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Anxiety Disorders HELP
Based on 21,555 articles since 2006
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These are the 21555 published articles about Anxiety Disorders that originated from Worldwide during 2006-2015.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder: systematic review and evidence-based guideline sponsored by the American Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) and endorsed by the CNS and American Association of Neurological Surgeons. 2014

Hamani, Clement / Pilitsis, Julie / Rughani, Anand I / Rosenow, Joshua M / Patil, Parag G / Slavin, Konstantin S / Abosch, Aviva / Eskandar, Emad / Mitchell, Laura S / Kalkanis, Steven / Anonymous1050792 / Anonymous1060792 / Anonymous1070792. ·*Division of Neurosurgery, Toronto Western Hospital, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; ‡Department of Neurosurgery and Center for Neuropharmacology and Neuroscience, Albany Medical College, Albany, New York; §Neuroscience Institute, Maine Medical Center, Portland, Maine; ¶Department of Neurosurgery, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois; ‖Departments of Neurosurgery, Neurology, Anesthesiology, and Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; #Department of Neurosurgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois; **Department of Neurosurgery, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado; ‡‡Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; §§Congress of Neurological Surgeons, Guidelines Department, Schaumburg, Illinois; ¶¶Department of Neurosurgery, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan. · ·Neurosurgery · Pubmed #25050579.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: It is estimated that 40% to 60% of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) continue to experience symptoms despite adequate medical management. For this population of treatment-refractory patients, promising results have been reported with the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS). OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of the literature and develop evidence-based guidelines on DBS for OCD. METHODS: A systematic literature search was undertaken using the PubMed database for articles published between 1966 and October 2012 combining the following words: "deep brain stimulation and obsessive-compulsive disorder" or "electrical stimulation and obsessive-compulsive disorder." Of 353 articles, 7 were retrieved for full-text review and analysis. The quality of the articles was assigned to each study and the strength of recommendation graded according to the guidelines development methodology of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons Joint Guidelines Committee. RESULTS: Of the 7 studies, 1 class I and 2 class II double-blind, randomized, controlled trials reported that bilateral DBS is more effective in improving OCD symptoms than sham treatment. CONCLUSION: Based on the data published in the literature, the following recommendations can be made: (1) There is Level I evidence, based on a single class I study, for the use of bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS for the treatment of medically refractory OCD. (2) There is Level II evidence, based on a single class II study, for the use of bilateral nucleus accumbens DBS for the treatment of medically refractory OCD. (3) There is insufficient evidence to make a recommendation for the use of unilateral DBS for the treatment of medically refractory OCD.

2 Guideline Brazilian Medical Association guidelines for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of panic disorder. 2013

Levitan, Michelle Nigri / Chagas, Marcos H / Linares, Ila M / Crippa, José A / Terra, Mauro B / Giglio, Alcir T / Cordeiro, Joana L C / Garcia, Giovana J / Hasan, Rosa / Andrada, Nathalia C / Nardi, Antonio E. ·Laboratory of Panic & Respiration, Institute of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de JaneiroRJ, Brazil. · Department of Neurosciences and Behavioral Sciences, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Ribeirão PretoSP, Brazil. · Department of Clinical Medicine: Psychiatry, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto AlegreRS, Brazil. · Centro de Estudos Jose de Barros Falcão, Porto AlegreRS, Brazil. · Associação Brasileira de Neurologia, Associação Brasileira de NeurologiaBrazil, Brazil. · Associação Médica Brasileira, Associação Médica BrasileiraBrazil, Brazil. ·Rev Bras Psiquiatr · Pubmed #24402216.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To present the most relevant findings regarding the Brazilian Medical Association guidelines for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of panic disorder. METHODS: We used the methodology proposed by the Brazilian Medical Association for the Diretrizes Project. The MEDLINE (PubMed), Scopus, Web of Science, and LILACS online databases were queried for articles published from 1980 to 2012. Searchable questions were structured using the PICO format (acronym for "patient" [or population], "intervention" [or exposure], "comparison" [or control], and "outcome"). RESULTS: We present data on clinical manifestations and implications of panic disorder and its association with depression, drug abuse, dependence and anxiety disorders. In addition, discussions were held on the main psychiatric and clinical differential diagnoses. CONCLUSIONS: The guidelines are proposed to serve as a reference for the general practitioner and specialist to assist in and facilitate the diagnosis of panic disorder.

