with BD-I performed intermediately between FT SCZ spectrum patients and HCs on all measures. Compared to HCs, FT BD-I showed impaired functioning across all neurocognitive domains. No differences in neurocognitive functioning were observed in psychotic versus nonpsychotic FT patients with BD-I. With the exception of an association between number of manic episodes and two measures of executive function in FT BD-I, no associations were found between number of episodes and neurocognitive performance. CONCLUSIONS: Neurocognitive impairments were present in FT BD-I, and were not explained by history of psychosis or number of previous psychotic or depressive episodes. There were indications that executive function could be associated with number of previous manic episodes.

18 Article VRK2 gene expression in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and healthy controls. 2016

Tesli, Martin / Wirgenes, Katrine Verena / Hughes, Timothy / Bettella, Francesco / Athanasiu, Lavinia / Hoseth, Eva S / Nerhus, Mari / Lagerberg, Trine V / Steen, Nils E / Agartz, Ingrid / Melle, Ingrid / Dieset, Ingrid / Djurovic, Srdjan / Andreassen, Ole A. ·Martin Tesli, MD, PhD, Katrine Verena Wirgenes, MD, PhD, NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Timothy Hughes, PhD, NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Department of Medical Genetics, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Francesco Bettella, PhD, NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Lavinia Athanasiu, PhD, NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Department of Medical Genetics, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Eva S. Hoseth, MD, Mari Nerhus, MD, Trine V. Lagerberg, PhD, NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Nils E. Steen, MD, PhD, NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Drammen District Psychiatric Centre, Clinic of Mental Health and Addiction, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway; Ingrid Agartz, MD, PhD, NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Department of Psychiatric Research, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Ingrid Melle, MD, PhD, Ingrid Dieset, MD, PhD, NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Univ ·Br J Psychiatry · Pubmed #26941264.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Common variants in the Vaccinia-related kinase 2 (VRK2) gene have been associated with schizophrenia, but the relevance of its encoded protein VRK2 in the disorder remains unclear. AIMS: To identify potential differences in VRK2 gene expression levels between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, psychosis not otherwise specified (PNOS) and healthy controls. METHOD: VRK2 mRNA level was measured in whole blood in 652 individuals (schizophrenia, n = 201; bipolar disorder, n = 167; PNOS, n = 61; healthy controls, n = 223), and compared across diagnostic categories and subcategories. Additionally, we analysed for association between 1566 VRK2 single nucleotide polymorphisms and mRNA levels. RESULTS: We found lower VRK2 mRNA levels in schizophrenia compared with healthy controls (P<10(-12)), bipolar disorder (P<10(-12)) and PNOS (P = 0.0011), and lower levels in PNOS than in healthy controls (P = 0.0042) and bipolar disorder (P = 0.00026). Expression quantitative trait loci in close proximity to the transcription start site of the short isoforms of the VRK2 gene were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Altered VRK2 gene expression seems specific for schizophrenia and PNOS, which is in accordance with findings from genome-wide association studies. These results suggest that reduced VRK2 mRNA levels are involved in the underlying mechanisms in schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

19 Article Delayed sleep phase: An important circadian subtype of sleep disturbance in bipolar disorders. 2016

Steinan, Mette Kvisten / Morken, Gunnar / Lagerberg, Trine V / Melle, Ingrid / Andreassen, Ole A / Vaaler, Arne E / Scott, Jan. ·Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology & Department of Psychiatry, St. Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · NORMENT, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, & NORMENT Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. · Academic Psychiatry, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Centre for Affective Disorders, Institute of Psychiatry, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: jan.scott@newcastle.ac.uk. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #26655861.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Theoretical models of Bipolar Disorder (BD) highlight that sleep disturbances may be a marker of underlying circadian dysregulation. However, few studies of sleep in BD have reported on the most prevalent circadian sleep abnormality, namely Delayed Sleep Phase (DSP). METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 404 adults with BD who met published clinical criteria for insomnia, hypersomnia or DSP, and who had previously participated in a study of sleep in BD using a comprehensive structured interview assessment. RESULTS: About 10% of BD cases with a sleep problem met criteria for a DSP profile. The DSP group was younger and had a higher mean Body Mass Index (BMI) than the other groups. Also, DSP cases were significantly more likely to be prescribed mood stabilizers and antidepressant than insomnia cases. An exploratory analysis of selected symptom item ratings indicated that DSP was significantly more likely to be associated with impaired energy and activity levels. LIMITATIONS: The cross-sectional design precludes examination of longitudinal changes. DSP is identified by sleep profile, not by diagnostic criteria or objective sleep records such as actigraphy. The study uses data from a previous study to identify and examine the DSP group. CONCLUSIONS: The DSP group identified in this study can be differentiated from hypersomnia and insomnia groups on the basis of clinical and demographic features. The association of DSP with younger age, higher BMI and impaired energy and activity also suggest that this clinical profile may be a good proxy for underlying circadian dysregulation.