3 Guideline Recognition, assessment and treatment of social anxiety disorder: summary of NICE guidance. 2013

Pilling, Stephen / Mayo-Wilson, Evan / Mavranezouli, Ifigeneia / Kew, Kayleigh / Taylor, Clare / Clark, David M / Anonymous2160749. ·National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health, University College London, London WC1E 7HB, UK. · ·BMJ · Pubmed #23697669.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Guideline The Peaceful Mind manual: a protocol for treating anxiety in persons with dementia. 2013

Paukert, Amber L / Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia / Wilson, Nancy / Snow, A Lynn / Calleo, Jessica / Kunik, Mark E / Stanley, Melinda A. ·Puget Sound VA Medical Center, 1660 S. Columbian Way, Seattle, WA 98108, USA. Amber.Paukert@va.gov · ·Behav Modif · Pubmed #23447103.

ABSTRACT: Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among individuals with dementia and have a significant negative impact on their lives. Peaceful Mind is a form of cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety in persons with dementia. The Peaceful Mind manual was developed, piloted, and modified over 2 years. In an open trial and a small randomized, controlled trial, it decreased anxiety and caregiver distress. The treatment meets the unique needs of individuals with dementia by emphasizing behavioral rather than cognitive interventions, slowing the pace, limiting the material to be learned, increasing repetition and practice, using cues to stimulate memory, including a friend or family member in treatment as a coach, and providing sessions in the home. The manual presented here includes modules that teach specific skills, including awareness, breathing, calming self-statements, increasing activity, and sleep management, as well as general suggestions for treatment delivery.

5 Guideline [Definition, diagnosis and therapy of chronic widespread pain and so-called fibromyalgia syndrome in children and adolescents. Systematic literature review and guideline]. 2012

Zernikow, B / Gerhold, K / Bürk, G / Häuser, W / Hinze, C H / Hospach, T / Illhardt, A / Mönkemöller, K / Richter, M / Schnöbel-Müller, E / Häfner, R / Anonymous2710721. ·Deutsches Kinderschmerzzentrum, Vestische Kinder- und Jugendklinik, Universität Witten/Herdecke, Dr.-Friedrich-Steiner-Str. 5, 45711, Datteln, Deutschland. b.zernikow@deutsches-kinderschmerzzentrum.de · ·Schmerz · Pubmed #22760465.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The scheduled update to the German S3 guidelines on fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies ("Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften", AWMF; registration number 041/004) was planned starting in March 2011. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The development of the guidelines was coordinated by the German Interdisciplinary Association for Pain Therapy ("Deutsche Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Schmerztherapie", DIVS), 9 scientific medical societies and 2 patient self-help organizations. Eight working groups with a total of 50 members were evenly balanced in terms of gender, medical field, potential conflicts of interest and hierarchical position in the medical and scientific fields. Literature searches were performed using the Medline, PsycInfo, Scopus and Cochrane Library databases (until December 2010). The grading of the strength of the evidence followed the scheme of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. The formulation and grading of recommendations was accomplished using a multi-step, formal consensus process. The guidelines were reviewed by the boards of the participating scientific medical societies. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The diagnosis FMS in children and adolescents is not established. In so-called juvenile FMS (JFMS) multidimensional diagnostics with validated measures should be performed. Multimodal therapy is warranted. In the case of severe pain-related disability, therapy should be primarily performed on an inpatient basis. The English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink (under "Supplemental").

6 Guideline [Drug therapy of fibromyalgia syndrome. Systematic review, meta-analysis and guideline]. 2012

Sommer, C / Häuser, W / Alten, R / Petzke, F / Späth, M / Tölle, T / Uçeyler, N / Winkelmann, A / Winter, E / Bär, K J / Anonymous2690721. ·Neurologische Klinik, Universitätsklinikum Würzburg, Josef-Schneider-Str. 11, 97080, Würzburg, Deutschland. sommer@uni-wuerzburg.de · ·Schmerz · Pubmed #22760463.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The scheduled update to the German S3 guidelines on fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies ("Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften", AWMF; registration number 041/004) was planned starting in March 2011. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The development of the guidelines was coordinated by the German Interdisciplinary Association for Pain Therapy ("Deutsche Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Schmerztherapie", DIVS), 9 scientific medical societies and 2 patient self-help organizations. Eight working groups with a total of 50 members were evenly balanced in terms of gender, medical field, potential conflicts of interest and hierarchical position in the medical and scientific fields. Literature searches were performed using the Medline, PsycInfo, Scopus and Cochrane Library databases (until December 2010). The grading of the strength of the evidence followed the scheme of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. The recommendations were based on level of evidence, efficacy (meta-analysis of the outcomes pain, sleep, fatigue and health-related quality of life), acceptability (total dropout rate), risks (adverse events) and applicability of treatment modalities in the German health care system. The formulation and grading of recommendations was accomplished using a multi-step, formal consensus process. The guidelines were reviewed by the boards of the participating scientific medical societies. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Amitriptyline and-in case of comorbid depressive disorder or generalized anxiety disorder-duloxetine are recommended. Off-label use of duloxetine and pregabalin can be considered in case of no comorbid mental disorder. Strong opioids are not recommended. The English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink (under "Supplemental").

7 Guideline Guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder in primary care. 2012

Bandelow, Borwin / Sher, Leo / Bunevicius, Robertas / Hollander, Eric / Kasper, Siegfried / Zohar, Joseph / Möller, Hans-Jürgen / Anonymous5750716 / Anonymous5760716. ·Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany. Borwin.Bandelow@medizin.uni-goettingen.de · ·Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract · Pubmed #22540422.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Anxiety disorders are frequently under-diagnosed conditions in primary care, although they can be managed effectively by general practitioners. METHODS: This paper is a short and practical summary of the World Federation of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) for the treatment in primary care. The recommendations were developed by a task force of 30 international experts in the field and are based on randomized controlled studies. RESULTS: First-line pharmacological treatments for these disorders are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (for all disorders), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (for some) and pregabalin (for generalized anxiety disorder only). A combination of medication and cognitive behavior/exposure therapy was shown to be a clinically desired treatment strategy. CONCLUSIONS: This short version of an evidence-based guideline may improve treatment of anxiety disorders, OCD, and PTSD in primary care.

8 Guideline The CANMAT task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid anxiety disorders. 2012

Schaffer, Ayal / McIntosh, Diane / Goldstein, Benjamin I / Rector, Neil A / McIntyre, Roger S / Beaulieu, Serge / Swinson, Richard / Yatham, Lakshmi N / Anonymous4310709. ·Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ayal.schaffer@sunnybrook.ca · ·Ann Clin Psychiatry · Pubmed #22303519.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Comorbid mood and anxiety disorders are commonly seen in clinical practice. The goal of this article is to review the available literature on the epidemiologic, etiologic, clinical, and management aspects of this comorbidity and formulate a set of evidence- and consensus-based recommendations. This article is part of a set of Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) Comorbidity Task Force papers. METHODS: We conducted a PubMed search of all English-language articles published between January 1966 and November 2010. The search terms were bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, cross-referenced with anxiety disorders/symptoms, panic disorder, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Levels of evidence for specific interventions were assigned based on a priori determined criteria, and recommendations were developed by integrating the level of evidence and clinical opinion of the authors. RESULTS: Comorbid anxiety symptoms and disorders have a significant impact on the clinical presentation and treatment approach for patients with mood disorders. A set of recommendations are provided for the management of bipolar disorder (BD) with comorbid anxiety and major depressive disorder (MDD) with comorbid anxiety with a focus on comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder, use of cognitive-behavioral therapy across mood and anxiety disorders, and youth with mood and anxiety disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Careful attention should be given to correctly identifying anxiety comorbidities in patients with BD or MDD. Consideration of evidence- or consensus-based treatment recommendations for the management of both mood and anxiety symptoms is warranted.