20 Article Sleep problems in bipolar disorders: more than just insomnia. 2016

Steinan, M K / Scott, J / Lagerberg, T V / Melle, I / Andreassen, O A / Vaaler, A E / Morken, G. ·Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. · Department of Psychiatry, St. Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. · Academic Psychiatry, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK. · Centre for Affective Disorders, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · NORMENT, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · NORMENT, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ·Acta Psychiatr Scand · Pubmed #26590799.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Sleep problems in bipolar disorder (BD) are common, but reported rates vary from 10% to 80%, depending on definitions, methodologies and management of potential confounding factors. This multicenter study seeks to address these issues and also compares BD cases with Hypersomnia as well as the more commonly investigated Insomnia and No Sleep Problem groups. METHOD: A cross-sectional comparison of sleep profiles in 563 BD I and II individuals who participated in a structured assessment of demographic, clinical, illness history and treatment variables. RESULTS: Over 40% cases met criteria for Insomnia and 29% for Hypersomnia. In univariate analysis, Insomnia was associated with BD II depression whilst Hypersomnia was associated with BD I depression or euthymia. After controlling for confounders and covariates, it was demonstrated that Hypersomnia cases were significantly more likely to be younger, have BD I and be prescribed antidepressants whilst Insomnia cases had longer illness durations and were more likely to be prescribed benzodiazepines and hypnotics. CONCLUSION: Whilst Insomnia symptoms are common in BD, Hypersomnia is a significant, frequently underexplored problem. Detailed analyses of large representative clinical samples are critical to extending our knowledge of differences between subgroups defined by sleep profile.

21 Article Cannabis use disorder is associated with greater illness severity in tobacco smoking patients with bipolar disorder. 2016

Lagerberg, T V / Icick, R / Andreassen, O A / Ringen, P A / Etain, B / Aas, M / Henry, C / Bjella, T D / Melle, I / Bellivier, F. ·NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: t.v.lagerberg@medisin.uio.no. · Inserm, U1144, Paris F-7 5006, France; Université Paris Diderot, UMR-S 1144, Paris F-75013, France; Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, GH Saint-Louis - Lariboisière - F. Widal, Département de Psychiatrie, Paris F-75010, France; FondaMental Foundation, Creteil F-94000, France. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · FondaMental Foundation, Creteil F-94000, France; Inserm, U955, Equipe Psychiatrie Génétique, Créteil 94000, France; Université Paris Est, Faculté de médecine, Créteil 94000, France; AP-HP, Hôpitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, DHU PePsy, Pôle de psychiatrie, Créteil 94000, France. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #26544611.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Cannabis use disorders (CUD) may influence the course of bipolar disorder (BD), but key confounding factors such as tobacco smoking have not been adequately addressed. This study examined whether CUD was associated with a more severe illness course in tobacco smoking BD patients. METHODS: A sample of French and Norwegian tobacco smoking patients with BD I and II (N=642) was investigated. DSM-IV diagnoses and other characteristics were obtained through personal interviews using structured questionnaires. The association between CUD and illness course was assessed in regression analyses. RESULTS: In bivariate analyses, CUD was associated with earlier BD onset, higher frequency of manic (in BD I) and depressive episodes and hospitalizations per illness year, and a higher occurrence of psychotic episodes. After controlling for potential confounders, the relationships with earlier BD onset (B=-5.60 95% CI=-7.65 to -3.64), and increased rates of manic episodes (OR=1.93, 95% CI: 1.15 to 3.23) and hospitalizations (OR=2.93, 95% CI: 1.85 to 4.64) remained statistically significant. LIMITATIONS: Despite the multivariate approach, differences between the two samples may lead to spurious findings related to hidden confounders. Substance use and mood episode information was collected retrospectively, and potential birth cohort effects could not be controlled for. CONCLUSION: Studies have found associations between tobacco smoking and poorer outcomes in BD. In this study on tobacco smoking BD patients we report an association between CUD and illness severity, suggesting that CUD exacerbates the disease evolution independently of tobacco smoking. Specific treatment and prevention programs addressing CUD in BD patients are warranted.