9 Guideline Canadian guideline for safe and effective use of opioids for chronic noncancer pain: clinical summary for family physicians. Part 2: special populations. 2011

Kahan, Meldon / Wilson, Lynn / Mailis-Gagnon, Angela / Srivastava, Anita / Anonymous4480701. ·Department of Family Medicine and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. kahanm@stjoe.on.ca · ·Can Fam Physician · Pubmed #22084456.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide family physicians with a practical clinical summary of opioid prescribing for specific populations based on recommendations from the Canadian Guideline for Safe and Effective Use of Opioids for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Researchers for the guideline conducted a systematic review of the literature, focusing on reviews of the effectiveness and safety of opioids in specific populations. MAIN MESSAGE: Family physicians can minimize the risks of overdose, sedation, misuse, and addiction through the use of strategies tailored to the age and health status of patients. For patients at high risk of addiction, opioids should be reserved for well-defined nociceptive or neuropathic pain conditions that have not responded to first-line treatments. Opioids should be titrated slowly, with frequent dispensing and close monitoring for signs of misuse. Suspected opioid addiction is managed with structured opioid therapy, methadone or buprenorphine treatment, or abstinence-based treatment. Patients with mood and anxiety disorders tend to have a blunted analgesic response to opioids, are at higher risk of misuse, and are often taking sedating drugs that interact adversely with opioids. Precautions similar to those for other high-risk patients should be employed. The opioid should be tapered if the patient's pain remains severe despite an adequate trial of opioid therapy. In the elderly, sedation, falls, and overdose can be minimized through lower initial doses, slower titration, benzodiazepine tapering, and careful patient education. For pregnant women taking daily opioid therapy, the opioids should be slowly tapered and discontinued. If this is not possible, they should be tapered to the lowest effective dose. Opioid-dependent pregnant women should receive methadone treatment. Adolescents are at high risk of opioid overdose, misuse, and addiction. Patients with adolescents living at home should store their opioid medication safely. Adolescents rarely require long-term opioid therapy. CONCLUSION: Family physicians must take into consideration the patient's age, psychiatric status, level of risk of addiction, and other factors when prescribing opioids for chronic pain.

10 Guideline International consensus clinical practice statements for the treatment of neuropsychiatric conditions associated with epilepsy. 2011

Kerr, Mike P / Mensah, Seth / Besag, Frank / de Toffol, Bertrand / Ettinger, Alan / Kanemoto, Kousuke / Kanner, Andres / Kemp, Steven / Krishnamoorthy, Ennapadum / LaFrance, W Curt / Mula, Marco / Schmitz, Bettina / van Elst, Ludgers Tebartz / Trollor, Julian / Wilson, Sarah J / Anonymous3020700. ·Psychological Medicine, University of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff, United Kingdom. kerrmp@cf.ac.uk · ·Epilepsia · Pubmed #21955156.

ABSTRACT: In order to address the major impact on quality of life and epilepsy management caused by associated neuropsychiatric conditions, an international consensus group of epileptologists met with the aim of developing clear evidence-based and practice-based statements to provide guidance on the management of these conditions. Using a Delphi process, this group prioritized a list of key management areas. These included: depression, anxiety, psychotic disorders, nonepileptic seizures, cognitive dysfunction, antiepileptic drug (AED)-related neurobehavioral disorders, suicidality, disorders in children and adolescents, disorders in children with intellectual disability, and epilepsy surgery. Clinical practice statements were developed for each area and consensus reached among members of the group. The assessment and management of these conditions needs to combine knowledge of psychiatric disorders, knowledge of the impact of epilepsy and its treatment on psychopathology, and an ability to deliver care within epilepsy services. The aim of these statements is to provide guidance on quality care for people with epilepsy that have a range of neuropsychiatric disorders.

11 Guideline [Psychocardiological practice guidelines for ICD implantation and long-term care]. 2011

Jordan, J / Sperzel, J. ·Abteilung für Psychokardiologie, Herz-, Thorax- und Rheumazentrum, Kerckhoff-Klinik, Benekestr. 2-8, 61231, Bad Nauheim, Deutschland. j.jordan@reha.kerckhoff-klinik.de · ·Herzschrittmacherther Elektrophysiol · Pubmed #21822650.

ABSTRACT: In the literature there are only very few reports on systematic education or information for patients after implantation. Research in this field has only just begun so that there are no sufficiently evaluated models which could serve as the foundations for recommendations. Approximately 80% of affected patients, relatives and partners show a good cognitive acceptance and are capable of coping with the situation. However, in the first 12 months following ICD implantation some 20% of patients are in a state of anxiety and depression. These patients must be recognized and if necessary treated and given support. For this reason it is important in the consultation and routine appointments to give patients the chance to express their views on this if necessary. Only then can cardiologists recognize whether a patient is under substantial mental stress. It is recommended that immediately after the implantation and before being discharged from hospital, a screening procedure for anxiety and depression should be carried out using, e.g. the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and to distribute a questionnaire on desired information and unanswered questions. This would not only give a lead in for a targeted consultation during the follow-up appointment in the first year but also allow the opportunity to offer such patients an education course in order to specifically approach the problem being experienced. Patients who have experienced more than 5 shocks in 12 months or more than 3 shocks in 1 episode should attend a psychocardiological consultation in order to check whether there are post-traumatic disorders. It is imperative that these be treated because they do not in general resolve spontaneously.

12 Guideline [Guidelines of the Brazilian Medical Association for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of social anxiety disorder]. 2010

Chagas, Marcos Hortes N / Nardi, Antonio E / Manfro, Gisele G / Hetem, Luiz Alberto B / Andrada, Nathalia C / Levitan, Michelle N / Salum, Giovanni A / Isolan, Luciano / Ferrari, Maria Cecília Freitas / Crippa, José Alexandre S / Anonymous4280676. ·Departamento de Neurociências e Ciências do Comportamento, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, and Hospital das Clínicas-Terceiro Andar, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. · ·Rev Bras Psiquiatr · Pubmed #21308267.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Social anxiety disorder is the most common anxiety disorder. The condition has a chronic course usually with no remission and is frequently associated with significant functional and psychosocial impairment. The Brazilian Medical Association, with the project named Diretrizes ('Guidelines', in English), endeavors to develop diagnostic and treatment protocols for the most common disorders. This work presents the most relevant findings regarding the guidelines of the Brazilian Medical Association concerning the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of social anxiety disorder. METHOD: We used the methodology proposed by the Brazilian Medical Association for the Diretrizes project. The search was performed on the online databases Medline (PubMed), Scopus, Web of Science, and Lilacs, with no time restraints. Searchable questions were structured using PICO format (acronym for "patient or population"; "intervention, indicator or exposition"; "control or comparison" and; "outcome or ending"). RESULTS: We present data regarding the clinical manifestations of social anxiety disorder, impairments and implications related to the condition, differences between the generalized and specific subtypes, and the relationship with depression, drug dependence and abuse, and other anxiety disorders. Additionally, the main differential diagnoses are discussed. CONCLUSION: The guidelines are intended to serve as references to the general practitioner and the specialist as well, facilitating the diagnosis of social anxiety disorder.

13 Guideline Pre-treatment predictors and in-treatment factors associated with change in avoidant and dependent personality disorder traits among patients with social phobia. 2010

Borge, Finn-Magnus / Hoffart, Asle / Sexton, Harold / Martinsen, Egil / Gude, Tore / Hedley, Liv Margaret / Abrahamsen, Gun. ·Research Institute, Modum Bad, Norway. finnmagnus.borge@modum-bad.no · ·Clin Psychol Psychother · Pubmed #19630068.

ABSTRACT: We examined changes in avoidant and dependent personality disorder dimensions, and pre-treatment and in-treatment factors associated with such changes in 77 patients, randomized to medication-free residential cognitive (CT) or residential interpersonal therapy for social phobia. Personality disorders and personality dimensions according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) were assessed at pre-treatment and at one-year post-treatment. Both treatments were associated with a decrease in avoidant and dependent personality dimensions; dependent dimension decreased more in CT. Changes in cognitive factors predicted changes in both personality dimensions, whereas changes in symptoms or interpersonal factors did not. Change in the cognitive factor estimated cost was the most powerful predictor in the avoidant dimension, as it was the only predictor that remained significant in the forward regression analyses. Change in the cognitive factor estimated cost, and treatment were the most powerful predictors of change in the dependent dimension. Pre-treatment use of anxiolytics predicted larger changes in both PD dimensions.