22 Article Cannabis use in first-treatment bipolar I disorder: relations to clinical characteristics. 2016

Kvitland, Levi R / Melle, Ingrid / Aminoff, Sofie R / Lagerberg, Trine V / Andreassen, Ole A / Ringen, Petter A. ·NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo. · Division of Mental Health Services, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway. · Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo. ·Early Interv Psychiatry · Pubmed #24739233.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between recent cannabis use, current symptomatology and age at onset of first manic, depressive and psychotic episodes in a large sample with first-treatment bipolar I disorder (BD I). METHODS: One hundred one patients with first-treatment Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) bipolar I disorder were included as part of the Thematically Organized Psychosis study. The Structural Clinical Interview for DSM-IV was used for DSM-IV diagnosis and identification of episodes of illness. Earlier suicide attempts were recorded. Manic, depressive and psychotic symptoms were rated using the Young Mania Rating Scale, Inventory of Depressive Symptoms and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale correspondingly. Cannabis use within the six last months was recorded. RESULTS: After controlling for confounders, recent cannabis use was significantly associated with lower age at onset of first manic and psychotic episode, but not with onset of first depressive episode (both P < 0.05). Recent use was also associated with more lifetime suicide attempts (P < 0.01). No group differences were found on symptom levels. CONCLUSIONS: The present study confirms earlier findings of an association between cannabis use and a lower age at onset. Recent cannabis use was also associated with more lifetime suicide attempts. The current findings suggest that recent cannabis use is associated with a more severe course of illness in the early phase of BD I.

23 Article Polygenic risk scores in bipolar disorder subgroups. 2015

Aminoff, Sofie Ragnhild / Tesli, Martin / Bettella, Francesco / Aas, Monica / Lagerberg, Trine Vik / Djurovic, Srdjan / Andreassen, Ole A / Melle, Ingrid. ·Department of Specialized Inpatient Treatment, Division of Mental Health Services, Akershus University Hospital, Norway; NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: s.r.aminoff@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #26047958.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Bipolar disorder (BD) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder. Current classifications of BD rely on clinical presentations without any validating biomarkers, making homogenous and valid subtypes warranted. This study aims at investigating whether a BD polygenic risk score (PGRS) can validate BD subtypes including diagnostic sub-categories (BD-I versus BD-II), patients with and without psychotic symptoms, polarity of first presenting episode and age at onset based groups. We also wanted to investigate whether illness severity indicators were associated with a higher polygenic risk for BD. METHODS: Analyze differences in BD PGRS scores between suggested subtypes of BD and between healthy controls (CTR) and BD in a sample of N=669 (255 BD and 414 CTR). RESULTS: The BD PGRS significantly discriminates between BD and CTR (p<0.001). There were no differences in BD PGRS between groups defined by diagnostic sub-categories, presenting polarity and age at onset. Patients with psychotic BD had nominally significantly higher BD PGRS than patients with non-psychotic BD after controlling for diagnostic sub-category (p=0.019). These findings remained trend level significant after Bonferroni corrections (p=0.079). LIMITATIONS: The low explained variance of the current PGRS method could lead to type II errors. CONCLUSIONS: There are nominally significant differences in BD PGRS scores between patients with and without psychotic symptoms, indicating that these two forms of BD might represent distinct subtypes of BD based in its polygenic architecture and a division between BD with and without psychotic symptoms could represent a more valid subclassification of BD than current diagnostic sub-categories. If replicated, this finding could affect future research, diagnostics and clinical practice.

24 Article Continued cannabis use at one year follow up is associated with elevated mood and lower global functioning in bipolar I disorder. 2015

Kvitland, Levi Roestad / Melle, Ingrid / Aminoff, Sofie Ragnhild / Demmo, Christine / Lagerberg, Trine Vik / Andreassen, Ole Andreas / Ringen, Petter Andreas. ·NORMENT, KG Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway TOP Study, Building 49, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Kirkeveien 166, PO Box 4956 Nydalen, 0424, Oslo, Norway. l.r.kvitland@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway TOP Study, Building 49, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Kirkeveien 166, PO Box 4956 Nydalen, 0424, Oslo, Norway. Ingrid.melle@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway TOP Study, Building 49, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Kirkeveien 166, PO Box 4956 Nydalen, 0424, Oslo, Norway. s.r.aminoff@medisin.uio.no. · Division of Mental Health Services, Department of Specialized Inpatient Treatment, Akershus University Hospital, Akershus, Norway. s.r.aminoff@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway TOP Study, Building 49, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Kirkeveien 166, PO Box 4956 Nydalen, 0424, Oslo, Norway. christine.demmo@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway TOP Study, Building 49, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Kirkeveien 166, PO Box 4956 Nydalen, 0424, Oslo, Norway. t.v.lagerberg@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway TOP Study, Building 49, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Kirkeveien 166, PO Box 4956 Nydalen, 0424, Oslo, Norway. o.a.andreassen@medisin.uio.no. · Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. p.a.ringen@medisin.uio.no. ·BMC Psychiatry · Pubmed #25651990.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is limited knowledge about how environmental factors affect the course of bipolar disorder (BD). Cannabis has been proposed as a potential risk factor for poorer course of illness, but the role of cannabis use has not been studied in a first treatment BD I sample. METHODS: The present study examines the associations between course of illness in first treatment BD I and continued cannabis use, from baseline to one year follow up. Patients (N = 62) with first treatment DSM-IV BD I were included as part of the Thematically Organized Psychosis study (TOP), and completed interviews and self-report questionnaires at both baseline and follow up. Cannabis use within the last six months at baseline and use between baseline and follow up ("continued use") was recorded. RESULTS: After controlling for confounders, continued cannabis use was significantly associated with elevated mood (YMRS) and inferior global functioning (GAF-F) at follow up. Elevated mood mediated the effect of cannabis use on global functioning. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that cannabis use has clinical implications for the early course of BD by increasing mood level. More focus on reducing cannabis use in clinical settings seems to be useful for improving outcome in early phase of the disorder.