14 Guideline World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of anxiety, obsessive-compulsive and post-traumatic stress disorders - first revision. 2008

Bandelow, Borwin / Zohar, Joseph / Hollander, Eric / Kasper, Siegfried / Möller, Hans-Jürgen / Anonymous2430619 / Zohar, Joseph / Hollander, Eric / Kasper, Siegfried / Möller, Hans-Jürgen / Bandelow, Borwin / Allgulander, Christer / Ayuso-Gutierrez, José / Baldwin, David S / Buenvicius, Robertas / Cassano, Giovanni / Fineberg, Naomi / Gabriels, Loes / Hindmarch, Ian / Kaiya, Hisanobu / Klein, Donald F / Lader, Malcolm / Lecrubier, Yves / Lépine, Jean-Pierre / Liebowitz, Michael R / Lopez-Ibor, Juan José / Marazziti, Donatella / Miguel, Euripedes C / Oh, Kang Seob / Preter, Maurice / Rupprecht, Rainer / Sato, Mitsumoto / Starcevic, Vladan / Stein, Dan J / van Ameringen, Michael / Vega, Johann. ·Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Gottingen, Gottingen, Germany. Sekretariat.Bandelow@med.uni-goettingen.de · ·World J Biol Psychiatry · Pubmed #18949648.

ABSTRACT: In this report, which is an update of a guideline published in 2002 (Bandelow et al. 2002, World J Biol Psychiatry 3:171), recommendations for the pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are presented. Since the publication of the first version of this guideline, a substantial number of new randomized controlled studies of anxiolytics have been published. In particular, more relapse prevention studies are now available that show sustained efficacy of anxiolytic drugs. The recommendations, developed by the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Task Force for the Pharmacological Treatment of Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive and Post-traumatic Stress Disorders, a consensus panel of 30 international experts, are now based on 510 published randomized, placebo- or comparator-controlled clinical studies (RCTs) and 130 open studies and case reports. First-line treatments for these disorders are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) and the calcium channel modulator pregabalin. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are equally effective for some disorders, but many are less well tolerated than the SSRIs/SNRIs. In treatment-resistant cases, benzodiazepines may be used when the patient does not have a history of substance abuse disorders. Potential treatment options for patients unresponsive to standard treatments are described in this overview. Although these guidelines focus on medications, non-pharmacological were also considered. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and other variants of behaviour therapy have been sufficiently investigated in controlled studies in patients with anxiety disorders, OCD, and PTSD to support them being recommended either alone or in combination with the above medicines.

15 Guideline Diagnosis of anxiety disorders in primary care. 2008

Ebell, Mark H. ·University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA. ebell@uga.edu ·Am Fam Physician · Pubmed #18756659.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Guideline A non-inferiority comparison of duloxetine and venlafaxine in the treatment of adult patients with generalized anxiety disorder. 2008

Allgulander, C / Nutt, D / Detke, M / Erickson, J / Spann, M / Walker, D / Ball, S G / Russell, J M. ·Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. christer.allgulander@ki.se. · ·J Psychopharmacol · Pubmed #18635722.

ABSTRACT: The present study is a non-inferiority comparison of duloxetine 60-120 mg/day and venlafaxine extended-release (XR) 75-225 mg/day for the treatment of adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The non-inferiority test was a prespecified plan to pool data from two nearly identical 10-week, multicentre, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind studies of duloxetine 60-120 mg/day and venlafaxine 75-225 mg/ day for the treatment of GAD. An independent expert consensus panel provided six statistical and clinical criteria for determining non-inferiority between treatments. Response was defined as > or =50% reduction in Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA) total score. In the pooled sample, patients were randomly assigned to duloxetine (n = 320), venlafaxine XR (n = 333) or placebo (n = 331). For the non-inferiority analysis, the per-protocol patients who were treated with duloxetine (n = 239) or venlafaxine XR (n = 262) improved significantly more (mean HAMA reductions were -15.4 and -15.2, respectively) than placebo-treated patients (n = 267; -11.6, P < or = 0.001, both comparisons). Response rates were 56%, 58% and 40%, respectively. Discontinuation rate because of AEs was significantly higher for duloxetine (13.4%, P < or = 0.001) and venlafaxine XR (11.4%, P < or = 0.01) groups compared with placebo (5.4%). Duloxetine 60-120 mg/day met all statistical and clinical criteria for non-inferiority and exhibited a similar tolerability profile compared with venlafaxine XR 75-225 mg/day for the treatment of adults with GAD.

17 Guideline ACOG Practice Bulletin: Clinical management guidelines for obstetrician-gynecologists number 92, April 2008 (replaces practice bulletin number 87, November 2007). Use of psychiatric medications during pregnancy and lactation. 2008

Anonymous1590606. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #18378767.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Guideline Practice guideline for the treatment of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. 2007

Koran, Lorrin M / Hanna, Gregory L / Hollander, Eric / Nestadt, Gerald / Simpson, Helen Blair / Anonymous3890592. · ·Am J Psychiatry · Pubmed #17849776.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Guideline Practice parameter for the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with anxiety disorders. 2007

Connolly, Sucheta D / Bernstein, Gail A / Anonymous3470578. · ·J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry · Pubmed #17242630.

ABSTRACT: This revised practice parameter reviews the evidence from research and clinical experience and highlights significant advancements in the assessment and treatment of anxiety disorders since the previous parameter was published. It highlights the importance of early assessment and intervention, gathering information from various sources, assessment of comorbid disorders, and evaluation of severity and impairment. It presents evidence to support treatment with psychotherapy, medications, and a combination of interventions in a multimodal approach.

20 Guideline Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) guidelines for the management of patients with bipolar disorder: update 2007. 2006

Yatham, Lakshmi N / Kennedy, Sidney H / O'Donovan, Claire / Parikh, Sagar V / MacQueen, Glenda / McIntyre, Roger S / Sharma, Verinder / Beaulieu, Serge / Anonymous3750574. ·Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, 2255 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada. yatham@interchange.ubc.ca · ·Bipolar Disord · Pubmed #17156158.

ABSTRACT: In 2005, the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) published guidelines for the management of bipolar disorder. This update reviews new evidence since the previous publication and incorporates recommendations based on the most current evidence for treatment of various phases of bipolar disorder. It is designed to be used in conjunction with the 2005 CANMAT Guidelines. The recommendations for the management of acute mania remain mostly unchanged. Lithium, valproate and several atypical antipsychotics continue to be recommended as first-line treatments for acute mania. For the management of bipolar depression, new data support quetiapine monotherapy as a first-line option. Lithium and lamotrigine monotherapy, olanzapine plus selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), and lithium or divalproex plus SSRI/bupropion continue to remain the other first-line options. First-line options in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder continue to be lithium, lamotrigine, valproate and olanzapine. There is recent evidence to support the combination of olanzapine and fluoxetine as a second-line maintenance therapy for bipolar depression. New data also support quetiapine monotherapy as a second-line option for the management of acute bipolar II depression. The importance of comorbid psychiatric and medical conditions cannot be understated, and this update provides an expanded look at the prevalence, impact and management of comorbid conditions in patients with bipolar disorder.

21 Guideline Guidelines for the pharmacologic treatment of neurobehavioral sequelae of traumatic brain injury. 2006

Anonymous5650570 / Warden, Deborah L / Gordon, Barry / McAllister, Thomas W / Silver, Jonathan M / Barth, Jeffery T / Bruns, John / Drake, Angela / Gentry, Tony / Jagoda, Andy / Katz, Douglas I / Kraus, Jess / Labbate, Lawrence A / Ryan, Laurie M / Sparling, Molly B / Walters, Beverly / Whyte, John / Zapata, Ashley / Zitnay, George. ·Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, USA. · ·J Neurotrauma · Pubmed #17020483.

ABSTRACT: There is currently a lack of evidence-based guidelines to guide the pharmacological treatment of neurobehavioral problems that commonly occur after traumatic brain injury (TBI). It was our objective to review the current literature on the pharmacological treatment of neurobehavioral problems after traumatic brain injury in three key areas: aggression, cognitive disorders, and affective disorders/anxiety/ psychosis. Three panels of leading researchers in the field of brain injury were formed to review the current literature on pharmacological treatment for TBI sequelae in the topic areas of affective/anxiety/ psychotic disorders, cognitive disorders, and aggression. A comprehensive Medline literature search was performed by each group to establish the groups of pertinent articles. Additional articles were obtained from bibliography searches of the primary articles. Group members then independently reviewed the articles and established a consensus rating. Despite reviewing a significant number of studies on drug treatment of neurobehavioral sequelae after TBI, the quality of evidence did not support any treatment standards and few guidelines due to a number of recurrent methodological problems. Guidelines were established for the use of methylphenidate in the treatment of deficits in attention and speed of information processing, as well as for the use of beta-blockers for the treatment of aggression following TBI. Options were recommended in the treatment of depression, bipolar disorder/mania, psychosis, aggression, general cognitive functions, and deficits in attention, speed of processing, and memory after TBI. The evidence-based guidelines and options established by this working group may help to guide the pharmacological treatment of the person experiencing neurobehavioral sequelae following TBI. There is a clear need for well-designed randomized controlled trials in the treatment of these common problems after TBI in order to establish definitive treatment standards for this patient population.