25 Article Psychometric properties of the Affective Lability Scale (54 and 18-item version) in patients with bipolar disorder, first-degree relatives, and healthy controls. 2015

Aas, Monica / Pedersen, Geir / Henry, Chantal / Bjella, Thomas / Bellivier, Frank / Leboyer, Marion / Kahn, Jean-Pierre / Cohen, Renaud F / Gard, Sebastien / Aminoff, Sofie R / Lagerberg, Trine V / Andreassen, Ole A / Melle, Ingrid / Etain, Bruno. ·NORMENT, KG Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; NORMENT, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: monica.aas@medisin.uio.no. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; NORMENT, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · AP-HP, Hôpital H. Mondor - A. Chenevier, DHU Pepsy, Pôle de Psychiatry, Créteil 94000, France; Université Paris Est, Faculté de médecine, Créteil 94000, France; Inserm, U955, Créteil 94000, France; Fondation Fondamental, Créteil, France; ENBREC, European Network of Bipolar Research Expert Centres (ENBREC), Paris, France. · NORMENT, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Inserm, U955, Créteil 94000, France; Fondation Fondamental, Créteil, France; AP-HP, GH Saint-Louis - Lariboisière - Fernand Widal, Pôle Neurosciences, Paris 75010, France; Université Paris 7, Denis Diderot, Paris, France; ENBREC, European Network of Bipolar Research Expert Centres (ENBREC), Paris, France. · Fondation Fondamental, Créteil, France; Service de Psychiatrie et Psychologie Clinique, Université de Lorraine et CHU de Nancy, Hôpitaux de Brabois, Vandoeuvre Les Nancy 54500, France. · Fondation Fondamental, Créteil, France; Hôpital Charles Perrens, Centre Expert Trouble Bipolaire, Service de psychiatrie adulte, Pôle 3-4-7, Bordeaux 33000, France. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Specialized Inpatient Treatment, Division of Mental Health Services, Akershus University Hospital, 1478 Lørenskog, Norway. · NORMENT, KG Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; NORMENT, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; ENBREC, European Network of Bipolar Research Expert Centres (ENBREC), Paris, France. · AP-HP, Hôpital H. Mondor - A. Chenevier, DHU Pepsy, Pôle de Psychiatry, Créteil 94000, France; Inserm, U955, Créteil 94000, France; Fondation Fondamental, Créteil, France; ENBREC, European Network of Bipolar Research Expert Centres (ENBREC), Paris, France. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #25451440.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the original 54 item version (ALS-54) and the short 18 item version (ALS-18) of the Affective Lability Scale (ALS) in patients with bipolar disorders, their first-degree relatives and healthy controls. Internal Consistency and Confirmatory Factor Analysis were performed, comparing clinical and non-clinical group comparisons on ALS scores. METHODS: A total of 993 participants (patients with bipolar disorders [n=422], first-degree relatives [n=201] and controls [n=370]) were recruited from France and Norway. Diagnosis and clinical characteristics were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I), or the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS). Affective lability was measured using the ALS-54 and ALS-18. RESULTS: Both ALS-54 and ALS-18 showed high internal consistency, but the subdimensions of both versions were highly inter-correlated. From confirmatory factor analysis both versions revealed acceptable to good model fit. Patients had significantly higher ALS scores compared to controls, with affected first-degree relatives presenting intermediate scores. CONCLUSION: Both the original ALS-54 version and the short ALS-18 version showed good psychometric properties. They also discriminated between patients with a bipolar disorder (high ALS), first degree relatives (intermediate ALS), and healthy controls (low ALS). A high correlation between ALS items for both versions was observed. Our study supports reducing the scale from 54 to 18 items.

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