22 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines. Management of anxiety disorders. 2006

Anonymous1650568. · ·Can J Psychiatry · Pubmed #16933543.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Editorial [Editorial]. 2015

Romer, Georg. · ·Prax Kinderpsychol Kinderpsychiatr · Pubmed #26562082.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Editorial Comorbidity of personality disorder in obsessive-compulsive disorder: special emphases on the clinical significance. 2015

Zhang, TianHong / Chow, Annabelle / Tang, YingYing / Xu, LiHua / Dai, YunFei / Jiang, KaiDa / Wang, JiJun / Xiao, ZePing. ·1Shanghai Mental Health Center,Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine,Shanghai,PR China. · 2Department of Psychological Medicine,Changi General Hospital,Singapore. ·CNS Spectr · Pubmed #26425800.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Editorial Cigarette smoking in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder: a report from the International College of Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS). 2015

Dell'Osso, Bernardo / Nicolini, Humberto / Lanzagorta, Nuria / Benatti, Beatrice / Spagnolin, Gregorio / Palazzo, M Carlotta / Marazziti, Donatella / Hollander, Eric / Fineberg, Naomi / Stein, Dan J / Pallanti, Stefano / Van Ameringen, Michael / Lochner, Christine / Hranov, Georgi / Karamustafalioglu, Oguz / Hranov, Luchezar / Zohar, Joseph / Denys, Damiaan / Altamura, A Carlo / Menchon, Jose M. ·1Department of Psychiatry,University of Milan,Fondazione IRCCS Ca'Granda,Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico,Milano,Italy. · 3Carracci Medical Group,Mexico City,Mexico. · 4Center for Genomic Sciences,Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México,Mexico City,Mexico. · 5Dipartimento di Psichiatria,Neurobiologia,Farmacologia e Biotechnologie,Università di Pisa,Pisa,Italy. · 6Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center,New York,USA. · 7Mental Health Unit,Hertfordshire Partnership Foundation Trust,Queen Elizabeth II Hospital,Welwyn Garden City,UK. · 8MRC Unit on Anxiety and Stress Disorders,Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health,University of Cape Town,Cape Town,South Africa. · 9Department of Psychiatry,University of Florence, andInstitute of Neurosciences,Florence,Italy. · 10Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences,McMaster University,Hamilton,Canada. · 11MRC Unit on Anxiety and Stress Disorders,Department of Psychiatry,University of Stellenbosch,South Africa. · 12University Multiprofile Hospital for Active Treatment in Neurology and Psychiatry Sveti Naum,Sofia,Bulgaria. · 13Department of Psychiatry,Sisli Eftal Teaching and Research Hospital,Istanbul,Turkey. · 14Department of Psychiatry,Chaim Sheba Medical Center,Tel Hashomer,Israel. · 15Department of Psychiatry,Academic Medical Center,University of Amsterdam,Amsterdam,the Netherlands. · 16Psychiatry Unit at Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge. Barcelona,Spain. ·CNS Spectr · Pubmed #26349811.

ABSTRACT: Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) showed a lower prevalence of cigarette smoking compared to other psychiatric disorders in previous and recent reports. We assessed the prevalence and clinical correlates of the phenomenon in an international sample of 504 OCD patients recruited through the International College of Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS) network. Cigarette smoking showed a cross-sectional prevalence of 24.4% in the sample, with significant differences across countries. Females were more represented among smoking patients (16% vs 7%; p<.001). Patients with comorbid Tourette's syndrome (p<.05) and tic disorder (p<.05) were also more represented among smoking subjects. Former smokers reported a higher number of suicide attempts (p<.05). We found a lower cross-sectional prevalence of smoking among OCD patients compared to findings from previous studies in patients with other psychiatric disorders but higher compared to previous and more recent OCD studies. Geographic differences were found and smoking was more common in females and comorbid Tourette's syndrome/tic disorder.

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